Skip to main content

Full text of "Town Report"

See other formats


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/townreport19101915linc 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY, MASS. 



3 4864 00275 4769 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From February 1, 1910, to February 1, 1911 



ALSO THE 



Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THE YEAR 1910-1911 




BOSTON : 
Geo. E. Crosby Co., Printers 

394 Atlantic Avenue 
1911 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From February 1, 1910, to February 1, 1911 



ALSO THE 



Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THE YEAR 1910-1911 




BOSTON: 

Geo. E. Crosby Co., Printers 

394 Atlantic Avenue 

1911 



TOWN OFFICERS, 19KM9J1. 



Town Clerk. 
George L. Chapin. 

Selectmen and Overseers of Poor. 

Charles S. Smith, " Charles Lee Todd, 

Robert D. Donaldson. 



Board of Health, 



Edwards W. Herman 
R. D. Donaldson 
Martin M. Welch 



Term expires 1911 

" " 1912 

" 1913 



William H. Sherman 
Charles S. Wheeler 
William C. Peirce 



Assessors. 



Term expires 1911 
" " 1912 
" " 1913 



Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
Charles S. Wheeler. 

Auditor. 
James W. Lennon. 

Constables. 

James T. Laird, Winslow A. Eaton, 

George E. Cunningham. 



Commissioners of Trust Funds. 
Julius E. Eveleth . . . . Term expires 1911 



Charles S. Smith 
C. Lee Todd 



1912 
1913 



Tree Warden. 
Edward R. Farrar. 

Committee on Claims. 

Moorfield Storey, Julius E. Eveleth. 

Charles S. Wheeler. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

Jclius E. Eveleth .... Term expires 1911 
George Flint .... " " 1912 

C. Lee Todd « " 1913 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 
Charles S. Wheeler, Herbert E. Barnes. 

Trustees of Lincoln Library. 

Charles F. Adams, John F. Farrar, 

Charles Lee Todd, 
Charles S. Smith, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
Rev. Edward E. Bradley, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 

Registrars. 

Charles S. Smith, Robert D. Donaldson, 

C. Lee Todd, George L. Chapin. 

School Committee. 

Henry E. Warner .... Term expires 1911 

Rev. Edward E. Bradley ... " " 1912 

Edward R. Farrar .... " ." 1913 

Water Commissioners. 

George L. Chapin .... Term expires 1911 
Stephen H. Blodgett . . . . u " 1912 

Joseph S. Hart " " 1913 

Charles S. Smith, Chairman Selectmen, ex-officio. 
Charles S. Wheeler, Treasurer, ex-officio. 



Field Drivers. 

George E. Cunningham, Herbert G. Farrar, 

Robert B. Chapin. 



John F. Farrar, 



Fence Viewers. 



Martin M. Welch. 



Surveyors of Lumber. 
Richard A. Shepard. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 

Samuel Farrar, Harold S. Cousins. 

John F. Farrar. 



Cemetery Commissioners. 



Julius E. Eveleth 
Edward F. Flint 
Herbert E. Barnes 
George L. Chapin 
Charles S. Smith 



Term expires 1911 
" " 1912 

" " 1913 

" " 1914 

" " 1915 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting, held March 7, igio. 

WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Monday, 
March seventh, at 1 o'clock P.M., to act on the following 
articles, viz.: 

Article i. To chose a moderator. 

Art. 2. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

Art. 3. To choose all necessary Town Officers, Com- 
mittees, Commissioners and Trustees for the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town, and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 



Art. 5. To give in their votes by ballot in answer to 
the question: " Shall licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in this Town?" The check list shall 
be used as provided by Section 5, Chapter 100 of the 
Public Statutes. 

Art. 6. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

Art. 7. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

Art. 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February first, 
1910, in anticipation of the Collection of taxes of said 
year, such sums of money as may be necessary for the 
current expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the 
total tax levy for the said year, giving the notes of the 
Town in payment thereof, payable in one year from the 
dates thereof. All debts incurred under authority of 
this vote shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal 
year. 

Art. 9. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3 of Article 9 
of the By-Laws. 

Art. 10. To see if the Town will appoint a committee 
to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors in the 
Town, and appropriate money for the same. 

Art. 11. To sees if the Town will take such action as 
may be necessary to introduce electric lights into the 
Town, and appropriate money for the same. 



8 

Art. 12. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to repairs on the Town Hall. 

Art. 13. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to the old schoolhouse in the center of the Town. 

Art. 14. To see if the Town will continue the Special 
Committee appointed at the Special Town Meeting of 
September, 1908, to act in an advisory capacity to the 
Tree Warden, or take any other action in the matter. 

Art. 15. To see if the Town will build a culvert under 
the depot road opposite the so-called Lewis Street. 

Art. 16. To see if the Town will provide some other 
way of escape for the flow of water that comes off the so- 
called 'Tierce's Hill," opposite the stable of Mrs. A. E. 
Cousins. 



Art. 17. To see if the Town will pay for damages 
done by mad dogs. 

Art. 18. To see if the Town will give a deed to owners 
of cemetery lots. 

Art. 19. To see if the Town will take any action with 
reference to the annexation of part of the Town of 
Wayland to the Town of Lincoln. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches or some other public place, seven 
days at least before the day appointed for such meeting, 



9 

and to make seasonable return thereof with your doings 
thereon, to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-fourth day of February, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
ten. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return upon this Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, Feb. 26, 1910. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station, seven days before said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 



Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was called 
to order by the Town Clerk, and after reading the War- 
rant, the following votes were passed. 

Article i. Voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. (The check list was used.) 

Announcement was made by John F. Farrar, of the 
death of Samuel Hoar Pierce, the oldest citizen. 

It was voted that a Committee, consisting of John F. 
Farrar, Charles F. Adams, and Charles S. Smith be 
authorized to draft suitable resolutions, and that the 
same be spread upon the records of the town and a copy 
sent to the family of the deceased. 



10 

These resolutions will be found after the minutes of 
this meeting. 

Art. 2. The printed reports were taken up separately 
and each was accepted. 

The report of the Committee to investigate the acts 
of the Board of Registers of Voters was read by Dr. 
Joseph S. Hart and the report was accepted. 

Art. 3. Voted and chose. 

George L. Chapin, Town Clerk (sworn. ) 

Selectmen . — 

Charles S. Smith (sworn. ) 
C. Lee Todd (sworn. ) 
Robert D. Donaldson (sworn. ) 
Voted to omit choosing Overseers of the Poor. 

Board of Health.— 3 years. Martin M. Welch. 

Assessor. — 3 years. William C. Peirce (sworn. ) 

Town Treasurer. — Charles S. Wheeler (sworn.) 
Voted that the Town Treasurer be the Collector of 
Taxes. 

Auditor. — James W. Lennon. 

Constables. — 

James T. Laird (sworn.) 
Winslow A. Eaton (sworn. ) 
George E. Cunningham (sworn. ) 



11 

Commissioner of Trust Funds, 3 years — C. Lee Todd. 
Tree Warden. — Edward R. Farrar. 

Committee on Claims. — 

Moorfield Storey. 
Julius E. Eveleth, 

Charles S. Wheeler. 

Trustee for Bemis Fund for Free Lectures, 3 years. — 
C. Lee Todd. 

School Committee, 3 years. — Edward R. Farrar. 

Water Commissioner, 3 years. — Joseph S. Hart. 

Field Drivers. — 

George E. Cunningham (sworn. ) 
Herbert G. Farrar (sworn. ) 
Robert B. Chapin. 

Surveyor of Lumber. — Richard A. Shepard (sworn. ) 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. — 

Samuel Farrar (sworn. ) 
Harold S. Cousins (sworn. ) 
John F. Farrar (sworn. ) 

Cemetery Commissioner, 5 years. — Charles S. Smith. 

Art. 4. The following appropriations were made: — 

Schools $9,000.00 

Poor 500.00 

Highways and Bridges 5,500.00 



12 

Library, The Dog Tax and .... $400 . 00 

Interest 500.00 

Cemeteries 250.00 

Board of Health 300.00 

State Aid 48.00 

Tree Warden 100 . 00 

Miscellaneous Expense . . . ' . 4,500.00 

Gypsy Moth 400.00 

Gypsy Moth, Special Appropriation . . 2,800 . 00 
Payment of Water Bonds (To be taken from 

from Water Works' Treasury . . 1,500.00 
Sinking Fund. Water Works (To be taken 

from Water Works' Treasury . . 2,173.37 

Hydrant and Public Water Service 2,400 . 00 

Waltham Hospital . . . . . 250.00 

Street Lighting 1,000.00 

Fire Department 100.00 

School House Bonds . . . 3,000.00 

School House Bond Interest . . . 1,960.00 

Liquor Nuisance 200.00 

Legal Expenses (From Water Works' 

Treasury) 1,500.00 

Voted, That of the above appropriations, the sum of 
$1,361.93 be taken from money in the Treasury. 

Art. 5. Voted, That the Town Clerk cast one NO 
ballot for the Town. 

The polls were kept open one hour, and the Ballot 
Box used. 

The counter on the Ballot Box showed one ballot cast, 
and upon opening the said box the ballot disclosed was as 
follows:— Yes, 0. No, 1. 

Art. 6 and Art. 7 were taken up together. 

Voted, That the taxes be collected in the same way 



13 

and manner as last year, and that the compensation 
be the same as last year, viz. : \\% of the list collected. 

Art. 8. Voted, unanimously, That the Treasurer be 
and hereby is authorized, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow, during the municipal year begin- 
ning Feb. 1, 1910, in anticipation of taxes, such sums of 
money as may be necessary for the current expenses of 
the Town, but not exceeding the total levy for said year, 
giving the notes of the Town therefor, payable within 
one year after the dating thereof from the taxes of the 
present municipal year; and that the said notes be 
registered with the First National Bank, Boston, Mass. 

Art. 9. Voted to choose a Committee on Claims. 
Committee chosen under Article 3. 

Art. 10. Voted, That the Selectmen be a Committee 
to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors. 

Art. 11. Voted, That a Committee consisting of the 
Selectmen, and E. Irving Smith, and Vernon A. Wright 
be authorized on behalf of the Town, to provide by 
contract for electric lighting within the Town for not 
longer than ten years and not more than eighty street 
lights. 

Art. 12. Voted, That the matter be left in the hands 
of the Selectmen to make such repairs as they deem 
necessary. 

The Chairman of the Selectmen announced that a 
certain person, whose name he was not at liberty to 
mention, had offered to pay for the said repairs. 

It was voted that the thanks of the Town are hereby 
extended to the person who has so generously offered to 
pay for the needed repairs upon the Town Building. 



14 

Art. 13. Voted, That the matter be referred to the 
Selectmen to investigate and report to the Town. 

Art. 14. Voted to pass over the Article. 

Art. 15. Voted, That the Selectmen be authorized 
to divert the water to the opposite side of the road. 

Art. 16. Voted, That the whole matter be referred 
to the Selectmen, with full powers. 

Art. 17. Voted, That the matter be referred to the 
Committee on Claims. 

Art. 18. Voted, That a Committee of Three be ap- 
pointed by the chair to look into the matter and report 
to the Town. 

Committee appointed : — 

Anthony J. Doherty James T. Calkins 

E. Irving Smith. 

Art. 19. Voted to leave the matter with the Select- 
men to investigate and report to the Town. 

Voted to adjourn. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 
Town Clerk. 

March 29, 1910. Matthew H. Doherty was this day 
sworn as Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



15 

March 30, 1910. John F. Farrar was this day sworn 
as Superintendent of Streets for the year ensuing. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



March 30, 1910. John F. Farrar was this day sworn 
as Special Police for the year ensuing. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



March 30, 1910. John F. Farrar was this day sworn 
as Forest Fire Warden for the ensuing year. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



16 



Report of the Committee to draft resolutions upon the 
death of Samuel H. Pierce. 



At the recent annual Town Meeting, held March 7, 
it was announced that Samuel Hoar Pierce had died on 
the Saturday preceeding, being then far advanced in 
his ninetieth year; and, thereupon, a committee, con- 
sisting of the undersigned, was appointed to draft an 
expression of the sense of deep regret with which the 
announcement had been received. 

Now, therefore, in pursuance of the vote above re- 
ferred to, the following is submitted for entry in the 
Town Records: 

Born in Cambridge, July 11, 1820, Samuel Hoar 
Pierce was, no less by descent than by residence, identi- 
fied with Lincoln throughout his mature and active life. 
Sprung in direct male line from Charles Hoare, in 1634 
Sheriff of Gloucester, England, Mr. Pierce, a New 
Englander by both father and mother's sides through six 
generations of ancestors born on the soil, as a man and a 
citizen was distinctly typical of the Massachusetts Town 
Meeting period, now largely replaced by city form of 
government. Of that period he was a survival, the last in 
Lincoln. Public spirited, conscientiously faithful and 
scrupulously honest in the discharge of civic and official 
functions, he was of those, who, in their generations, did 
for the towns in which they lived as they did for them- 
selves. 

Chairman of the Board of Water Commissioners, 
Member of the Board of Selectmen, Member of the School 



17 

Committee, Trustee of the Public Library, Represen- 
tative in the General Court, — in each capacity, Mr. 
Pierce safeguarded the interests of the public as if his 
own. He was one of those through whose foresight, the 
prior rights in the water supply within its borders were 
by law specifically reserved to it. 

By predilection and calling an agriculturist, his skill 
and knowledge were ever at the service of his fellow- 
townsmen. Influential in all municipal matters, he was 
in his day easily a leader in Town meeting; shrewd in 
council, he was in speech keen, incisive, logical. With a 
natural instinct for the legal point of view, his strength 
lay in an inborn common sense. Generous after the 
New England fashion, he was ever ready to lend assist- 
ance to those associated with him. Scorning secret 
detraction, his contemporaries bore evidence to the 
charm of his personality. Though the field of his activi- 
ties was confined and local, nature had so fashioned him, 
that had occasion offered, he would, no less than his 
Concord kinsman of the same generation, have bore a 
not inconspicuous part in larger forums. 

Therefore, the foregoing is, by direction of the citizens 
of Lincoln in town meeting assembled, to be now entered 
in full on the Town records as a lasting testimonial to 
the life, character, and work of yet another member of a 
generation that is gone, — a useful citizen, a faithful 
official and a true man of the pure Massachusetts stock. 
A copy of the foregoing will also, in accordance with 
the vote of the Town, be communicated to the family of 
Mr. Pierce. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, 
CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS, 
CHARLES S. SMITH, 

Committee, 



18 



List of Jurors for the year 1910 as prepared by the 
Selectmen : — 

P. 0. Address. 



James E. Baker, 
Walter F. Baker, 
Wallace M. Brooks, 
John T. Clark, 
Harold S. Cousins, 
J. Elliot Bryant, 
George E. Cunningham, 
Robert D. Donaldson, 
Matthew H. Doherty, 
Herbert G. Farrar, 
Mason P. Hunter, 
Eugene Jose, 
Roderick B. Laird, 
Patrick J. Lennon, 
Charles E. Nelson, 
Edwin B. Rice, 
Daniel H. Sherman, 
William H. Sherman, 
Howard Snelling, 
Martin M. Welch, 
Charles S. Wheeler, 
Hermon T. Wheeler, 



South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

Waltham, R.F.D. 

Concord, R.F.D 

Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln. 

Waltham, R.F.D. 

Concord, R.F.D. 

Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

Lexington, R.F.D. 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lexington, R.F.D. 



A true copy. 



CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

Lincoln, July 1, 1910. 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk, 



19 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held, Sept. 6, 1910, 

WARRANT. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Tuesday, 
September sixth, at 7.30 o'clock P.M., to act on the 
following articles, viz. : 

Article 1. To choose a Moderator. 

Art. 2. To see if the Town will accept and allow the 
way as altered and laid out by the Selectmen in accord- 
ance with a plan filed with the Town Clerk seven days 
previous to this meeting, from the corner of the Weston 
and Station Roads on the Station Road to the new school- 
house lot. 

Art. 3. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to the order of the County Commissioners 
with respect to Lee's Bridge. 



20 

Art. 4. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
to advise with the Tree Warden in regard to trimming 
trees on streets where there are electric light wires. 

Art. 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Select- 
men to apply to the next General Court to revise Chapter 
188 of the Acts of 1872, so that the Town may have but 
three Water Commissioners to be elected, instead of five 
members, as at present. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches, or some other public place, seven 
days at least before the day appointed for such meeting, 
and to make seasonable return thereof with your doings 
thereon, to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-sixth day of August in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and ten. 

C. S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows : — 

Lincoln, Aug. 27, 1910. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and one in the 
Railroad Station seven days before said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 
Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Town Clerk, and after reading the 
Warrant, the following votes were passed: — 



21 

Article i. Voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. (The Check List was used. ) 

Art. 2. Voted, unanimously, That the Town do 
accept and allow the way as laid out by the Selectmen 
from the corner opposite the house of Mr. Barnes to 
the new school house lot, according to a plan filed with 
the Town Clerk, seven days before this meeting. 

Voted, That the Selectmen be authorized and directed 
to widen and construct the road substantially according 
to the plan filed with the Town Clerk. 

Art. 3. Voted, That the whole matter be left with 
the Selectmen to act at their discretion. 

Art. 4. Voted, That a Committee of Three be ap- 
pointed to advise with the Tree Warden in regard to 
the trimming of trees along the line of the electric light 
wires. 

Voted, That the Selectmen be the Committee. 

Art. 5. Voted, That the Selectmen be authorized to 
apply to the next General Court to revise Chapter 188 
of the Acts of 1872, so that the Town may have but three 
Water Commissioners instead of five members, as at 
present. 

The following resolution was unanimously passed: 

• Resolved, That the Town of Lincoln, in Town Meeting 
assembled, hereby protests against the telephone rates 
suggested by the Highway Commissioners, and about 
to be adopted by the New England Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company, and requests the Selectmen to adopt 
all proper measures to procure amendment of the same. 

Voted to dissolve the meeting. 

Attest: GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



22 



Proceedings of the State Election, held November 8, 191 o 

WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in the 
election of State and County Officers to assemble at 
Bemis Hall, on Tuesday, November 8th at seven o'clock 
in the forenoon, to give in their votes for the following 
officers, viz. : Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Secretary, 
Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney-General, Representative 
in Congress, to fill vacancy, Councillor, Senator, Repre- 
sentative in General Court from the 13th Middlesex 
District, District Attorney, Sheriff; and any other 
officers required by law to be chosen in the month of 
November of the current year; also, to vote on the 
question of direct nominations. 

All officers enumerated above are to be designated and 
voted for on one ballot, the polls to be opened at seven 
o'clock A.M., and may be closed at four o'clock P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Officer and 



23 

one of the churches, or in some other public place, seven 
days at least before the day appointed for said meeting, 
and to make seasonable return thereof with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk. 



HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-fourth day of October, 
in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and ten. 



CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



The return on the Warrant is as follows :— 

Lincoln, Oct. 29, 1910. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station, seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, who 
read the Warrant, and after administering the oath to 
Thomas L. Giles as Teller, and James W. Lennon and 
Hermon T. Wheeler as Ballot Clerks, declared the polls 
opened. 

The Ballot Box was opened and examined, showing 
nothing in the Box and the Counters read 000. The 



24 

keys to the Ballot Box were delivered to the presiding 
officer, who kept them during the voting. 

The Ballot Box was opened three times during the 
balloting and each time fifty ballots were taken out, 
counted and immediately sealed. 

The polls were closed at 4.30 o'clock P.M., the counter 
on the Ballot Box showing 194 ballots cast. Upon 
counting the last block of ballots it disclosed one hundred 
and ninety-four ballots cast, which were counted and the 
declaration of the vote made in open meeting as follows : 

GOVERNOR.— 



Eben S. Draper of Hopedale, 


113 votes 


Eugene N. Foss of Boston, Democratic, 


72 " 


Eugene N. Foss of Boston, 




Dem. Pro. Nom. Papers, 


3 " 


John A. Nichols of Boston, 


1 vote 


Daniel A. White of Brockton, 


2 votes 


Blanks, 


3 " 


LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 




Thomas F. Cassidy of Adams, 


58 votes 


Louis A. Frothingham of Boston, 


107 " 


Henry C. Hess of Boston, 


1 vote 


Patrick Mahoney of Cambridge, 


3 votes 


William G. Merrill of Maiden, 


1 vote 


Blanks, 


24 votes 


SECRETARY.— 




Horriet D'Orsay of Lynn, 


2 votes 


Charles J. Martell of Boston, 


60 " 


Andrew Martensen of Somerville, 


1 vote 


William M. Olin of Boston, 


110 votes 


William E. Thomas of Boston, 


1 vote 


Blanks, 


20 votes 



25 



TREASURER.— 

Thomas A. Frissell, of Hinsdale, 
Sylvester J. McBride of Watertown, 
Benjamin F. Peach of Lynn, 
Elmer A. Stevens of Somerville, 
Blanks, 

AUDITOR.— 

John Hill of Worcester, 
Ambrose Miles of Lynn, 
Charles J. Paine of Barnstable, 
Henry E. Turner 
Blanks, 

ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 

Dennis McGoff, 
Harold Metcalf, 
John B. Ratigan, 
James M. Swift, 
Blanks, 



1 vote 


3 votes 


61 


it 


107 


n 


22 


n 


2 votes 


3 


it 


64 


a 


98 


a 


27 


(( 


1 vote 


3 votes 


59 


ft 


106 


u 


25 


it 



CONGRESSMAN, Fourth District.— 
(For regular term. ) 

John J. Mitchell of Marlborough, 
James D. Ryan of Fitchburg, 
William H. Wilder of Gardner, 
Blanks, 



89 votes 
1 vote 
94 votes 
10 " 



CONGRESSMAN, Fourth District. 
(To fill vacancy, unexpired term. ) 

John J. Mitchell of Marlborough, 
William H. Wilder of Gardner, 
Blanks, 



88 votes 
93 " 
13 " 



26 
COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 
Herbert E. Fletcher of Westford, 101 votes 
J. Kelso Mairs of Waltham, 63 " 
Blanks, 30 " 

SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District — 

Edwin A. Bayley of Lexington 79 votes 

Roger Sherman Hoar of Concord 98 " 

Blanks, 17 " 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT.— 

Thirteenth Middlesex District. — 

Anthony J. Doherty of Lincoln, 112 votes 

Waldo L. Stone of Sudbury, 68 " 

Blanks, 14 " 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex District— 
(For regular term. ) 

Charles H. Richardson of Lowell, 95 votes 

Dexter C. Whittemore of Carlisle, 71 " 

Blanks, 28 " 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex District— 
(To fill vacancy, unexpired term. ) 

Winthrop H. Fairbanks of Sudbury, 88 votes 

Chester B. Williams of Wayland, " 85 " 

Blanks, 21 " 

ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONERS, Middlesex County.— 

Leander V. Calahan of Stoneham, 54 votes 

Joseph L. Main of Lowell, 50 " 

Frank A. Patch of Littleton, 84 " 
Edward Everett Thompson of Woburn, 68 " 

Blanks, 36 " 



27 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY, Northern District.— 

John J. Higgins of Somerville, 102 votes 

James J. Irwine of Everett, 65 " 

Blanks, 27 " 

SHERIFF MIDDLESEX COUNTY.— 

John R. Fairbairn of Cambridge, 108 votes 

Whitfield L. Tuck of Winchester, 60 " 

Blanks, 26 " 



Shall nomination by political parties of candidate for 
the office of Representative in this district be by direct 
plurality vote? 

Yes 90 

No . 16 

Blank .88 

Voted to adjourn. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Upon petition of ten legal voters for a recount of the 
votes cast at the annual election for Representative in 
Congress, Fourth District, for both terms. 

Notices were sent to the respective candidates and a 
recount was held in the Selectmen's office, Nov. 17 at 
8 o'clock. 

Mr. Mitchell and Mr. Wilder were both represented. 

The recount of the ballots was as follows : — 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, Fourth 
District. — (Regular Term. ) 

John J. Mitchell of Marlborough, 89 votes 

William H. Wilder of Gardner 94 " 
James D. Ryan of Fitchburg, 1 vote 

Blank, 10 votes 



28 

(To fill vacancy, unexpired term. ) 

John J. Mitchell of Marlborough, 87 votes 

William H. Wilder of Gardner, 93 " 

Blank, 14 " 

A certificate of the recount was made and returned 
to the Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

Attest: GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Vote of District No. 13, Middlesex, for Representa- 
tive to the General Court as obtained and declared at 
the Town Clerk's Meeting for said district held in Con- 
cord, Nov. 18 at 12 o'clock noon. 

Bed. Con. Lin. Sud. Way. Wes. Total 
A. J. Doherty 

of Lincoln, 47 360 112 42 173 62 796 
Waldo L. Stone 

ofSubdury, 127 456 68 149 249 233 1,282 

Blanks, 20 72 14 11 39 20 176 

Total, 194 888 194 202 461 315 2,254 

Two certificates of election of Waldo L. Stone of 
Sudbury were signed by 

Abbott R. Webber, Town Clerk of Bedford. 
Walter A. Carr, Town Clerk of Concord. 
George L. Chapin, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Frank F. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 
Daniel Brackett, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
George W. Cutting, Town Clerk of Weston. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



29 

There have been recorded during the year ending 
Dec. 31, 1910, 26 Births, 10 Marriages, 16 Deaths. 



Births Registered. 



Date of Birth. 


Name of Child. 


Name of Parents. 


June 


15, 1908. 


Charles Amyas Snelling. 


S. Rodman and Marion L. (Bamforth. ) 


Jan. 


15, 1909. 


Eleanor Rodman Snelling. 


Howard and Eleanor G. (Goodwin. ) 


Jan. 


12,1910. 


Maria Osaria Catoni 


Nikoli and Carolina (Morarchi. ) 


Feb. 


15, " 


Gertrude Cousins. 


Harold S. and Bessie M. (Sherman.) 


Mar. 


13, " 


Astrid Helen Elsie Handberg. 


Carl S. and Mary (McTighe. ) 


Jan. 


27, " 


John Todd. 


Chas. Lee and Mary Pauline (Eveleth. ) 


Mar. 


12, " 


Joseph Alexander Lennon. 


Partick J. and Mary J. (MacDonald. ) 


April 


4, " 


William Francis Diamond. 


James and Catherine (Fahey. ) 


May 


12, " 


Duncan Guy Chapman. 


Duncan G. and Lily (Topliss. ) 


June 


4, " 


Fioro Campobasso. 


Guiseppe and Anna (DiMeo.) 


June 


16, " 


Lawrence Thomas Allen. 


Patrick and Mary E. (Kelly.) 


June 


21, " 


Charles Edward Gosselin. 


Peter and Mary A. (Lawrence.) 


June 


24, " 


John Albert Cunningham. 


Geo. E. and Elizabeth M. (McKinley. ) 


June 


22, " 


Joseph Storer Hart. 


Joseph S. and Harriet L. (Darling. ) 


June 


24, " 


Francis Loretta Rooney. 


John W. Jr. and Mary C. (Shelby. ) 


July 


27, " 


Arlem Whiting. 


Oral J. and Carrie A. (McKusick. ) 


Aug. 


14, " 


Lillian Wistrand. 


Godfrey and Anna (Johnson. ) 


Aug. 


28, " 


Elizabeth Gertrude Harris. 


William P. and Ida (Tyler.) 


Sept. 


4, " 


Frederic Ivor Grant. 


Fred and Alice S. (Gibbons. ) 


Oct. 


19. " 


Margaret Farrar. 


Herbert G. and Edith (Biggs.) 
Charles H. and Alice M. (Cousins.) 


Nov. 


4, " 


Albert Edward Bamforth. 


Nov. 


19, " 


Richard Pollard. 


Mary Jane (Rooney) Pollard. 


Dec. 


8. " 


Ruby Lillian Rolls. 


Richard W. and Ellen (Toplass.) 


Dec. 


12, " 


f Margaret Lennon. 
\ Ruth Lennon. 


James W. and Frances M. (Carey. ) 


Dec. 


22, " 


Mary Flanagan. 


Thomas J. and Margaret (Thornton. ) 



30 



Marriages Registered. 



Date of Marriage. 


Names. 


Residence. 


Jan. 5,1910. f 


William Russell Cameron. 
Louise Esther Harding. 


Woburn. 
Lincoln. 


Mar. 31, " J 


Percy Whiting Brown. 
Corinne Banks Davis. 


Concord. 
Lincoln. 


April 2, " f 


Ernest Neukus. 
Elin Olivia Erikson. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


June 8, " f 


Harold Edward Clapp. 
Edna Gertrude Woodward. 


Lincoln. 
Greenfield. 


June 28, " f 


Charles F. Foreman. 
Annie M. Limond. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


July 14, " f 


William P. Harris. 
Ida Tyler. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Oct, 27, " | 


James Thompson. 
Marie Henry. 


Newport, R, I. 
Lincoln. 


Nov. 22, " f 


Martin Corrigan. 
Annie L. Dempsey. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Nov. 23, " 1 


Michael P. Delorey. 
Louise Haggerty. 


Lincoln. 
Concord. 


Dec. 21, " \ 


M. Francis Underwood. 
Harriet May Linthwaite. 


Lincoln. 
Waltham. 



31 



Deaths Registered, 



Date of Death. 


Name. 


• 
Y. 


A.ge. 
M. 


D. 


Jan. 4, 1910. 


Margaret J. Weir. 


32 


6 




Jan. 8, " 


Richard Delehanty. 


76 


8 


4 


Jan. 22, " 


Blanche E. Tyler. 


18 


1 


3 


Mar. 5, " 


Samuel Hoar Pierce. 


89 


8 





Apr. 5, " 


John Howard Pierce. 


80 








Apr. 21, " 


Elizabeth Martin. 


68 








May 20, " 


John Morrisy. 











June 17, " 


Jane V. L. Boyce. 


31 


10 


26 


June 22, " 


William Besbee. 


About 40. 




June 24, 


John Albert Cunningham. 











July 10, " 


Helen F. V. V. Warren. 


51 


3 


7 


Aug. 9, " 


Florence Elizabeth Bunker. 


5 





19 


Sept. 22, " 


Annie Sweeney. 


65 








Oct. 4, " 


Matilda Sophia Tasker. 


75 


8 





Oct. 4, " 


Louisa Arabella Jones. 


73 


5 


U 


Dec. 26, " 


Michael Murphy. 


71 









32 



EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS, Chap. 29. 

Sect. 3. Physicians and mid wives shall on or before 
the fifth day of each month, report to the Clerk of each 
City or Town a correct list of all children born therein 
during the preceding month at whose birth they were pres- 
ent, stating the date and place of each birth, the name, if 
any, of the child, its sex and color, and the name, place of 
birth and residence of the parents, the maiden name of the 
mother, and the occupation of the father. A physician or 
midwife who neglects to report such list on or before the 
fifteenth day of the month shall for each offence forfeit not 
more than twenty-five dollars. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the 
birth of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to be 
given to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such child 
is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other 
person who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be 
given notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for 
ten days after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not 
more than five dollars for such offence. 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1910. 

There have been 166 licenses issued as follows: — 145 
Males, 18 Females, 2 Spayed Females and 1 Kennel, for 
which $400.80 have been paid to the County Treasurer. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

County Clerk. 



33 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN. 



The Selectmen have the honor to present the following 
report for the fiscal year ending January 31, 1911: — 

The Board was organized at a special meeting by the 
choice of Charles S. Smith, Chairman, and R. D. Donald- 
son, Secretary. 

The following table gives the appropriations made by 
the Town during the year 1910, and the appropriations 
recommended by the Board to be made at the next 
Annual Meeting :- 



For 





Appropriations 
for 1910, 


The Selectmen 
recommends 
the following 
appropriations 
for the ensuing 
year. 


Schools, 


$9,000.00 


$9,000.00 


Support of Poor, 


500.00 


500.00 


Highways and Bridges, 


5,500 00 


5,500.00 


Special Highways, 




1,000.00 


Library, Dog Tax, and 


400.00 


400.00 


Interest, 


500.00 


500.00 


Cemeteries, 


250.00 


250.00 


Board of Health, 


300.00 


300.00 


Tree Warden, 


3,300.00 


3,300.00 


State Aid, 


48.00 


48.00 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


4,500.00 


4,500.00 


Payment of Water Bonds, 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


Sinking Fund, Water, 


2,173.37 


2,173.37 


Hydrant and other public 






water service, 


2,400.00 


2,400.00 



34 

Waltham Hospital, Free Bed, $250 . 00 $250 . 00 

Street Lamps, 1,000.00 1,061 . 10 

Fire Department, 100 . 00 100 . 00 

Payment new school- 
house bonds, 3,000 . 00 3,000 . 00 

Payment Interest New 

School House Bonds, 1,960 .00 1,840 .00 

Legal Expenses in Suit 

against Town of Concord, 1,500.00 

Suppression Liquor Nuisance, 200 . 00 200 . 00 



APPOINTMENTS. 

Burial Agent, H. E. Barnes. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Special Police, James E. Baker, John W. Rocks, John 
F. Farrar, Joseph DeLory, William A. Harding, William 
E. Chute. 

Forest Fire Wardens, Charles S. Smith, C. Lee Todd ; 
R. D. Donaldson, I. N. MacRae, John F. Farrar, James 
E. Baker, Wallace M. Brooks, Charles S. Wheeler. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at Annual State Election * 
James W. Lennon, Herman T. Wheeler, Thomas L. 
Giles. 

Superintendent of Streets, John F. Farrar. 

Janitor of Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 



35 



FINANCES. 



The Town now has a net bonded debt on account of 
its Water Department of $82,500.00, as follows:— 

Issue of 



1894, 


$4,000.00, 


due one each 


year. 


1897, 


10,000,00, 


4% bonds, 


due 1917. 


1900, 


23,000.00, 


3i% " 


" 1930. 


1902, 


9,000.00, 


3'i% " 


" 1932. 


1903, 


5,000.00, 


4% 


" 1933. 


1904, 


5,000.00, 


4% 


" 1934. 


1906, 


14,000.00, 


4% 


" 1936. 


1907, 


4,000.00, 


4% 


u 1937. 


>en $500.00 bonds, 


$8,500.00, one each year 



Total bonded indebtedness, $82,500.00. 

From this total indebtedness should be deducted the 
amount of money now in the Sinking Fund, to retire 
issues of 1897, 1900, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1906, land 1907, at 
maturity. 

The total bond issue on account of the new school house 
was $55,000.00, of which $9,000.00 has been retired, 
leaving a net bonded indebtedness on this account, 
January 1, 1911, of $46,000.00. 

It will be necessary for the Town to appropriate 
$3,000.00 to retire bonds this year, also to appropriate 
$1,840.00 on account of interest on the $46,000.00 out- 
standing bonds. 

The Town Treasurer's report shows that he has in the 
treasury $4,650.27 and that there are uncollected taxes 
amounting to $3,598.64. 



APPROPRIATIONS. 

It will be observed that two of the Appropriations 
Accounts have been overdrawn. Highway expenditures, 
apparently, have been some $1,500.00 in excess of the 
appropriation, but the following items have been charged 



$512 94 


395 


00 


225 


00 


58 


81 



36 

to Highway Appropriation, which we believe it was not 
contemplated should be paid from this appropriation: 

Standard Oil Co., Road Oil, 
Studebaker Bros. Co., 1-600 gallon Sprinkler, 
Good Road Machine Co., Scraper, 
Thos. E. Coburn, Oil Wagon, 

$1,191 75 

The Highway Department has a credit in the Town 
Treasurer's Account for labor performed outside of the 
department of $234.23. Taking into consideration these 
various items and the credit above referred to, it will 
be seen that the Highway Department has expended 
slightly more than the appropriation. 

Miscellaneous Account shows payments of $5,500.00 
more than the appropriation, this account has been 
charged with itens which ordinarily would not be charged 
to Miscellaneous and which would not have been charged 
in this case had there been any specific appropriation 
made for the following items: — 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, 
Geo. W. Cutting, Surveying, 
Whitman & Howard, Surveying, 
I. N. MacRae, Heating Town Hall, 
I. N. MacRae, Plumbing Town Hall, 
Harry J. Cooper, Wiring Town Hall, 
Harry J. Cooper, Extra Wiring Town Hall, 
Hanley & Goulding, Painting Town Hall, 
Hanley & Goulding, Extra Painting Town Hall 
Pettingell Andrews Co., Electric Fixtures, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Town Hall, 

$6,178 28 



$3,589 05 


21 


95 


26 20 


736 


00 


125 


00 


316 35 


162 


32 


375 


00 


dl, 11 


15 


166 50 


648 


76 



37 

Taking out the amount of the items above referred to, 
it will be observed that the appropriation made for 
Miscellaneous Expense was not expended. 

We think there is cause for satisfaction that, notwith- 
standing the large payments which have been made 
during the past year, for which no specific appropriations 
were made, including the above items, and $1,000.00, 
which has been paid on account of widening the new 
road, the surplus in the treasury is so large and the 
general finances of the town are in such good condition. 

We again recommend that the Town observe the 
strictest economy in connection with the appropriations 
to be made, consistent with keeping all the departments 
in good running condition and consistent with conser- 
vative progress. 

SUPPORT OF POOR. 

In January, 1910, one of the minor children being 
supported by the Town died, so that the Town has fully 
supported during the year only one of the Preble children, 
at an expense of $94.01 . 

The Town has also contributed toward the support of 
other citizens, as per the Auditor's Report. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

This department has been conducted during the year 
as heretofore. For a more detailed report we refer you 
to the Report of the Fire Engineer. 

We are glad to notice that the forest fires have not 
been so extensive in the Town this year as in previous 
years. 

TREE WARDEN. 

Detailed report of the work of the Tree Warden has 
been made to which we respectfully refer you. 



38 
HIGHWAYS. 

Mr. John F. Farrar was appointed by the Selectmen 
and has served the Town during the past year as in 
previous years. Mr. Daniel H. Sherman had charge of 
the highways during the summer months. 

The increased use of automobiles has a tendency to 
impair the quality of the roads and the appropriation 
which the Town makes does not seem to be sufficient to 
keep the roads in the usual good condition. 

During the year oil was sprinkled on a portion of the 
highway, with 'apparently very good results, having a 
tendency to make a hard surface, besides eliminating the 
dust very largely. It is questionable whether, in a wet 
season, the results obtained from the application of oil 
would be as good as in the past season, which was ex- 
ceptionally dry. We would recommend, however, fur- 
ther experiments with oil on the highways. 

In the matter of Lee's Bridge, to w T hich reference was 
made in the last annual report, the County Commission- 
ers issued an order respecting the said bridge, copy of 
which we print herewith. 

(Copy. ) 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Middlesex, ss. 

At a meeting of the County Commissioners for the 
County of Middlesex, holden at Cambridge, within and 
for said County, on the first Tuesday of June, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and ten, 
Charles F. Adams of Lincoln, and others, and Frank 
Wheeler of Concord, and others, in said County, by their 
petitions to said Commissioners — among other matters — 
pray that the road leading from South Lincoln through 



39 

Nine Acre corner in Concord, to Maynard and Stowe, 
where it crosses the Sudbury River at Lee's Bridge, -may 
be altered and specifically repaired, etc., as will more 
fully appear, reference being had to the petitions filed 
of record in the case. 

The petition of Adams, et al, was presented to the 
County Commissioners at their meeting holden at Cam- 
bridge, within and for said County, on the first Tuesday 
of June, A.D. 1909, and the petition of Wheeler and 
others, 'at the meeting holden at Lowell on the first 
Tuesday of September, 1909, and on each petition orders 
of notice were issued and views and hearings had in the 
premises. At an adjourned meeting, to wit: at Cam- 
bridge on the 30th day of November, 1909, said altera- 
tions and specific repairs were adjudged of common 
convenience and necessity, and thence said petitions were 
continued to this time. 

And now the said Commissioners make return of their 
proceedings in the premises, as follows: said Commission- 
ers having given notice as the law directs, met at the 
Court House in said Cambridge, on the eleventh day of 
January, in the year nineteen hundred and ten, when and 
where the parties appeared. 

The premises having been examined, and the parties 
fully heard, said Commissioners proceeded to alter said 
highway as prayed for in said petitions, and the following 
description is a true description of said highway as hereby 
altered. 

The southerly line of said highway as hereby altered 
is defined as follows: Said alteration is shown on a plan 
accompanying this return. Beginning at a point on the 
southerly side of said highway in Concord, said point 
being distant 53.9 feet from a stake marking the northerly 
fine of said highway at its intersection with the easterly 
line of an old road sometimes called the Garfield Road, 
thence from said point on a curve of 458.96 feet radius 



40 

bearing to the left 192.92 feet to a point, thence South 
62°35 / East crossing the Sudbury River 374.4 feet to a 
point, thence on a curve of 382.50 feet radius bearing 
to the right 138.43 feet to a point about 5.6 feet south- 
erly of the wall on the south side of the highway in 
Lincoln. 

The northerly line beginning at the stake to which 
reference is made above at the intersection of Garfield 
Road is thence South 38° East 20.13 feet to a point oppo- 
site to and 50 feet distant from the point of beginning of 
the above described southerly line, thence parallel to said 
southerly line and 50 feet distant therefrom 175.47 feet, 
thence following the line of the stone walls bounding the 
northerly side of the present highway about 200 feet to 
the river, thence across the river by the northerly rail 
thereof about 95 feet and thence following the present 
northerly side of said highway (and as shown on the 
plan) about 150 feet, thence by a curve of 303.48 feet 
radius bearing to the right 50 feet to a point, thence South 
41°50'30" East 50 feet to a point opposite to and 40 feet 
distant from the terminus of the above described south- 
erly line. 

The above courses are reckoned from the magnetic me- 
ridian and the description is intended to conform to a 
plan showing the premises, dated 1910, and signed by the 
Commissioners. A copy of the plan is to be filed with 
town clerks of the respective towns of Concord and Lin- 
coln. And said Commissioners determine and order that 
the said towns of Concord and Lincoln shall on or before 
the first day of November, 1910, construct a new bridge 
across the Sudbury River having a clear width of road- 
way of not less than 21 feet. Said bridge shall be of 
concrete or concrete reinforced with steel. The center 
line of said bridge shall be parallel with the southerly 
line above described and 30 feet northerly therefrom. 
The approaches to said bridge shall be 21 feet in width 



41 

and as shown by plan, suitably crowned, drained and 
graded, and said approaches shall join and conform to 
the new bridge as shown on the plan. 

By the above arrangement the new bridge will be just 
southerly of the old bridge, and the old bridge and its 
approaches are to remain to carry the traffic until the 
new bridge and its approaches are completed. The old 
bridge shall then be removed. 

The approaches shall be gravelled or macademized to a 
suitable depth to secure a hard, smooth surface. Guard 
rails shall be erected where necessary equivalent to the 
guard rails usually erected on state highways. The ledge 
on the Concord side of the river shall be removed to such 
an extent as to secure the proper lines for the approach 
and as shown by the plan. Said Commissioners allow 
until the first day of August next to remove wood, 
timber or trees which may obstruct the building of the 
way as prescribed by Section 8 of Chapter 48 of the 
Revised Laws. 

The Commissioners find that no damages are sus- 
tained and none are awarded. 

And whereas by Chapter 20 of the Acts of the Legis- 
lature of the year A.D. 1783, the same being entitled "An 
Act for ratifying and confirming an agreement between 
the towns of Concord and Lincoln, for the more conven- 
ient building and repairing the bridges over the great 
river in said towns," it is prescribed that the said towns 
of Lincoln and Concord shall build and maintain certain 
respective proportions of the bridge, all as specified in 
said act, and whereas Concord's proportion consists of 
the portion of said bridge westerly of a line which as 
fifteen feet into the river from the old stone abutment 
on the Concord side of the river, now, therefore, said 
Commissioners find that the town of Concord shall pay 
for all the work westerly of the line specified, and the 



42 

town of Lincoln shall pay for all the work easterly of the 
line specified, as nearly as can be ascertained. 

And said Commissioners recommend that the Board of 
Road Commissioners of the Town of Concord and the 
Board of Selectmen of the town of Lincoln shall proceed 
to make a contract for the construction of said bridge, if 
authorized by said towns, and that payments therefor 
be made as follows, viz: of the total cost of said bridge 
without the approaches, the town of Lincoln shall pay 
five-eighths or 62i%, and the town of Concord shall 
pay three-eighths or 37J%, the said proportions being 
estimated on the basis of the law above set forth from the 
design of a concrete bridge made under the direction of 
the Commissioners. This proposed arrangement does 
not preclude any other agreement which the towns may 
decide upon as to proportional payments in the premises 
for a bridge as specified in this return. The cost of the 
approach on the Lincoln side of the river and all other 
work in the town of Lincoln to be paid for by said town. 
The cost of the approach on the Concord side of the river 
and all other work in the town of Concord to be paid for 
by the town of Concord. 

On the completion of the work to the acceptance of 
the Commissioners the County of Middlesex shall pay 
the town of Lincoln fifteen hundred dollars, and the 
town of Concord one thousand dollars. 

And said highway as thus altered is to be a public 
highway. 

At the commencement of these proceedings, and at the 
view and hearing, Samuel 0. Upham who was then a 
County Commissioner, was unable to attend, and the 
other members of the Board gave notice to Frank A. 
Patch, an Associate Commissioner, who continued to act 
as a member of said Board during these proceedings. 

In Witness Whereof, we, the said County Commission- 



43 

ers, have hereunto set our hands this twenty-fifth day of 
June in the yearof our Lord one thousand nine hundred 
and ten. 

LEVI S. GOULD. 

CHAS. H. RICHADRSON. 

FRANK A. PATCH. 

A true copy of record. 

Attest: (Sd.) RALPH N. SMITH, 

Ass't. Clerk. 

After this order was issued the Selectmen, in con- 
junction with the Road Commissioners of the town of 
Concord, asked Mr. J. R. Worcester, an engineer of high 
standing, to make certain investigations in regard to the 
location of Lee's Bridge and the expense involved in 
erecting a concrete bridge over the river, both in the 
old location and in the new, which was provided for in 
the County Commissioners' order, and we print herewith 
the letter of Mr. Worcester, covering this matter. 



(Copy. ) 

August 24, 1910. 
Mr. Charles S. Smith, 

Old Dominion Copper Co., 

% 50 Congress St., Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir: — 

In answer to your question as to my general impression 
with regard to the location of the Lee's Bridge, I would 
say that I have been unable to see any adequate reason 
for removing it from its present position. The only ex- 
cuse which I have heard advanced is that the alinement at 
the Concord end might be improved. This does not ap- 



44 

pear to me to be a sufficient reason, as the curve could 
easily be improved so as not to be dangerous, by remov- 
ing a portion of the ledge on the north side of the road. 

On the other hand, the change in alinement proposed 
by the County Commissioners would destroy a line of 
trees on one side of the road and make the trees on the 
other side at varying distances from the road, so that 
they would look meaningless and might as well be cut 
down. The remains of the old fill, unlesss removed, would 
also be an eye-sore. Considering the fact that the ex- 
pense of moving the bridge would be very considerable, 
and the advantage to be gained not sufficient to offset 
the disadvantage, seems to me that it would be far 
better to leave it where it is. 

Yours truly, 
(Si) J. R.WORCESTER. 

The opinion of the Board of Selectmen is in accord 
with Mr. Worcester's opinion and efforts will be made to 
have the County Commissioners so amend their order as 
to allow the building of the bridge on the old location, 
and we recommend that a suitable appropriation be 
made this year for that purpose. 

An article has been inserted in the warrant covering 
this matter. 



REPAIRS ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

During the year extensive repairs and alterations have 
been made on the Town House. New heating apparatus 
has been installed, including two large hot air furnaces 
and one steam furnace, for heating the offices and other 
places where the water pipes are exposed. 



45 

The repairs were thorough and included excavating for 
a basement and building of the foundation wall, together 
with all the supports necessary, enlarging, lighting, and 
ventilating the gallery, and the remodelling of a large 
section of the lower part of the building. The total ex- 
pense of this work was $4,6*48.76, $4,000.00 of which was 
provided by Miss Julia A. Bemis. The Selectmen wish 
to express their thanks to Miss Bemis for this generous 
contribution of money for this purpose and we trust 
the Town will pass suitable votes in connection there- 
with. The heating apparatus and plumbing cost 
$888.00. Besides this, the Selectmen have had the 
building wired and fixtures installed for electricity and 
the building is now equipped with elecrtic lights. The 
total cost of all the improvements, including the special 
repairs and painting has been $6,568.28. 

The hall is now in better condition, we believe, than 
when it was first constructed and it will not be necessary, 
in our opinion, to expend any considerable amount of 
money on it for many years. 



WIDENING OF STATION ROAD. 

After the repairs on the hall were completed there was a 
large amount of material which had been taken out in 
excavating for the basement which was not valuable for 
road construction purposes, but could be well utilized 
where a fill was to be made. There was also additional 
material which could be used for this purpose, adjoining 
Mr. Storey's land, opposite the farm buildings of Mr. 
DeNormandie, also a large quantity of available stone 
near Mr. Pope's land in the center of the town. 

The schoolhouse having been located on the Station 
Road, increasing the travel on that road, especially of 
children, it seemed advisable to the Selectmen that the 



46 

road as far as the schoolhouse lot should be widened. 
There was also another reason for undertaking the work 
at this time besides the reasons enumerated above, 
namety, that the retaining wall of the old road was in 
very bad condition and liable to fall down at any time. 

The heirs of Mr. John H. Pierce generously offered to 
give such land as was necessary. 

It appeared to the Selectmen that there might never 
again be as many favorable conditions present for widen- 
ing at a low cost this portion of the highway; therefore, 
at a town meeting held September 6th, they presented 
the matter with plans to the town and the following 
vote was passed: — 

" Voted that the Selectmen be authorized and directed 
to widen and construct the road substantially accord- 
ing to the plan filed with the Town Clerk." 

The Selectmen accordingly advertised for bids from 
contractors. The work was awarded to Mr. R. D. 
Donaldson, to be completed for a sum not exceeding 
$2,000.00,. he being the lowest bidder. The work was 
nearly completed before winter set in and will be finished 
early in the spring. 



STREET LIGHTING. 

The Selectmen entered into a contract, in accordance 
with the votes of the Town at the last annual meeting, 
for the electric lighting of the streets, which had been 
previously lighted with kerosene lamps, the number of 
lights not to exceed eighty. The contract was made 
with the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston and eighty-one lights have been installed, light- 
ing much more highway than had previously been lighted. 

The location of the lights seems on the whole to be 
satisfactory and the streets are now lighted from the 



47 

lane near the house of Mr. Charles Wheeler to Mr. 
Farnsworth's Corner, from Farnsworth's Corner to the 
Haynes Crossing on the Fitchburg. Railroad, and from 
the center of the town on all the roads centering there, 
for a distance of about half a mile. The total expense to 
the town per year will be approximately $1,061.10, or 
$13.10 per light. 

OLD SCHOOLHOUSE. 

The town referred this matter to the Selectmen to 
investigate at . the last town meeting, it having been 
stated that inasmuch as the old schoolhouse was not 
now used for school purposes that it reverted with the 
land to the adjoining owners. The Selectmen have 
investigated this matter thoroughly and find the records 
respecting the same as follows: — 

In March, 1763, the following appears on the records: 

The builders of the school house that stands in the 
middle of the town by the meeting house did at this 
town meeting present said school house as a gift to the 
town, to be improved for the purposes and conveniences 
of a school, and twenty-five rods of land adjoining said 
house, so long as the town shall see fit to use it for said 
purposes. 

Voted and accepted, March, 1763. 

Nothing further appears on the records respecting the 
school house or schoolhouse site as affecting ownership 
until May, 1870, when the following vote was passed: — 

May 30, 1870. 

VOTED, — That if the committee or town shall decide 
to locate the new house on the site of the old school 
house, the Building Committee have full power to remove 
the old school house and hearse house and provide some 
other place for the hearse. 



48 

In the First Parish records of 1870 there is a record 
which, in our opinion, is especially valuable, as follows: — 

"The Building Committee appointed by the Town to 
carry into effect its vote to erect a schoolhouse respect- 
fully submit to the First Parish that in pursuance of their 
duties under instructions of the Town they located said 
Schoolhouse on land occupied by the old Primary School- 
house and adjacent thereto, without intention of tres- 
passing on the rights of any parties. 

Respectfully submitted for the Committee, 

SAMUEL HARTWELL, Clerk pro tern. 

It was then voted that the Parish cheerfully acquiesce 
in the Town building a schoolhouse in part on parish 
land and in occupying the same so long as it may be im- 
proved for school purposes. 

Voted to dissolve the Meeting. 

ALONZO S.'FISKE, Parish Clerk" 

In connection with these records it is proper to state for 
the information of the town that it does not appear, 
either in connection with the record or otherwise, who 
the builders and donors of the schoolhouse of 1763 were. 
It may be presumed that this was conveyed by deed to 
the town. So far as we have discovered, there is no 
record of the deed. The town has occupied the land 
now occupied by the present school house building ever 
since 1763, both for school and other purposes, including 
storage for a hearse and in later years storage for hose and 
hose carriage, and apparatus of the Fire Department. 
There seems, therefore, no question about the town's 
right to continue to occupy the land originally given to 
the town and the building erected on it for school and 



49 

such other purposes as they may desire. The building 
now standing on this lot is a well constructed building 
and can be repaired and such changes made as seem to 
be necessary for a comparatively small sum of money. 
The question which presents itself directly to the town 
is whether repairs shall be made on this building which are 
necessary and such changes made as are desirable for use 
by the town or if the building shall be torn down and 
such other use made of the land as the town shall see fit. 
We trust the town will pass some definite votes respect- 
ing the matter at the March meeting. 



TELEPHONE RATES. 

At a town meeting held Sept. 6, last the following 
resolution was passed: — 

"Resolved, that the Town of Lincoln, in town meeting 
assembled, unanimously hereby protests against the 
telephone rates suggested by the Highway Commission 
and about to be adopted by the New England Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, and requests the Selectmen to 
adopt all proper measures to procure amendment of 
the same." 

The Selectmen carried out the provisions of the above 
resolution by writing a letter in the following form to 
the New England Telephone & Telegraph Company, the 
Massachusetts Highway Commission, and Governor 
Draper, and by appearing in behalf of the town at meet- 
ings which were called to more emphatically register the 
protests above referred to. 



50 

September 12, 1910. 

Massachusetts Highway Commissioners, 

State House, 

Boston, Mass. 
Gentlemen: — 

I enclose herewith copy of resolution passed at a meet- 
ing of the citizens of the town of Lincoln, duly called, 
on September 6th, 1910. 

The Selectmen respectfully enter a protest against the 
establishment of the proposed rates. 

Yours very truly, 

For the Selectmen. 



Acknowledgments were received from them all. 
Present indications are that our protest, with others, 
has had the result which was sought. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. LEE TODD, 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



51 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS. 



Feb. 1, 1910 to Feb. 1, 1911. 



To Board of Selectmen: — 
I hereby submit the following report:- 



Number of herds of cows 


83 


Number of cows 


. 763 


Number of heifers 


32 


Number of bulls 


11 


Number of pigs 


642 


Number of sheep 


, 6 


Cows quarantined and taken for tuberculosis 


7 



MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Inspector of Animals. 



52 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS. 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit the 
third annual report, ending January 31st, 1911. 

The department is practically the same as last year. 

Force. 

Thirty-eight men belong to the department: one chief, 
four assistant engineers, thirty-three call men. There 
are three organized companies. 

Apparatus. 

The apparatus belonging to the department is as 
follows: — 

Three hose carriages, eighteen fire extinguishers. 



Location of Apparatus. 

No. 1. Hose House, old school house Lincoln Center. 

No. 2. Kept at F. E. Cousins' grain store, South 
Lincoln. 

No. 3. Hose House, John Dee's Farm, Virginia Road, 
North Lincoln, 



53 
Fires. 

There have been the loss of one stable owned by Roger 
Sherman, also a number of forest and chimney fires. 

We recommend that the sum of six hundred dollars 
($600 ) be appropriated for the use of the department to 
be expended under the direction of the Board of Engineers. 

We would also recommend that a place be provided for 
the Center Hose Carriage. 

ISAAC N. MacRAE, Chief, 
WM. C. ROBUS, 
THOMAS DEE, 
WM. SHERMAN, 
HERBERT FARRAR, 

Board of Engineers. 



54 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

To the Selectmen of Lincoln: — 

Gentlemen: — The roads have been in my charge the 
past year, and to the time when the ground froze up were 
in very good condition all over Town. 

The open winter, with its frequent freezing and thaw- 
ing, has been very disastrous in a way and yet it has 
afforded an excellent opportunity for those who wished 
to draw in stone to the crushers. The people in the north 
part of the Town took advantage of the chance and what 
they hauled in, together with what the Town teams have 
been able to draw, has been crushed, and so far as pos- 
sible hauled to different parts of the Town where it is 
ready for spring use. I estimate about twelve hundred 
tons now ready for this year's use, which I consider a 
valuable asset. 

A large quantity of gravel has been used in resurfacing 
the road where the cobble-stones were beginning to 
show; this is liable to be thrown into the gutters by 
automobiles before another season is past, unless some 
sort of a binder is put on to prevent it. There was a 
great call by members of your board and others for a 
dust suppressor, and one hundred and forty barrels 
of road oil were purchased and distributed where the 
most people would get the benefit of it. Several of our 
citizens requested an application of oil for a short strip 
near their houses; they were accommodated as far as 
possible and practicable, and in many cases the applicant 
paid the expense. The time has come when oil or some 



55 

other road preservative has got to be used, and I think five 
hundred barrels could be used to advantage this year. 

The usual amount of guard rail has been built and still 
there is a chance for a lot more. The widening of the 
road in the center of the Town (by contract ) is a per- 
manent improvement, as is also the widening in the 
hollow near Mr. DeNormandie's new buildings. If the 
widening opposite the Pierce property was continued to 
the corner near the house of the Misses Chapin it would 
be a still further permanent improvement. The tree 
warden has had the use of the two double carts, which 
were all right for his work, but too much out of repair for 
highway work. These carts should be sold to the tree- 
warden department. One new double cart, one road 
machine and one street sprinkler have been purchased 
this year. 

The horses have worked well and practically all the 
time. I think it would be advisable to dispose of one 
horse and purchase two new ones this coming season. 
Guide boards have been repaired and replaced and are 
in their proper places. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN F. FARRAR, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



57 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



I have examined the accounts of the Town Treasurer, 
the Treasurer of the Sinking and Trust Funds, and 
Cemetery Commissioners and find their accounts to be 
correct. 

I have seen vouchers for all money paid and all se- 
curities of the Town held by them. 

Following is an account of the money paid by the 
Town Treasurer on the Selectmen's orders. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



58 



SCHOOLS. 



Payments. 



C. S. Lyman, Services as Supt. of Schools, $500 00 

C. S. Lyman, Cash Expenses, 7 61 

Walter F. Brackett, Director of Manual Arts, 525 00 

C. B. Chapin, Teaching, 625 00 

H. B. Heath, Teaching, 550 00 

H. F. Marshall, Teaching, 275 00 

Annie C. Buck, Teaching, 525 00 

Martha Tower, Teaching, 150 00 

Grace E. Robinson, Teaching, 100 00 

Stella V. Sanborn, Teaching, 450 00 

Lillian H. Shaw, Teaching, 250 00 

H. J. Bartlett, Teaching, 60 00 

A. P. Smith, Teaching, 150 00 

John F. Farrar, Carrying Children, 276 00 

James B. Wheeler, Carrying Children, 456 00 
James B. Wheeler, Carrying Pupils to Lexington, 17 55 

James B. Wheeler, Cash Paid, 2 20 

Thomas J. Dee, Carrying Children, 456 00 

Thomas J. Dee, Cash Paid, 45 

G. L. Cousins, Carrying Children, 216 00 

J. F. Baker, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 17 55 

L. E. Brooks, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 17 45 
Charles Wetherbee, Carrying pupil to Concord, 17 55 

T. G. Cahill, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 8 20 
Charles S. Plummer, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 5 85 

Charles D. Sargent, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 17 45 

Town of Concord, Tuition, 960 00 

Town of Concord, Lost Book, 1 05 



59 

Town of Lexington, Tuition, 
Boston & Maine R.R., Car Fares, 
Edward Bannon, Janitor at School, 
A. G. Davis, Janitor, South School, 

E. R. Davis, Janitor, South School, 
Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 
National Express Co., Express, 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service, 

H. A. Wood, Professional Services, 

Thomas J. McGann, Repairs, 

John A. Burgess, Repairs, 

John MacComber, Repairs, 

S. R. Snelling, Coal, 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Coal, 
Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 
Wayland Grain Co., Wood, 

D. E. Sherman, 1 Cord Wood, 
Howard Clock Co., Repairing Clock, 
W. C. Robus, Repairing Clock, 
Mrs. C. F. Foreman, Taking Census, 
The News, Printing, 

Ed. Press Co., Printing, 

E. W. Pope, Milk, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, 

I. N. McRae, Labor and Supplies, 

R. D. Donaldson Labor and Supplies, 

Bridgeport Wood Finishing Co., Supplies, 

Milton Bradley Co., Supplies, 

Palmer & Parker Co., Supplies, 

Chandler & Barbar Co., Supplies, 

Wakefield Rattan Co., Supplies, 

E. E. Babb Co., Supplies, 

Hood Rubber Co., Supplies, 

H. D. Duster Co., Supplies, 

Joseph Breck & Sons, Supplies, 

Linen Thread Co., Supplies, 



$65 00 


296 80 


500 


00 


62 35 


66 


50 


1 


00 


3 


89 


23 


15 


200 


00 


14 45 


37 


10 


2 


85 


320 


93 


4 


25 


132 60 


4 


00 


8 


00 


6 


25 


1 


00 


10 


00 


10 


75 


8 


00 


6 24 


151 


46 


71 


99 


108 


04 


1 


89 


3 


88 


6 


31 


7 34 


11 


05 


114 


54 


11 


76 


2 


92 


8 


25 


3 


88 



60 

C. G. Fairbanks, Supplies, 

Silver, Burdett Co., Supplies, 

J. L. Hammett Co., Supplies, 

Ginn & Co., Supplies, 

J. W. McLean & Co., Supplies, 

Butterick Lumber Co., Supplies, 

A. R. McLeod, Supplies, 

Jordan Marsh Co., Supplies, 

Hudson Department Store, Supplies, 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 

Frost & A. Co., Supplies, 

Holden P. & B. Cover Co., Supplies, 

C. E. Doner, Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 



Total, $8,644 07 



HIGHWAYS. 



Payments. 



$4 22 


34 21 


3 53 


23 94 


1 84 


57 06 


2 50 


18 50 


3 50 


51 40 


4 94 


6 00 


4 80 


2 30 



John A. Burgess, Shoeing and Jobbing, $136 03 

John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 140 37 

James Diamond, Labor, 12 00 

William H. Ryan, Labor, 366 21 

John W. Rooney, Labor, 446 22 

Martin J. Rooney, Labor, 426 07 

Dennis Doherty, Labor, 337 73 

Patrick Craven, Labor, 286 45 

Frank Martin, Labor, 24 00 

John Johnson, Labor, 716 50 

Frank Cunningham, Labor, 147 00 



61 

Charles Rooney, Labor, $4 00 

Cunningham Bros., Labor, 90 00 

Andrew J. Doherty, Labor, 13 50 

John F. Farrar, Superintendent of Labor, 400 42 
Daniel H. Sherman, Superintendent of Labor, 331 08 

Daniel E. Sherman, Labor, 25 00 

Daniel E. Sherman, Hay, 77 72 

H. Berger, 1930 lbs. Hay, 19 30 

E. R. Farrar, 2,050 lbs. Hay @$22.00, 22 55 
Samuel Farrar, 2,160 lbs. Hay @$18.00, 19 44 
Geo. E. Sherman, 1J ton Straw, 20 00 
John F. Farrar & Son, 1,500 lbs. Straw, 15 00 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Grain and Coal, 404 25 
J. W. Raymond, Grain, 64 9a 
Marcy & Co., Coal, 38 43 
D. E. Sherman, 9,400 lbs. Hay @$1.25, 117 50 
New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, 21 17 
Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 18 92 
National Express Co., Express, 1 04 
Edwin S. Bent, Rent of Barn, 96 00 
Wallace M. Brooks, Rent of Land, 25 00 
John M. MacComber, Repairing, 27 95 
Peter Perry, Repairing Harness, 15 15 
Daniel MacAskill, Repairing and Shoeing, 17 95 
Samuel Watson, Labor and Supplies, 33 08 
Standard Oil Co., Road Oil, 512 94 
Lincoln Water Works, Repairing Crusher, 3 50 
Geo. A. Luck, Inspecting Boiler Crusher, 5 00 
Ames Plow Co., 1 Cart, 140 00 
C. E. Wheeler, 5,750 lbs. Hay, 72 48 
H. L. Alderman, Professional Services, 18 00 
Studebaker Bros. Co., 1-600 gallon Sprinkler, 395 00 
J. B. Wheeler, 1 Sign Board, 1 50 
R. D. Donaldson, Labor at Stable, 12 12 
Good Road Machine Co., Supplies, 398 89 
Ames Implement & Supply Co., Supplies, 34 87 



62 

But trick Lumber Co., Supplies, 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 

Garloek Packing Co., Supplies, 

Boston St. Pipe Supply & Repair Co., Supplies, 

Thomas E. Coburn, Oil Wagon, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, 

R. E. Butcher, Stone, 

Daniel Holman, Stone, 

Michael Connors, Stone, 

John D. Fleming, Stone, 

Eugene Jose, Stone, 

Max Tankle, Stone, 

John Morrissey, Stone, 

Horace Paine, Stone, 

Mary Butcher, Stone, 

George E. Sherman, Sand, 

Charles D. Sargent, Gravel, 

Flint Bros., Gravel, 

Neal Jenson, Gravel, 

Edwin S. Bent, Gravel, 

Charles S. Smith, Gravel, 

Mary Doyle, Estate, Gravel, 

George Harrington, Gravel, 

E. Brown, Gravel, 



Total, $7,041 56 



9 


74 


2 


90 




55 


ii 4 


15 


58 


81 


29 


90 


22 


91 


24 00 


26 


17 


25 


25 


9 


80 


48 55 


73 


98 


2 


13 


26 


10 


3 


00 




90 


4 


85 


23 62 


5 


85 


10 20 


52 


80 


2 40 


20 


55 



63 
TREE WARDEN. 



Payments. 



Edward R. Farrar, Services as Tree Warden, 

Edward R. Farrar, Use of Horse, 

Edward R. Farrar, Cash paid for Freight, 

Henry A. Butcher, Labor, 

Henry A. Butcher, Use of Horse, 

Burt Pearson^ Labor, 

Burt Pearson, Use of Horse, 

John Cannair, Labor, 

Charles R. Butcher, Labor, 

Byron Lunt, Labor, 

John D. Flemming, Labor, 

Dennis Doherty, Labor, 

William H. Ryan, Labor, 

Fred Bamforth, Labor, 

J. W. Rooney, Labor, 

M. J. Rooney, Labor, 

John Johnson, Labor, 

N. Fleming, Labor, 

Frost Insecticide Co., Repairing Sprayer, 

John A. Burgess, Repairing, 

John M. MacComber, Repairing, 

Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 

National Express Co., Express, 

Frost Insecticide Co., Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies 

D. E. Sherman, Teaming, 

Highway Department, Teaming, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, 

Charles F. Foreman, Filing Saws, 

Total, $4,010 37 



$426 50 


113 


50 


1 


00 


466 


94 


70 


50 


239 


75 


181 


00 


557 42 


580 


26 


79 


50 


238 


76 


40 00 


42 00 


265 


51 


34 00 


36 


00 


42 


00 


139 


50 


68 


30 


27 


75 


16 


75 


20 


16 


1 


45 


22 


35 


2 23 




58 


55 


00 


65 


50 


159 


16 


17 


00 



64 
STATE AID. 



Payments. 



John Tasker, 12 payments @ $4.00, $48 00 



WIDENING STATION ROAD. 



Payments. 
Robert D. Donaldson, 1st payment, $1,000 00 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 



Payments. 



City of Waltham, Care of Matthew Ellsworth 

and Wife, $64 53 

Commonwealth of Mass., Care of Caroline Preble, 94 01 
Commonwealth of Mass., Care of Ethel Preble, 

lWeek, 2 75 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Care of Insane Man, 2 00 

Town of Concord, Miss Clements, Service in 

Preble Case, 23 39 

Total, $186 68 



65 
CEMETERY. 



Payments. 



Herbert E. Barnes, Labor, 

Roger Sherman, Labor, 

John W. Sims & Co., Labor, 

James T. Laird, Faucet, 

Water Commissioners, Water Service, 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 

Total, $269 18 



$62 39 


180 64 


12 00 


1 00 


10 00 


3 15 



INTEREST. 



Payments. 



Bond & Goodwin, Interest, Note, No. 1 due 

April 1, $254 67 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Payments. 



Martin M. Welch, Fumigating, $6 00 

Martin M. Welch, Cleaning out Troughs, 
Samuel Howes, Burying Cow and Horse, 
Highway Dept., Cleaning Out Barn Cellar 

after Fire, 
Carter, Carter & Meigs Co., Supplies, 
F. H. Thomas Co., Supplies, 

Total, $61 89 



4 00 


1 00 


3 50 


6 95 


40 44 



66 
PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Payments. 



John F. Farrar, Dog Tax Returned, $377 86 

John F. Farrar, Town Appropriation, 400 00 



$777 86 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL. 
Treas. Waltham Hospital, Town Appropriation, $250 00 



BORROWED MONEY. 
First National Bank, Note, due Dec. 1, $10,000 00 



EQUIPMENT OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

James T. Laird, 2 Fire Extinguishers, 
Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 
E. & F. King Co., Supplies, 
Badger Fire Ex. Co., Supplies, 

Total, $44 43 



$20 00 


33 


10 62 


13 48 



67 
HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE. 



Payments. 



Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, Hall, $50 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Hydrants, 1,665 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Service, Water Troughs, 462 97 



Total, $2,177 97 



BONDS AND INTEREST ON ACCOUNT. 
New School House. 



Payments. 



First National Bank, Coupons, July 1st, 1910, $980 00 
First National Bank, Coupons, Jan., 1911, 980 00 

First National Bank, Bonds, Jan., 1911, 3,000 00 



Total, $4,960 00 



STREET LIGHTS. 



Payments. 



Edwin Bannon, Care of Lamps, $145 85 

Jenny Mfg. Co., Supplies, 59 02 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., Light Service, 356 83 

Total, $561 70 



68 
MISCELLANEOUS. 



Payments. 



New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service, 

Edwin Bannon, Services as Janitor, 

Edwin Bannon, Extra Labor, 

John J. Kelliher, Services as Constable, 

Winslow Eaton, Services as Constable, 

George E. Cunnington, Services as Constable, 

Jas. T. Laird, Services as Constable, 

Jas. T. Laird, Court Fees, 

Charles Rooney, Services as Constable, 

P. B. Murphy, Printing, 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 

George E. Crosby & Co., Printing, 

National Express Co., Express, 

Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 

C. S. Wheeler, Postage, etc., 

C. S. Wheeler, Insurance, Town Hall, 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement ol Taxes, 

C. S. Wheeler, Collector of Taxes, 1909, 

C. S. Wheeler, Town Treasurer, 

C. S. Wheeler, Services as Assessor, 

William H. Sherman, Services as Assessor, 

William C. Pierce, Services as Assessor, 

George E. Crosby & Co., Printing Town Reports, 

W. Ferguson, Postage, 

Tuttle's Stable, Barge, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Returning Births, 

John Cunnair, Care of Insane Man, 

C. H. Rooney, Care of Insane Man, 

M. J. Rooney, Care of Insane Man, 

N. Jenson, Care of Insane Man, 

Samuel Farrar, Perambulating Town Lines, 

J. M. Eveleth, Perambulating Town Lines, 

John F. Farrar, Perambulating Town Lines, 12 00 



$42 22 


216 


63 


3 


00 


3 00 


15 


00 


45 


00 


46 


00 


10 


19 


10 


00 


3 


95 


2 


50 


6 00 


1 


36 




68 


20 


62 


81 


04 


3,589 


05 


534 


19 


300 


00 


50 00 


50 00 


85 


00 


, 272 


70 


2 


55 


7 00 


3 


75 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



69 

Roger Sherman, Rent of Land for Scales, 
First National Bank, Registering Notes, 
H. J. Stevens, Stock List, 1910, 
Geo. W. Cutting, Surveying, 
Whitman & Howard, Surveying, 
I. N. MacRae, Heating Town Hall, 
I. N. MacRae, Plumbing Town Hall, 
Harry J. Cooper, Wiring Town Hall, 
Harry J. Cooper, Extra Wiring Town Hall, 
Commonwealth of Mass. Voting Lists, 
Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle, 
Herman T. Wheeler, Services at Election, 
Thomas L. Giles, Services at Election, 
James W. Lennon, Services at Election, 
Allen, Doane & Co., 5 Signs — Exit, 
Hanley & Goulding, Painting Town Hall, 
Hanley & Goulding, Extra Painting Town Hall, 
Pettingell, Andrews Co., Electric Fixtures, 

Town Hall, 
A. J. Dougherty, Assisting Constable, 
Charles Woodhull, Care of Piano, 
Highway Department, Teaming Coal, 
Charles S. Smith, Services as Selectman, 
Charles S. Smith, Services as Overseer, 
Charles S. Smith, Services as Registrar, 
Charles S. Smith, Postage, etc., 
R. D. Donaldson, Services as Selectman, 
R. D. Donaldson, Services as Overseer, 
R. D. Donaldson, Services as Registrar, 
C. L. Todd, Services as Selectman, 
C. L. Todd, Services as Overseer, 
C. L. Todd, Services as Registrar, 
Geo. L. Chapin, Insurance on School House, 
Geo. L. Chapin, Services as Town Clerk, 
Geo. L. Chapin, Services as Registrar, 
G. E. Sherman, Snow Work, 
J. J. Kelliher, Snow Work, 



25 00 


25 00 


19 05 


21 95 


26 20 


736 00 


125 00 


316 35 


162 32 


1 25 


26 79 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


6 25 


375 00 


11 15 


166 50 


6 00 


7 00 


44 50 


150 00 


25 00 


10 00 


7 61 


150 00 


25 00 


10 00 


150 00 


25 00 


10 00 


28 68 


100 00 


15 00 


1 50 


6 00 



70 

Cunningham Bros., Snow Work, 56 75 

W. H. Flynn, Snow Work, 10 50 

Martin Sherman, Snow Work, 9 00 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Town Hall, 648 76 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Town Scales, 7 10 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Hose House, 4 09 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Flag Pole, 17 50 

Hobbs & Warren Co., Supplies, 7 85 

Thomas Groom & Co., Supplies, 8 25 

Joseph Breck & Sons, Supplies, 4 50 

Carter Ink Co., Supplies, 1 25 

Edison Electric Light Co., Supplies, 64 85 

The Fairbanks Co., Supplies, 1 25 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 25 67 

I. N. McRae, Labor at Town Hall, 5 05 

I. N. McRae, Fighting Fires, 18 80 

Charles S. Wheeler, Fighting Fires, 4 00 

F. E. Cousins, Fighting Fires, 16 40 

Charles Cunnert, Fighting Fires, 4 10 

Fritz Cunnert, Fighting Fires, 80 

William Robus, Fighting Fires, 2 00 

P. J. Lennon, Fighting Fires, 1 60 

Samuel Howes, Fighting Fires, 1 60 

T. Brown, Fighting Fires, 1 20 

E. T. Wetherbee, Fighting Fires, 1 20 

Herman T. Wheeler, Fighting Fires, 5 00 

Henry Pangborn, Fighting Fires, 80 

M. E. Ehlert, Fighting Fires, 80 

E. B. Rice, Fighting Fires, 1 60 

Herbert G. Farrar, Fighting Fires, 2 40 

Charles S. Smith, 2 Cords Wood, 12 00 

S. R. Snelling, Coal— Town Hall, 137 20 

Thomas J. Dee, Care of Hose House, 15 00 

James W. Lennon, Services as Auditor, 125 00 

Services of 37 Hosemen @$2.00, 74 00 

Total, $9,559 40 



71 



RECAPITULATION. 



Schools, 


$9,144 07 


Highways, 


7,041 56 


Tree Warden, 


4,010 37 


Support of Poor, 


186 68 


Public Library, 


777 86 


Cemetery, , 


269 18 


Board of Health, 


61 89 


Street Lamps, 


561 70 


Water, 


12,167 73 


Miscellaneous, 


9,559 40 


State Aid, 


48 00 


Equipment of Fire Department, 


44 43 


Interest, 


254 67 


Borrowed Money, 


10,000 00 


Bonds and Interest, Payment % New School, 


4,960 00 


Widening Station Road, 


1,000 00 


Hydrants and Other Public Water Service, 


2,177 97 


Waltham Hospital, 


250 00 


Total, 


$63,515 51 



72 



O00Tt<t^O 



••S3 



a.*5*s-s 

J5 o © * 

mmOccK 



o 
3 

CO 

8 

ft 



* 



•& 



COO <N 
OCO lO 



onoonoootjiu;^ 

t- i-H(NO<N<N 

OCO 



.-? 2 ■ 2 •'■3 

S o o a 
gft g, £ 

• .go -5 

. -**'*•*•*& 

£ o.|g -g •§ - s o b >, • • ; o0 

^ ^£m k ©^i©^o2i2"5-£P< ^ _. O m £ £ $ 

©_ : = = :: J= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = gS 

a 

■as 

pq.£: : : :::::::::: 3 s 2 = : : : = 3 3 : 



73 



Report of the Commissioners of Sinking and 
Trust Funds. 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS. 

In Account loith 



1910. 
Feb. 



Dec. 19. 
1911. 
Feb. 1. 



1910. 
Dec. 



21. 



TOWN OF LINCOLN. 

Dr. 

Balance 

Coupons, Pennsylvania R. R. Co. 3^s 
Coupons, Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry. 4s 
Coupons, Boston & Albany R. R. 4s 
Coupons, Am. Tel. & Tel. Coll. Tr. 4s 
Coupons, Illinois Steel 5s . 
Interest, M. A. Buffum, mtge. . 
Interest on deposit .... 
Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treas. 



Balance 



Cr. 

$1,000 New Eng. Tel. & Tel. 5s, 1915 
$1,000 Lake Shore & Mich. So. 4s, 1931 
$1,000 West End St. Ry. 4^s, 1914 



$154 48 

35 00 

40 00 

80 00 

80 00 

150 00 

75 00 

6 89 

2,173 37 

187 29 

$2,982 03 



$1,021 11 

940 17 

1,020 75 

$2,982 03 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Convertible 33^s, due 1915. 

$2,000 Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry. Co. Debenture 4s, due 1931. 

$2,000 Boston & Albany R. R. Co., 4s, due 1933. 

$2,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. Collateral Trust 4s, due 1929. 

$3,000 Illinois Steel Co. Debenture 5s, due 1913. 

$1,000 West End Street Railway Co. 43^s, due 1914. 

$1,000 New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s, due 1915. 

$1,500 Mortgage Note, Mary A. Buffum. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C, L. TODD, Treasurer. 



74 

TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 



1910. 
Feb. 



Dr. 



1. Balance 

Dividends, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. 
Dividends, West End St. Ry. pfd. . 
Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 
Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Coupons, Illinois Steel Co. 5s 
Interest on deposit . . 



$60 76 
64 00 
52 00 
64 00 
32 00 
25 00 
7 43 

$305 19 



1911 Cr. 

Jan. 1. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account 



$244 43 
60 76 

$305 19 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co., preferred. 
8 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
$500 Illinois Steel Co. 5s, due 1913. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Ireasurer. 



75 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 

1910. Dr. 
Feb. 1. Balance 



Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad preferred 
Dividends, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. 
Interest on deposit .... 



$33 02 

35 00 

16 00 

1 62 


$85 64 


$52 62 
33 02 


$85 64 



1911. Cr. 

Jan. 1. Cash paid J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library- 
Balance on deposit, principal account 



The Fund is invested aa follows: 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co., preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C L. TODD, Treasurer. 



76 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT 
OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1910. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 4s. . 
Interest on deposit 



$190 00 
40 00 

5 38 


$235 38 


45 38 

182 75 

7 25 


$235 38 



1911. Cr. 

Jan. 1. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library 

2 shares West End Street Railway Co., common 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s, due 1929. 
2 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

L Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



77 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN LIBRARY. 



1910. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Coupons, Pennsylvania R. R. 33^s 

" Amer. Tel. & Tel. 4s 

Interest . .... 



$476 28 
35 00 
40 00 

14 72 


$566 00 


89 72 

. 456 88 

19 40 


$566 00 



1911. Cr. 

Jan. 24. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 

25. 5 shares West End St. Ry. common 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Convertible 33^s, 1915. 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929 

5 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



78 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT POOR. 

1910. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $179 89 

Coupons, Pennsylvania R.R. 33^s .... 35 00 

" American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s ... 4000 

Interest 5 31 

$260 20 

1910. Cr. 

Mar. 7. Cash paid out $157 01 

1911. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, income account ... 58 19 

Balance on deposit, principal account ... 45 00 

$260 20 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Convertible 3>£s, due 1915. 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD. Treasurer. 



79 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN HEARSE 

1910. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $121 67 

Dividend, Pennsylvania R. R 24 00 

Interest ". . 4 01 

$149 68 



1910. Cr. 

Dec. 12. 1 Share Pennsylvania R. R. Co $64 44 

1911. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit 85 24 

$149 68 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

9 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 



Respectfully submitted 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



80 



C. L. TODD, TREASURER 

In Account with 

THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND. 

1910. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Dividends, Pennsylvania Railroad 

Boston & Providence R.R. 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. '. 
Fitchburg R.R. pfd. . 
Old Colony R. R. 
Boston & Albany 
Boston & Maine R.R. 
11 American Tel. & Tel. Co. . 

" Boston & Lowell R.R. 

West End St. Ry. pfd. . . 
" Nor. Idaho & Mont. Power pfd. 
Cash, Central Cross-Town, in liquidation . 
Coupons, Maine Central R.R., 4J^s . 
" Pennsylvania R.R. Co. 5s . 
Cash, $5,000 " " " " (matured) 
" $5,000 Cin., Hamilton & Dayton, 4^s, sold 
" 5 rights, Boston & Maine R.R. 
Interest on deposit 



1910. 




Feb. 


9. 




4. 




16. 




23. 


March 


2. 




11. 




23. 


April 


1. 


May 


10. 


June 


1. 


July 


1. 




4. 


Oct. 


17. 


Nov. 


2. 




7. 




16. 




30. 



Cr 

Miss Cooke and the Misses Turner 

James Galbraith, printing, etc. . 

T. A. Jaggar, Jr., lecture 

Melville C. Freeman, lecture 

Donald B. MacMillan, lecture . 

M. H. Doherty, carriages 

Paul M. Pearson, lecture 

$6,000 Maine Central R.R. 43^s, 1912 . 

S. C. Rogers, lantern services 

E. L. Rogers, lecture .... 

50 shares Nor. Idaho & Mont. Power, pfd. 

M. H. Doherty, carriages 

Boston Letter Carriers' Band 

The Oratorio Artists .... 

James Galbraith, printing 

George Kiernan, recital 

Barlaben String Quartette 

James Galbraith, printing, etc. 



$972 90 


78 00 


100 00 


40 00 


50 00 


70 00 


87 50 


30 00 


480 00 


240 00 


40 00 


125 00 


787 50 


135 00 


125 00 


5,000 00 


3,400 00 


14 50 


26 37 


$11,801 77 


$66 50 


13 40 


50 00 


15 64 


100 00 


6 00 


75 00 


5,977 50 


30 00 


75 00 


3,300 00 


4 00 


137 00 


150 00 


11 50 


50 00 


129 34 


13 95 



81 



Dec. 


1. 


Frederic Poole, lecture 


$100 00 




30. 


Charles Fleischer, lecture 


50 74 


1911. 








Jan. 


7. 


William Ferguson, postals, etc. 


7 35 




11. 


5 shares Boston & Maine R. R. . 


578 50 






Anchor Linotype Co., printing 


6 00 




12. 


Adamowski Trio, concert 


. . 177 22 




27. 


M. H. Doherty, carriages 


6 00 






John Kendrick Bangs, lecture 


100 00 


Feb. 


1. 


Balance on deposit 


571 13 




$11,801 77 



The Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows: 



26 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
30 " Boston & Lowell R.R. Co. 
10 " Boston & Providence R.R. Co. 
10 " Boston & Albany R.R, Co. 
10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co., pfd. 
10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 
10 " West End St. Ry. Co. pfd. 
5 " New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. Co. 
10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co., common. 
60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co., pfd. 
$5,000 Central Cross-Town R.R. Co., 5s, in liquidation. 
$6,000 Maine Central Railroad Co., 43^s, due 1912. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



82 



Report of the Treasurer of the Lincoln Cemetery 
Commissioners 



$173 


01 


10 


00 


12 


00 


28 


00 



February 1, 1910, Balance on hand, . ... 

Four dividends of $2.50 each on 2 shares Fitchburg Railroad 

preferred, 

Two dividends of $6.00 each on 3 shares Union Pacific 

preferred, ..... ... 

Four dividends of $7.00 each on 4 shares American Sugar 

Refining preferred, 

Balance in Treasurer's hands, February 1st, 1911 . . $223 01 

Securities on hand : 
Two shares Fitchburg Railroad preferred. 
Three shares Union Pacific preferred. 
Four shares American Sugar Refining preferred. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

Treasurer 



83 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 
For the Year ending Jan. 31, 191 1. 

No epidemic of contagious diseases has occurred in 
the Town during the past year. 

The following cases have been reported: — 

Measles 2, scarlet fever 3, mumps 4, whooping cough 5, 
chicken pox 5, tuberculosis 2. 

One complaint was received by the Board on account 
of a nuisance existing in North Lincoln. The nuisance 
has been removed and the offender has left Town. 

Appointments. 
Inspector of Meats, Martin M. Welch. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. W. HERMAN. 



84 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 

The Board of Assessors submit the following report : 



Number of residents assessed on 


property, 217 




' non- residents assessed on 


property 78 




1 assessed on polls only, 


197 




' acres of land assessed, 


8,740 




1 dwelling houses assessed, 


237J 




' horses assessed, 


360 




1 cows assessed, 


659 




* neat cattle other than cows assessed, 93 




' swine assessed, 


614 




* sheep assessed, 


4 


Value of land, exclusive of building 


s, $539,372.00 


" buildings, exclusive of land, 


785,145.00 


" real estate, 


$1,324,517.00 


" personal estate, 


2,149,417.00 


Total vaulation, 


$3,473,934.00 


State tax, 


$4,620.00 


County tax, 


3,204.00 


State highway tax, 


103.50 


Town grants, 


31,846.07 


Total, 


$39,773.57 



85 

Number of polls, 335 

Deduct part of corporation tax, $4,523 . 83 

Rate $10.00 per $1,000. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER, 
WM. C. PEIRCE, 
WM. H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors. 



86 



■"3 S3 

O O Ph 
H 



LOOOOOO^C ©©©h0i-<©»OU0©©©©© 
t^(M<M»0»OOl^OOOi— ICOOi— l»OOOOCO»-0 

H(MH(M^(McDO(NC<)(M00NM^OH(N00h 
© <N H H iO COl^-COCO©Tti 

C^CQ iH "^ i—l CO 



00 



03 OJ 

H £ 

03 O w 

+=> _. 



© 

© 



HO 

T— I 

© 



© © © 



iH CM 



©©©©©©©©© 

©©HO©©©©©© 

COON(NNON(MiO 
HH(M <M CO CO CO 00 



© 
© 



© 



ft* 

^3 



© 
© 

i— T 
© 



©©© ©©©©©©©©© 

(NiOiO ©©HO©©©©©© 

t-T t-T ecp of co" eo* co* oo" 



© 

© 
© 



a 

§ 

3 



Q 

CO 

w 






HO © 

© oq 

00 <M 



© © HO 
© © t^ 



tH <N 



© 

ho 



oq 



IO 1— I 
TH © 

HO 00 



iO iCOOOOO 
HiOOOOCCO 



rH © © 
rH ^ 

CO 



cqoo'- 1 



o£ H <-> 

® £ 03 

p a £+» 



»0© ©©LQ © iO tH hO ho © © © © © 

1> <M © © I>- ho r-{ © hioooocoio 

©CM t^(M t^ HOOO hOOhc^OOh 

HO (M tJH CO 



sag 

o3 o3 r^ 



o 



H 



Oh 
j-T s-T 

CD CD 
03 03 



CD ^ 
o3 w 

' ^ 2 

CD fl 

o3 o3 

pq pq 



^H 



3^£ 

CD 

£ i 
a g 

o3 o3 

PQPQ 



o3 
O & 

§ a 

s-h o3 
o3 CD 
PQPQ 



^CO 



M 



. fl rn CD 

O H. rt 



CD 



H 



c3 



^iapn^ 



3 *H 

1-3 03 

„co 

'a c 

CD CD 

WPQ 



GO 



■+J -+J ^ 

.CD CD >> M -? 



03 bJO fcJO CD « 

.M O O § g 

pqpqpqpqpq 



^>; 

CD^ 
>> 03 

O *H 

MPQ 



87 



OOOOO^OOO^OOOOOOOLOOOOGOOOOOO 

OLOiOOOt^^OiOt^OOOO^OCOO^OCiOOiOO^ 

i0HNOC0i0O^(N05 
<N COOHCON "tf <N 

co~ 



MMiOOHWOcOWOCOOCOW 



o o o 
©. © o 

CO to © 

10 *o 



o 

o 



o o o o o o 

lQ o o o o o 

O CO o »-o o o 
,— i tjh Tti lo © oq 



o 
o 



CO 



o 
o 






o 
o 



CO 



o 

o 



LO- 
CO 



o o o 



"tfl 00 © 
CO <M 



ooo o oooooo 

OOO O iO o o o o o 

CO^OO t-h OMOiO °^° 

lO lO r*T t-T ^T r^T iS ©~ cq" 



ooo 
ooo 
10 ^ *o 

co~ 



CO 



<M 



o 

o 

co~ 



ooo 

co^c^r 



ooo 

iCiOO 

N>00 
<M CO 






CO 
CO 



o *o o o 

OiONO 



o 
o 



o 10 o o O 00 

IOW00005 



CO CO *o TfH o 
00 rH 



o 
o 



o 

o 



<M O CO O 

o i— i r^- 
co" 



ooo 

iO *0 o 
N^OO 



CO 



(N CO CO 



© »o © © o 

OiONO O 

CO CO lO ^ ©. 

00*" lH 



© to © © © oo o o 

»OWCiOOCO o o 

tH <M O CO O tH 

•» »\ •» 

O rH t» 

CM rH 

CO 



£ 



rd >> 

PQPP 






CO <D 

o .q 



§11 6 



bH «s«< 



n 

d co co co a 

f-l 'S_| '?_, ")L( Fh 

pqpqpq-pqm 



a 

o 
o 



o 
c8 J* tr 1 .5 






M ^ p- 

M M M 

ooo 
ooo 

t-i S-H SH 

PQWPQ 






bfl 



d a 1- * - 

II em 

£ £ 5 « ^ 

O O O &►, H 

pqpqpqpqpq 



<r> -H 

o o 
co r 

Kb 

>> . < 23 

?h <I d o^ 

111 J 

WpqpqPQ 



a 

art 



r co 
^-i *d ri 



o 



w 



H 



. -^ 

-d fM o 

^ ^2 of 
d ^ d 



>. CO 



Oi co 

mo 



88 



3 — 

oo pi 



ooooootoooooo»ooooo*oooo»o 
oooooot^oooooc^io^ooot^oooco 

OiCOOM003i0^iO(M00000050kOCC^^ON 

00 ^ CO ^ CN CO rH ^CO^NO <N TJH T^ i-H ^ OS 



- AW 
d 0_ 



o o o 
o o o 

(OiOO 



o o o 
to o o 

I> to to 

tP <M CO 



oooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooo 

rjHiOOOHO»OiOiOOiO(NOiO 
Tfi O CO CM O rH ^fi Tti i— I <f 1>- 

tO 



0) Z&3 



2aH 
tx-' 






o o o 

o o o 



o o o 

to o o 



oooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooo 

Tt-i to O^ O^ i— ^ O^ to tq^ to^ O^ tq^ CM O^tq^ 

TjT so co c<r o~ i— r r^*" tp i— r TfT i>r 

to 



H -5 

p o 

eh a 



o o 
o o 



co o 



o 

o 



o 

CO 



to o 

l> o 



Tf< tO 



0*0000 
O O <M to to O 


to 


O 

o 


to 

CO 


1-4 O 


CO 


<N 





£ 3 en S 



O O 
O O 
CO O 



O 

O 
O 



to o 

I>- o 

Th lO 



i-l CO 



o o to o o o 

O O <M to to o 
CNi 0^1> 00 rh to 



to o 
l> o 
CO <N 



to 

CO 



c 

tSj • 

d^ 

d.o d 

pi 



d 
o 
02 






d *d ^ 

6 S 3 

' d.S d" 
,'cl £« "S 

o3 03 c3 

^d ^ M 

ooo 



* 



so » 



0) 

o B 



■*3 

,-a-a.g 

c3 c3 h 

OOO 



£ d 

o^ 
44-53 

OO 



M 



"S ° 

§ § 

oo 



•a s 

d~ go 

§ 8 

d d 
T3 d 

o o 
OO 



o3 

d 
d 

O <D 



PQ 



CO 
M d _T 

o o 



d o 

O O v_/ w r ^ 

OOOOO 



d J-. 

.9 .S 

d d 
o o 
OO 



89 



OOOOOOOOOOOO 
t^OOOOiOiOOOO<M 



OOOOOOOOiOOOOOO 
OOOOiOOOOI>00*00»0 



^iCO^^N^OOOOJCOONONiOOON^OOiWH 
^iow C^TtnC^>O(MiOCDC0 1-1 ^ CO^H <M<M 

*0 CO H 



oooooooo 

00000*000 

iOOOi*M(NHO 
Ol * CO NWN 



OOOOOOOOOOOO 

oooooo^oooooo 



OiOOiONO 

oq «# oo cq h 
oq 



H CO COM WiO 

H CO T^ T— I 



o o 

<N O 

O T-l 



OOOOOOOO 

ooooo^ooo 

iq^O^O * CO O^tH o 

of'*" co ofco'of 



OOOOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOOOO 

qioo^b. °^ ,_H 5p oo oi oo its 
of^cxTof p-Ti-T co""*W 

OQ tH 



o o 

o o 

O *H 

of of 



iO o 


o o o 


o 


IC o o 


o o 


iO o o o 


o 


i>- o 


O O iO 


o 


(NOO 


oo 


b- o o *o 


»o 


o »o 


Ol O CO 


o 


* CO lO 


CO OJ 


i-H tH O CO 




i-4 i-l 


1— ) 




i-l 00 
CO 


CO 






iO o 


o o o 


o 


to o o 


o o 


LO o o o 


o 


I>- o 


o o >o 


o 


woo 


o o 


1> O O iO 


*0 


o iO 


CQ »0 CO 


o 


* CO lO 


CO Ol 


rH i—i Oi CO 


















rH t-H 


1— 1 




i-l 00 
CO 


CO 







K o ° C 

d d ~ " 
.d .d ^ o 

M tn o > 

g 5 § s 

O O t-. Ft 

oooo 



2 -u> O 

J o K 



" en 
©.ft 

few 

CD 



§■2 

d s 3 a c3 

d d d 5 d 



«2 

•§18 



CD .. 
PI .2 

9 > 

OOOOQQQ 



d d d r ^ » 



> d 

O •"» 

W CD 
CD CD 

QQ 



03 

W 

of. 

09 i 

&' 



.5 GO 

*— Ti-d i — i 

C3 rd 

^ .2 ° 



'-3 Jz; 






2 oT2 

5 73 PJ 

QQQQQQQ 



d 

d m 

CD C3 



<1 



CD 0) CD 



*H CO 

c3 d 

CD CD bJO oC o 
O O O j 3 c3 

QQQflW 



90 



H 


0J 


LOOOOtQi-OOOOOO^HOOOOOrHOOOO 

i— iooor^.r^oooooooLOOioo^oooo 


Total Cash 
on Persoc 

and 
Real Esta 




CDO^Oc0 l( 3W00»O 
O i— 1 (N WW t^ (M 
rH rH rH 


CO HH(N 


CO to "=t< © 

OH lO 
HO0O5 


i-< t^ o o 

tH l> i— 1 

1— 1 



H _tS 



oooooooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



OO^^OCHOCOOiO^fNOOCOO 
(MOO (M(M CO iO(NCO^tiT-H(N lq 



O O O O 

o o o o 

rH |> O O 

rH <* rH 




oooooooooooooooo oooo 
oooooooooooooooo oooo 
P^O >0 tH 9^© «0 WO "O U3'N o^w o,, hJCoo 



o o © 

HO»C 



(N«OTt< 



O io 



o 
o 


tH O O 
O O O 


O O rH 

o © tM 


o 
o 


1 

1 


00 


00 r*H LO 

CO 

rH 


HHlO 

00 © 


8 

rH 


1 



© " 


iO o o 


to iO 


o 


^ O O 


O O rH 


o 




H O O 


l>- t^ 


o 


S ° 42 


tO © rJH 


© 


<L> ® O eg 


<N CO t}H 


o 


00 


00 Ttl LQ 


O -*& Qi 


o 
















£l< 




rH 


<N 


CO 


TH r-t lO 


CO 








rH 
rH 


00 o 


rH 



H 



tf°£ 





CO 


"3 
Eh 




d 


►-3 


c3 rO 




rd 


^ 




H-J 


-4-> 


tH 




r- 


o 


oi 


OS 


r, > 




Fh 


rH 




ID 




rH 


r* 


> 


d 


cd 


HHrHpH 



h-3 

tH Erj 
CU *""*• 

^ d rH 

rt fH rd 

CD ^ 72 
.^^03 

^ rH"PH 

o3 o3 ^ 

-H rH "*5 

rH rH F 

o3 c3 .S3 

Ph rH Ph 



a 



T5 d 



Or CU 

2 s 

r M 



SHHH 






bfl CD ^=^ 
CD 



Sh CD CD CD W 03 

03 •>— I >rt .rH l"""1 _< 



d d d -, d 
„ jho d d d g o 

JP< 'rd' rd ^ ^3 £> J^> O °3 *3 03 173 -rH 



CD 

bfl 


£ 


&h 


rd 


a 


o 


O 


t-s 


^ 


cd 


tn 

CD 
> 


H 


rH 


d 


CO 



91 



OOOOOOOiO 

ootoo*oooco 



coootoooootoootoooo 

COOOC^toOOOtOtotO<MtOOO 



O>OCDNN»OHWi0C0O(M00NO0000NM^H 
CO (MHiOO^ CONCOiO t-hCOCM tO tti CO <M 

tH <M rH 



CO i— I 

co oo 



o 

o 



o o o o o o o 
o o to o o o o 



o o o o o 
o o o us o 



o to o o o 
o 10 o o o 



o o 
o o 



O iONNO<00»0 
CO (NHiC^OHHN 




o <N to » o 

to i— 1 CO <M 


OOOOOOO 
*0 ^ CM C<1 


T— 1 tO 

CO t^ 


O OOOOOOO 
O 00*00000 
o tr^I>^b- O CO^O^tq^ 

co" o<f i-rto~co"T-TrH"i>r 




o o 
o o 

0^<N 

to" 


o o o 

O IQ o 

to^r^o 
r-Tc6"c<f 


o to o o o 
o >o o o o 
oo ^ o^oq^o^ 

to" ^ <m" c<r 


3,100 
7,500 


OO 

o to 


5 00 
25 00 
23 35 


CO 
CO 

CO 
CO 




to o o 
C3 o o 

CO CD 00 




o o o to o o o 

o to to C^ to o o 

CONOH tO CO 



o o 
o *o 

LO rH 



o o to 

O O CO 

to to CO 



CO 
CO 
CO 



<N <N CO 



to o o 

<M O O 

co co oo 



O O O to O O O 
O tO tO CM to O O 
W<NOh to CO 



o 
o 

d 



' o3 



H 



b ^"bJD ° a" PJ 

.9 p i ^ § S 

T3 "fi +?V 9 



03 



o 



o 



Ha 

o3 r 



o3 c3 o3 



^Qi'3 3 ^ o 



m 



rd o a3 a) _, 



O 



C r^fe *3 H S ^ ^ o gjJZJ 



£ o3 d ^ 02 ^ 



CD CD 



a a *■ 



c3 d 0) 



O ..H A 

a 



ra 1 « 03 q r 



H*^ § 

IN 

www 



92 



H 

a & 



oo 



oooooooooo*oooo*oooooooo 

OOOO^OOi-OOOOCNO^Oi^OCNCNOOOi— I 



t— IH i— I CM i-H <N ^ rH »— • 



i-H <N 



^ CDCOh io Oi CO 




oooooooooooo oooooo 
oooooooooooo oooooo 

^>OOWOC50HOHOO iOt^OO(MO 

i-H C^rHrH rH CN ,--| CN tF tH H CO O W H lO 

CO 



o 
o 



CO 



oooooooooooo 
oooooooooooo 

"* «5 O NO CO O^ 1 — * O »H O O^ 



oooooo 
oooooo 

»Q t^ O^ O^ CM^ O^ 
CO 



O 

o 

CO 



o 



o o 
*o o 



CO 



*C OOiOOOOOO 
<M TjiONOWlNOO 

t- ©h^ojncooco 
o 



oo 

CO 



j O 03 • 
5* S CD 

bxicp 5-2 


o 


o o 


lO 


»o 


iO o 


CM 






CO 


t^ 


|^< 















oo^oooooo 

t^NOINNOO 
Oh^OJNCOO© 



00^ 

co~ 



H 



1-3 © 

■+» Sh " 

_Q 2 « 

03 ^ a 

N o3 C 
Jd O «8 
H ^^ 

.3*5-3 

T w ra 



J* 
O 

'C » 

-4J CD 
Ph o3 

dO 
o . 

" S 
i-3 ►-} 



> d « 



d 

CD - 

.& d 

d -is 
bet: 

o3 o3 



pq 



cq 



d 
o 

-d £ 

gpj 

Kpl, 



^4 

o 

d ^ 

CD 3 

b ° 

~ o 

CO 

O CD 






CD 



•5 g . a 8-^pjrt-a 

d £P".3 d '? 92 

>^0 ^ ^ ^ © a 03 



F-j CD -s 



^ ^5 <5 ^5 



S§§ 



fcS<J ^ . . co co o3 

co - -r d T3 td W ^ 
.22 d ^ <u o 
"S 9 ^d 'C o cd" aT cT 
^ J2 >pq bO 5c So bD 

J2.S ,i£ ~ ^ c3 o3 o3 



93 



OO^OOOiO^OOOOOOOOOOO^OOlOOOCO 
0^0(MOO(MCOOOOOOOOOO^OO(MO^(M^OOI>- 

O OiOi0C0O^O©O H 00OO^HH^OOC><OC0O 

i— I CO OS COOH^OHiMiOio (NINHOOHHIQO 

<N i-4 CO tH CD i-l <N 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

o iO lOiO 
i-l (MO 


o o o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 

o o o o o ^ o 

i^oano^H(N 

(M i-l ^ 


o 
o 


o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

O O O *0 CD tO 
<N HiOHHT(( 


o o o o o 

O LQ O O O 
r«4 (M^oT 


o o o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 

P^Q^O O iO O 

lcTo oT to tjT h c<T 

(NHH 


O 
O 

"^ 


o o o oo o 
o o o o o o 

O O O »0 CD^LO 






6 25 

69 34 

1,006 00 


o 
o 

CD 

i— 1 


61 00 
3 00 

50 00 




oo»ooo»oooco 

iOO(MO^cqkOON 

i-htH^OOtH qo<£> 

(NOW O 

^ <N 


<M 




625 

6,934 

100,600 


o 

o 

CO 

<M~ 

tH 


6,100 
300 

5,000 




OO^OOOOOOCO 
i—l i—l ^O^O tH 00 CD 

csfo^co cT 




U Q, 



c3 



H0 

CD w 
,-G ^ Ol [fi 83 02 _r_T^-4^ 



o3 o3 S 



d5 
pg S) 

So 



o3 bC O PU Ph P-. c3 

tf rt tf rt p^ tf # tf £ £ 



£1 s 

fill 

o o ^ 
H . 



94 

odt-hooooo>oooooioooo»oc^cqooo 

OCOO*O l OOOC)toO l OOtOOOO<NO'<t , T-lOO 
IM CO N CO (N (NHcO^ W IC^OCOCSI 00 t>- 00 

T— I CO 1—1 ^ '~ i 

CO 



oS d 

H +■• 



£3 3 



oooooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

inOiO(NH05iO^»OHOOOCO 

c^ go <m cq to o co ^oco<N 



o 

o 



o 



o o 



oooooooooooooo o 
oooooooooooooo o 

csfoo"c^ c^T *o~o~co~ ^icco"(m" r>T 



o o 

o o 

iq^O^ 
o~oo~ 



s 

3 o 

© 
Oh 



00 i-l o o o 

'O CO ^ io »o 



o »0 

<M CO 



to 



»o o 

<M to 


o 

iO 


to 


<N b- 


<M 


CO 

r— I 

?o 



tO <M Ol O O 

Cq O O rH o 

i-l CO 

o^ 
co~ 



"§ o 2 * 
was *a 

5k£ a 



00 ^H o o o 


to o 


o 


CO CO O to to 


(M iO 


iO 


O tO tO rH 


<N I> 


(M 



C<l CO 



tO 



to 

i-H 

CO 



CO 



tO <N <M O O 

<M O) O iH O 



O 

CO 



CO 



S c3 pa d a 

eg ^ O o3 c3 

(DO -> - 

'£ '£ a o cd 
o o ,d .d .d 



m 

• .d 
^ "53 

d ^ 

CD • 

£PQ 



K 



c3 



S3 g J 



CD 



a d 

o3 c3 



d 

c3 

J-H 

o cu cu 
^ ^ ^5 

mmm 



c3 c3 c3 



-1-3 ro t> 
~ n O of W I 

> 5s d d c3 o 
<3 ^d >»Jh o Ph 



o 
O 

d.d 

_. c3 o3 

2*2 ao 

d c3 T3 _, 

* £ Q & 



£ £ £ £ B&aa&a&'B'B&'M 

t! E £ g u rd .-£ rd rd rd •"£ ^d sd ^d zi 



o3 ^ 

d c3 HH . O 

bB bS W> b5^ 

d # d .3 .d ^ 



i-, t-, u 
CD CO CD 

^ ^3 ^d 



£ £ £ £ £ a 



CD ' CD CD ' CD d 
d d d fl O 



95 



OOOiOHOOOOOOOO>OOOWOOOOO©OdiO 

OrhO(MC0»0OO<MrHO^0OT-HOOi— iO(MOC0OOOi— I 

OiO^HH^OOOOcDHOOHOiCCOoHiOW^iOOJiO 
ON OOCClQCO COIMN rH CO CM CO 00 QO ^ ^> CC N O 

i— I CO t*i lo cm 



rH (M 





o o 


O 


oooooooooo 




o o 




o o o 




o o 


O 


o o o 


lo o 


o o o o o 




o o 




o o *o 




HH 00 


O 


lOlOCOHCO^O 


JO JO o 




lo 1 ~ 




IO LO CO 




CO 


o 


(M CO 


r— 1 


C5 CM CO (N 00 




c<j 




CO CM ^H 




T— 1 


<N 












rH 








o o 


o 


oooooooooo 




o o 




o o o 




o o 


o 


o o o 


J-C CD 


o o 


o o o 




o o 




o O lo 




co" 


o 


io »o o 
csfccT 


1—1 °9s ^ ^ ^ *o o 

tH OS CM CO CnToo" 




LO 1^ 




LO LO O 

co~<m~h/ 




tH 


CM 












1—i 






o o 


*C 


tH o o o o o 




lo 


CO 


o 


00 CO 


O lo 


O-tf 


(N CO io O O CM iH 




1—i 


1—{ 


<N 


CO o 


O CO 


O fcO 


CO rH CM O O 


y—i »0 




CO 


CO 


T _J 


CO 


CO 


-tf 00 


CD N 


T— 1 


CO »o CO CO 






CO 


CO 




1—i 


to 




1— 1 


CM 


<N LO 






rH 








CM 




o o 


JO rH O O O O O 




LO 


CO 


o 


00 CO 


O LO 


o ^ 


CM CO lo O O CN1 i— i 




1— 1 


l—\ 


CM 


CO O 


O CO 


O^iO 


CO 


HNO^O 


rH LO 




o 


CO 


rH 


CO^ 


cq^ 


H^ 00 


«N 


i-T 


co'jo'co'co' 






CO*" 


cO~ 




rH 


io" 




"- 


<N 


<M io 






rH 








<N 





oo 

o3 c3 - 

^ ~^ tri T 



ngffl 

O O *« ^ m 
-*^ G a) © -^ 

O O o3 «H ^ <*-> 
c3 o3 o> O O *£ 
•4-i -+-» -t-i ,u> -+^> t> 



CD 

CD 

m 
d 


CD 
-to 

m 



d 


H 


03 

O 


rf, 


CJJ 

o 


% 


^ 


.. 










CD 


CD 


rn £. 


H 


H 


o3 


c3 


HH 



CH CD 
H CD 

•"Id 

o3 O 

HEh 



GO 
DO 

o 

a 

03 ?h O 
^| 



w 



03 

d 
d 

CD d 



OQ 



£\g d w 

CD S-idCDI^^j'^^-'r"'') • ,"£ 

« g I < O tf < O O °o O 
h eg -S 53 

03 C3 CD CD 



CD CD 

^d Tl 

o3 o3 
02 ,d 



CD 
.d F^ . CD 



d d 
o o 



?h ^ Jh ^ *-" ^-t 

CD CD CD Js CD CD 

'o CD "^3 © CD 'o 

CD CD CD C- 5 CD CD 



96 



XI 


iO 


h 2 


1— • ^ *o »o 


■So 5 


CD t-H CC 


<N I> 




iO <N 


CO H 
1— 1 


l§ a 






H 






x 1 


O C 


O O 


O C 


O 40 

ON 


© S 


^ (N 


10 


* & 






2-1 

be © as 


c 


O O 


c 


O 10 


^ ir: 


O l> 










-tf <N 


*C 


• 






d 


iO O O O O O 




tH O O ^ *0 O 

cq 1—1 1— 1 cni 


^ 


1— 1 


00^, 


O O 






EH £ 






© 






Ph 






5>D „, fl rf 


*o O O 


1— 1 O O tJH i& O 


^ P X rfl 


CM- tH 1- 


c^o 


^1 Sr'H 


T-T' 


CXTt-H 






03 












+3 












ca 












© 












s 
























'as 












9 






DC 






O 






H 


: 




© 




H 




a 

1 


« S r^ 

C3 C °^ 

a & ja 


£.2 § 




^T ^T ^ 


CD r/T ~ 




CD CD CD 


S 3 5 








CD CD CD 




CD CD CD 


IS ^ -SP 




a a A 






$ 


£ 


(S 


P*l 


* 



97 



X 






o^oooo^cooooooooooooooo 

O-^iOOlOTfiOOt^OOOOO 



^(NOOOHCO 

(N W ^ lC O kO CO CI CO 



"tOHOHlOHNN'* 
i— I CO Th 



03 03 


o lo o o o 


ooooooooo»ooooo 


f 1 , id 


TP 


(M O O O 


COO^OfMO^OOt^OOOO 




<M 


CO ^ 


iO © 


COM '>0 ^OHOHiOnNN 


P ci 




<N 


<tf 


i— I CO "^ 










/ 


» <v 


O 


to o o o 


ooooooooo^ooooo 


03 rt 


^h 


<N © © © 


WO^iONO^iOONOOOO 


<N 


CO ^ 


iO ©^ 


co c^ co -^ c i, rH c i s , " H ^o >— i *>• *>■ 


^"3-2 




fff 


-* 


rH CO TtT 












© 










H $ 








»o o 








i-H O 


h a 










~ S3 — 








iO rP 


s: O S3 
o § 








<N 


* 2 










o 










b 










gate 
3 of 
>nal 
te. 








iO o 

H O 


0> ? S! 33 








iO ^ 










<N 



- o 

s ^ 

o ^ 



T3 



2 a 
.5 o 



o 

o 

G 
O 

o 



c 

o 

d 

o 

o 



o PQ 



£m 



d ~+^> 



•Spq 






r3 5R 03 






fid^l^i 



a? 

— r ~PQ 
13 o 

^ a ^ 
■2^pq 

« a . 



a 
. o 

o g 

bJC-d 
d ° 
_. -^d 
d x •- 

d -^«4-r 

V.*o ° 

03 



O ^-rr; <d 



ta 

o 

8 |£ 

"S § 1 s 

ooraa 
g . r«t 

r-) ™ " u 
P" ° I § 

. 03 * rf 




o3 

^ • d 
£ 03 o 

t>, T3* l 03 

£ 1-3 



CO 



- • rH O O J5 

qqqGQPQW 



98 



Total Cash Tax 
on Personal 

and 
Real Estate. 


oiooo»ooooooooooooooooo 

iQOOOt— 000*00*00000^0000*0*0 

(MCOOHHQIMiO NhHHSHOOHNNO 

iO CD ■* <N ^ Tft <M iH r- 

iH CD 


H 1 

S3 w 

« o 

4- r-H 

ei 


(MOOOOOOOOO 
^OOOoOOOOiOo 

N O C h »C 05 N »0 o 
1—1 


oooooooooo 

000<NOOOOiO»0 

i-HrHr^i-HOOrHcq(MCD 

^ NH lO 




(NOOOOOOOOO 

»-oooooooo*oo 

(N CD OH lOOKNiO O^ 


oooooooooo 

000<MOOCOO»0*0 
r}T C<T i-T icT 


M j§ 

Cj 02 

H H 
— °-- 

o o 


tO o o 

I> O "3 

CD cq »H 


O 

o 

T-l 




to 

CD 



o o 
o *o 



o 
o 



o 

co 
O 

PQ 



O CQ 

^W 



o o 

CD CD 

a a 

WW 



S-i 

pq g 

'> 2 
o3 o 

Pq 

a"ps 
■a „• 

I s 

C3 c3 



W 

O 
<P 

■+3 

CO 

H 



o 

O 
Pi 

o 
O 

■Sggl 

JB -J ^ o3 'o T3 

, bfi 3 HH — eg - 



PI 
O 










M 



fe - to 

^ 2W 

to ^3 M 

CD S W 

'III 

o3 c3 c3 



« O 



« 4SO 

CD o3 ^ d 

!C J rJtfH O 

O M 45 O s 
L_J fl D ■» . 

§ SoWj 

■a.s § s?a 



o 



W*— ' O ^ ,— > l-i P- (L> ^2 ^5 rs ^3 

hh^hhOOOOOOhhhIW 



o a a To g 

rd CD CD O R 
o3 o3 o3 cu .5P 

WW WWW 



o*oooo 

ONO^OiO 
COOXNN N 



99 

oooooco^ooooooooo 
OOOO^^Or- io^o^ooooi^o 






CO rH rH 



CM H <N CO lO Th 

rH CO r* 



a 



o o o o 






ooooooiooooooooo 


O O O «3 






OOOOlqot-hOOoOOO^ 


o 


CO rH <M 1>- 






ocoinOooic 


<N rH xo CO >0 CO 


o 


i—l 






CO 


1—1 




o 


CO CO 


<M 


i—i 












r^ 






O O O O 






000000*000000000 


o o o *o 






o o 


o o 


*0 O rH 


o»ooooot-~o 


CO r- 1 C^ 1> 






OC0MO00»0 


NHiOCD»00 


o^ 




















1—1 






CO 


rH 




o 


CO CO 


<N~ 


T— 1 












T->, 






lO 


o 


t^ 


o 




CO 


o 


o 




l> 


to 


TP 


o 




»o 


iC 


o 




00 


t^ 


tJH 


IC 




<N 


t^ 


00 




CO 




t^ 






rH 








»o 


o 


t^ 


o 




CO 


o 


o 




t^ 


to 


Ttl 


o 




LO 


iO 


o 




00^ 


t^ 


"^ 


25 




°1 


1^ 


00 




co~ 




!>•" 






H 









c3 

rd 



QQ 
O 

.go 

T3 m 



O rH 

►>s «T qT 

03 O S 



T3 
g © 

~ o 



I r-3 M 



o3 O 
Sh CD 



u 
H 



o 
o 

> o^ 
o o d 

P £ N 
III 









CD H 

^ H 
fa * 



O) 



CJ 



:•» a 



-2 ^ 



_d pi o3 ,D £ O 



o 

a 

x 

CD 
^ T5 r< • T3 

«~ o . t3 o 
* EJJHSJ 

fa id 
. o 

> ^ "S d 

CD 03 O 



8^ 



H £ 



CD 

bJD 
T3 O 

^ - ^ o 

b «j fa w 

^ Er bjo d 

O r^i CD fa 



§s 



^3 



bJO 

d 



CO 



CD o3 



bJO O gg 



d 

TO ^ 

O -^ 

W & 

•^ d" >» 

^»rSr5 



100 



M 

cj >- s a 
o ® S 

04 q 0) 

o o W 
H 



OOOOOOOOOOLOCOOOOOOO^OOO 

oooooooooooiccqr^iooooooc^t^cQ 



o o 



00 
00 



lOHOCOHOOCJOOO 
CO (M "f CO <N 

CO 







ooooooooooo 
ooooOoooooo»oo 

OO Oi-HLQt— I O O i— IO 

Tt< i— I **? CO CN O 



<M 



o 

CO 



oooooo^ooo 

LOOOOoOC^OOO 

OOOhtHqoCQiOH 



a~.jj 


OOOOOOOOOOO 


OOOOOOLOOO 


dc£ 


ooooooooooo^oo 


>0 00000<MOCO 


gs« 


OO OrHlOrHOOrH O^ 


GC O^r-i ^OoWiQH 




•^ rH »0 CO (M O 


<M <M rH tJi 


*>5 


<M CO 


i—i 


<J g 


1—1 





CO 

S 1 



o 
o 



00 

CO 



iO CO 



GO O 
^ CO 



O 
O 



o 





O 


IQ CO 


o 


o 


beep r •£ 
» s 2 «s 


O 


(M t^ 


o 


00 


00 o 


i— 1 


<N 




CO 


TfH CO 






r^ W 











□Q 



o 

ft 
o 

■4-i *-" 



d **-• 

o © 

o .a 



§ 8« 
a § * 



^ o3 



d 
o 

fa 03 
O c3 

O o3 

3* 

o : 



c3^ 



^j 



QQ 



S g s" 

- 1 - 3 d d 

a> d *h 03 

03 O O 03 

^ l— ' .-d J"d 



■4-3 

c3 p 

03 O 



03 

a 
M 

"id 



. 03 

. W3 

03 

* C3 

• .d 

03 O 



X> 



*Jh3 



o 
o 

d 
o 









O 

03 

'53 
W 

£^ 

03 03 

■ats 

d . 

<3 d 

03 



e ^ w *?s 



03 S j§ 



d~ 03 

03 ^d 



^ 03 
03 rfi 

03 03 



-aw 

S 03* 

a -+j 

03 -jh 

-d ^ 



t3 

O 

5 § 

O ^ 03 

S « cl 

- ^^ 03 

."S o o 

.d o o 



^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



101 



WATER COMMISSIONERS REPORT. 

The Water Commissioners herewith present their 
Annual Report: — 

The work of the past year, so far as the Commissioners 
have been concerned, has been of a routine nature; no 
construction work having been done; the. repairs at the 
Pumping Station and upon the pipes being made under 
the direction of the Superintendent. 

The pumping has been done during the entire year by 
the Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Pump, the Dean Pump being 
kept in good repair to be used only in case of necessity. 

Three bad leaks have occurred in the cement-lined 
pipe and in each case a large quantity of water was lost. 

The total consumption of water for the year, as re- 
ported in the Statistics of Consumption, is taken from 
the records of the Venturii Meter at the Pumping Sta- 
tion, with the exception of the months of March and 
April, when the meter records were incomplete, and the 
Pump Records were used, and is the actual amount of 
water taken from the pond. 

This amount may seem large, but when we consider 
that 28,098,800 gallons or 45.7% of the total consump- 
tion passes through 35 meters and that the balance of 
54.3% cares for the leaks as noted above, the loss at 
the Reservoir through evaporation and leakage, which 
during a portion of the time between April 1 and Oct. 1, 
according to the Venturii Meter Records, was over 
2,600,000 gallons, together with the amount of water lost 
in blowing off the pipes at the dead ends, which is quite 
an item, and also whatever leakage occurs on the twenty- 



102 

four miles of pipe; the amount is not excessive. We 
doubt if there is another municipality in the country 
which has so long a pipe line to supply so small a popula- 
tion as this Town. 

The water in the Pond continues at a very low level, 
notwithstanding the fact that Concord has drawn but 
small amounts during the latter part of the year. 

Electric lights have been installed at the Pumping 
Station at a small expense. 

The Treasurers Report shows uncollected water rates 
of $85. 

In order to keep the water works self-sustaining, as 
the Town voted some years ago, it will be necessary to 
keep the expenses at the minimum during the next four 
years, when the $1,000 bonds now becoming due each 
year will be extinguished. 

For the Commission, 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Chairman. 



103 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING FEBRUARY i, 191 1. 

Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 
General Statistics. 

Population by census of 1905, 1122. 
Date of construction, 1874. 
By whom owned, Town. 
Source of supply, Sandy Pond. 
Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics. 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon, Cross compound Fly Wheel 
Pump, 12"and20i"x8f"xl2". 

Deane Compound Condensing Duplex Pump 7J" and 
16"x9J"xl8". 

Description of fuel used. 

Kind, Hard and Soft coal. 

Brand of coal, Lackawanna, New River. 

Average price of hard coal per gross, ton, delivered 
$6.65. 

Average price of soft coal per gross ton, delivered, 
$6.65. ' 

Percentage of ash, 22%. 

Wood, price per cord, $5.00. 

Coal consumed for the year in pumping, 283,394. 

Pounds of wood consumed, equivalent amount of coal, 
866. 

Total equivalent coal consumed for the year, 284,260 
lbs. 

Total pumpage for the year, 68,969,800 gallons. 



104 

Average static head against which pumps work, 148.5 
feet. 

Average dynamic head against which pumps work, 160 
feet. 

Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent 
coal, 242. 

Duty, 

Cost of Pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, viz., 
$2,491.92. 

Per million gallons pumped, $36.13. 
Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic), 22.5 
cents. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water. 

Estimated total population at date, 1,122. 

Estimated population on lines of pipe, 1,036. 

Estimated population supplied, 1,020. 

Total consumption for the year, 68,969,800 gallons. 

Passed through meters, 28,098,803 gallons. 

Percentage of consumption metered, 45.7. 

Average daily consumption, 188,953 gallons. 

^Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 124. 

*Gallons per day to each consumer, 139.4. 

^Gallons per day to each tap, 509. 

Cost of supplying water, per million gallons, figured on 
total maintenance, viz., $3,772.16, = $54.69. 

Total cost of supplying water, per million gallons, 
figured on total maintenance+interest on bonds, $100.73. 

Total cost of supplying water per million gallons figured 
on total maintenance + interest on bonds + sinking fund, 
$132.24. 

Total cost of supplying water figured on total main- 
tenance, interest on bonds, sinking fund and payment of 
$1,500 in bonds, $153.98. 



105 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System. 



Mains. 

1 . Kind of pipe, cast iron 

and cement lined. 

2. Sizes, from 4" to 12". 

3. Extended 00 ft. dur- 

ing year. 

4. Discontinued 00 ft. 

during year. 

5. Total now in use, 

24,077 miles. 

6. Cost of repairs per 

mile, $0.00. 

7. Number of leaks per 

mile, .50. 

8. Length of pipes less 

than 4 inches diam., 
i miles. 

9. Number of hydrants 

added during year, 

10. Number of hydrants 

(public ) now in use, 
111. 

11. Number of stop gates 

added during year, 
3. 

12. Number of stop gates 

now in use, 116. 

13. Number of stop gates 

smaller than 4 inch, 
0. 

14. Number of blow-offs, 

18. 

15. Range of pressure on 

mains 40 lbs. to 60 
lbs. 

*The metered water sold 
the total consumption in 



16. 



17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 

21. 



22. 



23. 



24. 



25. 



26. 



Services. 
Kind of pipe, galv. 

iron and cement 

lined. 
Sizes, f" to 4". 
Extended 000 ft. 
Discontinued 00 feet. 
Total now in use, 00 

miles. 
Number of service 

taps added during 

year, 7. 
Number now in use, 

275. 
Average length of 

service, 12 feet. 
Average cost of serv- 
ice for the year, 

$6.68. 
Number of meters 

added, 1. 
Number now in use, 

35. 



to R. R. Co is deducted from 
making these averages. 



106 



WATER. 

Payments. 

J. T. Laird, Services as Superintendent and 

Engineer, and Expenses, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 
Roger Sherman, " 

A. J. Dougherty, " 

William Ryan, 
Samuel Howes, " 

Isaac N. MacRae, " 

P. J. Whelan, 

Robert D. Donaldson, " 
Frank H. Cunningham, " 
Dan MacAskill, 
Highway Department, " 
National Express Co., Express, 
Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 
M. H. Doherty, Carriage Hire, 
S. R. Snelling, Coal, 
Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 
Cemetery Commissioners, Wood, 
D. E. Sherman, 1} cords Wood, 
W. S. Johnson, Professional Services, 
S. H. Blodgett, Expenses, 
First National Bank, Coupons, 
First National Bank, Bonds, 
S. J. Ross, Catering, 
Cunningham Bros., Balance, % Contract, 
W. Wheeler, Plants, 



$1,006 85 


84 50 


60 20 


128 57 


5 00 


6 44 


116 87 


25 25 


72 16 


137 55 


1 30 


7 00 


7 90 


6 09 


27 25 


852 61 


126 41 


32 50 


9 00 


1,324 58 


3 00 


3,175 00 


1,500 00 


45 00 


66 67 


7 50 



107 



Hartford Steam Boiler Ins. Co., Premium, 

James A. WJHunter, Reading Meters, 

M. F. Dougherty, Reading Meters, 

George E. Crosby, Printing, 

William C. Pierce, Rent of Land, 

Harry J. Cooper, Wiring Pumping Station, 

Lincoln Press, Printing, 

C. L. Todd, Treas., Sinking Fund, 

Charles S. Wheeler, Water Commissioner, 

S. H. Blodgett, 

C. S. Smith, 

J. S. Hart, M. D., 

George L. Chapin, " " 

George L. Chapin, Collector, 

Garlock Packing Co., Supplies, 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., 

Boston S. P. R. & Supply Co., 

Chapman Valve Co., 

National Meter Co., 

Walworth Mfg. Co., 

Chadwick Boston Light Co., 

Wadsworth Howland Co., 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., 

Union Water Meter Co., 

H. W. Worthington, 

M. J. Drummond & Co., 

Edson Mfg. Co., 

Hodge Boiler Co., 

Builders' Iron Foundry, 

Davis & Farnham Mfg. Co., 

J. L. Chapin & Son, 

S. R. Snelling, 

Total, 



$75 00 
9 00 
3 00 

12 00 
5 00 

33 75 
2 80 



2,173 


37 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


150 


00 


17 


18 


10 79 


168 42 


63 


41 


18 


20 


49 


73 


21 


63 


3 


27 


146 


94 


15 


38 


8 40 


24 49 


4 00 


10 


72 


15 


24 


31 


37 


9 


44 


65 


36 


$12,233 ,09 



108 



CD 
<* 

to 



CO 





O <N 

o o 




O H 

O T-l 

tO o 


. 


cq co 

00 OS 







O 



»o 
00 



6 



O 

>-3 ^ 



<1 



O 

Ph 



CD 

CD 
?h 
CD 



r— I 

PQ 



CD 

■+-S 

C5 



pq 



OOOOiOOOiC CO 
COOO^OiO rfrl 



co co *o ^ to o 

T— I T^t T— I T— I T— I lO 



to 



m 



g 

xn 

s ^ 

O £ 

pq£> 



OOJOON 
i— I tJH to iO CO 

^H (M CO ^ 00 

00^ co^ c<^ 

co~ r-T cT 

CO i— i 



eq 

o 



»o 
oo~ 



« 









<3 










£ 










CD 


c3 








CD 


CD 








tf 


>> 








T3 


o 








Pi 


«^ 




02 


+a 


<3 

02 


g 







02 
CD 


"S3 


'S3 


Ph C3 


CD 


ft 


"CD -4-3 




5a 


■+2 


CD £ CD 

Ph^£ 


C 










H 











H 
H 



"3 

CD 

CD 
© 

- ° 2 CD 

a •§! "3 S| -s 



PI 

.2 
"•+3 
o 



109 



OUTSTANDING WATER BONDS. 

Issue of 1894, due one each year, $4,000 00 

Issue of 1897, due 1917, 10,000 00 

Issue of 1900, due 1930, 23,000 00 

Issue of 1902, due 1932, 9,000 00 

Issue of 1903, due 1933, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1904, due 1934, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1906, due 1936, 14,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due 1937, 4,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due $500 each year, 8,500-00 



$82,500 00 



WATER RECEIPTS. 

Domestic, $7,753 49 

Meters, 3,685 60 



$11,439 09 
Uncollected, 1910, 85 37 

$11,524 46 



no 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN. 



The effort of the Tree Warden this year has been to 
hold the gypsy and brown-tail moths in check along the 
roads the government were not looking after, and on 
private estates where the owners wished it and were 
willing to pay for the same. 

In the winter of 1909-10 about 300 acres were looked 
over, and the gypsy moth nests found were creosoted. 
A considerable number of brown tail nests were also 
taken off of private estates. Tanglefoot was put on the 
roadside trees where it was used the year before, and 
on private grounds, on trees along walls and other 
places w^here a large number of gypsy moth nests were 
liable to be hid. Not much burlap was used this year. 

As early as satisfactory spraying could be done, one 
sprayer was started spraying on the roadsides, and one 
on private grounds. 

Most of the roadsides looked after by the Town were 
gone over twice. The second spraying saving a good 
deal of time in looking over the tanglefoot, and the 
number of nests to be climbed for later. 

As soon as satisfactory spraying could be done in the 
woods, the third sprayer was started. 

Not much injury to the foliage was caused by the 
moths along the roadsides, though in a number of places 
the woods were stripped up to the road limit cared for, 
making a difficult line to hold. 

About 100 acres were sprayed on private places without 
any assistance of the owner — about 220 with more or 



Ill 

less assistance from the owner. When the weather 
was not suitable for spraying, and for a few days before 
and after, the tanglefoot was freshened by combing, to 
keep the caterpillars from crossing, and those below it 
were killed. 

Trimming was done for electric wires along some ten 
miles of road. 

It is a difficult matter to free the wires without seri- 
ously injuring many of the good shade trees. 

Dead limbs and some of the least desirable trees were 
removed on several miles of road this fall. 

In December and January, just passed, about 200 
acres have been looked over, and the gypsy moth nests 
found creosoted. 

The total expenditure for the moth work was $6,039.97. 
$2,029 was in supplies from the state, which do not appear 
on the Treasurer's account, and about $1,000 also was re- 
ceived as cash reimbursement from the state, and $2,000 
was also turned over to the Treasurer from private work 
in Town. 

I wish to thank the Advisory Committee on the moth 
work for their interest and advice. 

U. S. Government Work. 

The government work, which has helped out the 
Town of Lincoln so much in the way of putting our road- 
sides bordered by woodlands into condition for the 
easier control of the gypsy and brown-tail moths, have 
about completed their work here, and are working in 
the towns west of us, where it seems more needed. 

These trees along the streets they have cut out should 
be protected from the work of the moths, to save the 
trees, and prevent the spreading of the moths by passing 
vehicles, so that the benefit of their work should not be 
-lost to the Town, or the government. 



112 

Wilt Disease. 

For some reason, possibly from the carrying over of 
the wilt disease, the amount of woodland in town stripped 
by the gypsy moths this year was not so great as the 
number of nqsts would indicate. 

Neither have starvation and the wilt disease cleared 
them from so much area as last year, or as I anticipated. 
The outlook for this year is not good. For some reason 
the moths are not so bad in the towns this side of Medford 
where the gypsy moths started, as they have been. 

That condition appears to be coming this way, and 
to have reached nearly to the east border of the Town. 

In Lincoln probably one-tenth of the private land is 
being cared for, and probably not more than that, in 
the portions outside the villages, in the other towns have 
been cared for. So hand work would not entirely ac- 
count for it. 

Scientists have tried several ways of bringing on the 
wilt disease earlier in the season than it comes in nature, 
hoping in this way to kill off a larger proportion. They, 
and others, are planning a number of experiments for the 
coming season. 

Parasites. 

While impatient at not seeing more definite results 
from the parasites that are being liberated, it may be well 
to remember that the gypsy moths were in the open 
twenty years before they came to the attention of the 
public, so that State Aid was given for their suppression. 

Several of the imported parasites, which it is hoped, 
will be helpful in the control of the gypsy and brown-tail 
moths, are known to have spread over large areas from 
where they were liberated. Some, from their present 
spread, would indicate that in a year or two more they 
will be spread as widely as the gypsy and brown-tail 
moths. 



113 

I have been pleased in my various visits at the parasite 
labratory to see the careful effort being made to develop 
that branch of the control work against these moths. 
It is interesting to watch the battle of these scientists 
in their effort to check the ravages of these moths. 

Elm Leaf Beetle. 

The elm leaf beetle appeared seriously over the Town 
for the first time the past year or two. Apparently 
two sprayings will hold them in check, when done under 
favorable conditions. Those having large old elms will 
do well to watch them carefully, and keep them in good 
condition, lest they be injured or killed by their numerous 
insect enemies. 

The first spraying is for the adult beetle, which have 
wintered over in various sheltered places, and may be 
applied to the upper side of the leaves as soon as they 
come of full size, and is important, if the beetles are 
thick, to kill off as many as . possible before the eggs are 
laid. One indication of their numbers is the number of 
holes, similar to shot holes, in the leaves. 

The second spraying should be done when the larvae 
begin feeding, the latter part of June, and should be 
applied to the under side of the leaves, where the larvae 
feed, leaving the veins and upper side of the leaf. 

Leopard Moth. 

The leopard moth is considered one of the enemies 
which have caused the death of so many of the elms 
around Harvard College, and other parts of Cambridge. 

Three or four specimens of injury to limbs by borers 
have come to my attention the past year which appear 
like the work of this moth, and were so considered by 
people I referred them to. 



114 

The English sparrow, by driving off the native birds, 
such as nut hatches, chickadees, and smaller wood- 
peckers leave the trees much more open to the attack of 
such insects. 

A few years ago I saw a pair of English sparrows in an 
apple tree in my garden pitching out from their nest 
young nut hatches that were nearly ready to fly. 

Electric Wires. 

Electric wires have been run along ten miles of our 
most attractive roads, presenting a difficult problem to 
cut out enough to get good service on the wires, and not 
seriously injure many of the good young trees the wires 
run through. 

The Secretary of the Forestry Association, one of 
whose duties is to give advice to Tree Wardens in their 
endeavor to protect the roadside trees, and Professor 
Stone of Amherst, who does a good deal in the same line, 
after going over the roads with me, where the electric 
wires run, each said good work had been done, both for 
the convenience of the wires, and for preserving the trees. 

In doing this and other trimming we have endeavored 
to do the necessary cutting in a way not to jar ones feel- 
ings, but to leave it with as much as we could of the effect 
of the natural growth of nature. 

It seems to me desirable to keep the appearance of 
some of our ways as distinctly country roads if possible. 

Old Growth Woods. 

Lincoln has several pieces of fine old-growth wood, 
which I am particularly anxious should be preserved. 
Most of it is owned by people who appreciate it, and are 
giving it the necessary care. It is doubtful if the younger 
growth of white pine and pasture oak will ever give us 
such fine specimens as some of these which we still have. 



115 
Trees Resistant to the Gypsy Moth. 

Mr. Rogers, in charge of the U. S. Government work, 
kindly gave me the following list of trees resistent in 
the order named, to the work of the gypsy moth. 

Ash, horse-chestnut, butternut, hickory, and trees 
with compound leaves and evergreen, lilac and soft 
maples. 

The following list subject to attack, in the order 
named: — 

Apple, oak, willow, birch and elm. 

To show that one spraying will not necessarily keep 
the gypsy moths from laying their eggs on a tree, — I saw 
where a gypsy moth caterpillar had turned into a pupa 
of a female gypsy while hanging on the dry arsenate of 
lead and a few inches above the soft paste of the arsenate, 
*n a keg on my place. 



Danger from Spraying. 

It requires careful judgment, especially along road- 
sides, to apply ten tons of poison without doing con- 
siderable damage. 

Difficulty in getting water to the sprayers, sometimes 
causes delay. Before the end of the season most of the 
smaller ponds were dried up, and water was crossing the 
roads in Town in but four places, and in these the water 
was very low. 

Much credit is due to good work done by owners on 
their own lands. Spraying in August for the brown-tails 
has been tried, and may be a good way to hold them 
in check. The poison from the late spraying for gypsy 
moths in places seems to have stayed on and killed off 



116 

many of the young brown-tail caterpillars when they 
began to feed in the middle or last of August. 

The San Jose Scale is thoroughly spread over the 
Town and is a great menace to the orchards. 



Some Observations. 

It is not easy to tell what work the gypsy moths will 
do in a given locality. In two places in Town which I 
have been watching, of about 150 acres each, the gypsy 
moths have stripped the foliage and apparently have died 
off through starvation and wilt disease, so that scarcely 
a new nest is in sight. In one, a few white oaks are dead, 
but practically no damage is done. In the other nearly 
all the trees are killed. In one place where the moths 
have killed the hardwood trees the worst, the seedling 
pines are entirely uninjured, and are looking especially 
thrifty. In another place the seedling pines up to 15 or 
20 feet high are killed, and the hardwood trees prac- 
tically uninjured. This year in places the gypsy nests 
are much heavier on the black oaks than the white. 
This is the first year the brown-tail moths have been 
serious generally over the Town. Unless fungus or 
some disease sets in, the tops of the white oaks over 
considerable areas are likely to be killed the coming 
season, from the stripping by the brown-tails, followed 
by the feeding of the gypsy moths. Brown-tail moth 
nests should be taken off before the 1st of April, and the 
gypsy moths hatch by the 1st to the 10th of May. 

Where the brown-tai] moths are thick, spraying is 
unsatisfactory. Where the gypsy moths are thick a 
single spraying is not sufficient. 

On one piece of road where the brush and gypsy moth 
nests were so thick it was difficult to do satisfactory 
work • creosoting the nests, no creosoting was done. 



117 

Three sprayings held the foliage quite well, except on 
some of the white oaks, where the brown-tails kept the 
foliage down, so there was nothing to catch the spray on. 
On these trees at the end of the season the gypsy-moth 
nests were extremely thick. 

One who is familiar with the work here, and the con- 
ditions in Europe, thinks the final solving of the moth 
problem will come through planting of evergreens and 
trees they do not attack. 

Very respectfully, 

EDWARD R. FARRAR. 



118 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Trustees respectfully herewith submit the usual 
statistical exhibit of the Librarian, presenting the essen- 
tial facts connected with the working of the institution 
under her charge during the past year. As no material 
change in the methods of conducting the Library have 
taken place during the past year, the Trustees do not 
consider it necessary to submit any further detailed 
report. 

The Trustees would ask for $400, the same amount as 
was appropriated last year for the institution; this, in 
addition to the dog tax. They would further ask for a 
special appropriation of $300, to complete the installation 
of the electric light service, which will be a great con- 
venience and conducive to an improved and increasing 
use of the reading room. 

By order of the Trustees. 

CHARLES F. ADAMS, 

Chairman. 



119 



eocvu-^cooojoaoooooo-tfoocoi 

«fc <N HHlOHOOriTfO 0* 

<N<N CO 



o 
_2 d 






03 lO 



H 

d . » r » E s - a 

-5 dH S o >>° 

"3 03 03 cS'Ti ro 

dM .pu.22^ 1 



3« 






So 



+=.2 >>>>d 

O m- 1 - • 

"t: _r - d o 

03 >>W O 

drO^ 1 — 



d 



,2 > 



M ® 



03 PI 

d <D 

w & ..a ft 
-* » t a 






03 Phi • d o 



fc3S^ M .£o j3 $s r 3PQ2!3um 
d 



|l|>iBS.l.llI|l8|Wfllj.|g| 



(NiOOOCOCDO 

HOHN O 

CM <N 



^o? 



3 o H ..a s 

+3 a o-d 

os ® a c r . 

""" ©,_, O o 
«S dTo =3 

- 2 2 9 a; 



. 03 O . 03 § 



a 



i r" 



d 370- 
<!oqO 



MOSNOO 
lOHNHHO 

CO CO ■* 



ado 
SPu •££ ft 

£d£aa a 

fH ej « o3 03 

d a sag 

„, O O o o o 

80POOH 

d 



HO (NO-* 



03 d 03 
Md M 

fljrv. © 

d_ 2— . 

3Z3 d — 
r , Di-0) 
W ro o3_Q 



d a> .,_: . 



• OX! o 



«*.* coo ceo 



120 



STATISTICS OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY, 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEB., 191 1. 

Number of volumes in Library Feb. 1, 1910, 9,061 

Increase by purchase, 187 

Increase by gift, 27 

Increase by binding periodicals, 6 

Total increase, * 220 

Number of volumes rebound, 34 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1911, 9,281 

Total delivery of books for year, 6,640 

Largest delivery in one day (Feb. 2, ) 121 

Smallest delivery in one day (May 4, ) 39 
Number of new names of borrowers registered 

past year, 67 

Number of days library was open, 103 



121 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Gifts of books, periodicals, etc., have been received 
during the year, from the following persons: — Hon. C. F. 
Adams, Mr. Geo. Baldwin, Mrs. Abram English Brown, 
Mr. Arthur Chapin, Mr. Edward S. Crockett, Mr. J. De 
Cordova, Mr. Joseph Debar, Mr. Edward F. Farrar, 
Mr. Jerome D. Greene, Mr. K. C. Gillette, Mr. E. Durn- 
ing Lawrence, Mr. F. B. Moffat, Mr. J. C. Melvin, Mrs. 
H. C. Richardson, Mr. Geo. G. Tarbell, Mr. C. Lee Todd, 
Mrs. A. W. Wheelwright. 

The most valuable gift of the year being several large 
foreign photographs, which have been framed, and will 
soon be hung on the Library walls. For this gift the 
Library is indebted to Mr. Adams. 



122 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ACCESSIONS TO THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR 1910. 
BIOGRAPHY. 

Baldwin, W. President of the Boston Young Men's Christ- 
tian Union, 1868-1907; President Emeritus, 
July 1, 1907 to June 8, 1909. (Biographical 

sketch) *631.5 

Banks, Nathaniel Prentiss. Record of the dedication of the 
Statute of Major-Genernl Nathaniel P. Banks, 

September 16, 1908 *631.7 

Benson, Arthur, Editor. Letters of Queen Victoria: A 
selection from Her Majesty's correspondence 
between the years 1837 and 1861. 3 vols. . 632.16 

Brooks, John Graham. An American citizen: Life of 

William H. Baldwin, Jr *631.3 

Brown, Abram English. A memorial of A. E. Brown . . 631 . 6 

Earland, Ada. Ruskin and his circle 632.17 

Eggleston, George Cary. Recollections of a varied life. . . 631 . 1 

Emerson, Edward Waldo, and Forbes, W. E. Editors. 

Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson. 2 vols. . 636 . 1 

Evans, Robley D. An Admiral's log 636 . 4 

Fuller, Thomas E. The Right Honorable Cecil John Rhodes . 631 . 2 

Gilchrist, Beth Bradford. Life of Mary Lyon . . . 636.3 

Harland, Marion. Autobiography; Story of a long life . 534.19 

Hodges, William Romaine. Carl Wimar: A biography *631.8 

Jefferson, Eugenie Paul. Intimate recollections of Joseph 

Jefferson 632.14 

Jewett, Sophia. God's troubador: Story of St. Francis of 

Assissi 633.19 

Marcosson, Isaac F. Autobiography of a clown . . . 631.4 

Milmine, Georgine. Life of Mary Baker G. Eddy, and the 

history of Christian Science .... 632.6 

Pennell, E. R. and J. Life of J. M. Whistler. 2 vols. . . 631.9 

White, Andrew Dickson. Seven great statesmen in the war 

of humanity with unreason . . . . 631 . 10 

Winter, William. Other days being chronicles and memories 

of the stage ....... 632.15 

Villard, Oswald Garrison. John Brown: 1800-1859. A 

biography fifty years after 631 . 11 



123 

HISTORY. 

Breasted, James Henry. History of Egypt: From the 

earliest times to the Persian conquest . . . 352.5 

Eggleston, George Cary. History of the Confederate war; 
its causes and its conduct; a narrative and 
critical history. 2 vols 352.6 

Hart, Albert Bushnell and others. Decisive battles of 

America 356.11 

McMaster, John Bach. History of the people of the United 

States 314.15 

Paxson, Frederic Logan. Last American frontier . . 352.7 

Trevellyan, George Macaulay. Garabaldi and the Thousand 353. 15 



DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL 

Clarke, Helen Archibald. Browning's Italy; a study of Ital- 
ian life and art in Browning ..-'.. 

Longfellow's country 

Crawford, Mary Caroline. The story of the city and its 

people during the nineteenth century 

Day, E. Hermitage. Oberammergau and the Passion Play 

Franck, Harry A. A vagabond journey around the world: 

A narrative of personal experience, illustrated 

with more than one hundred photographs 

Furlong, Charles Wellington. Gateway to the Sahara: 

Observations and experiences in Tripoli . 
Grenfell, Wilfred T. and others. Labrador: The country 

and its people 

Hart, Albert Bushnell. The Southern South .... 
Hedin, Sven. Trans-Himalaya; discoveries and adventures 

in Tibet. 2 vols 441 . 13 

Holder, Charles Frederick. Recreations of a sportsman on 

the Pacific coast 441.21 

Howells, William Dean. Seven English cities .... 444.20 

Johnson, Clifton. Picturesque St. Lawrence . . . 437 . 10 

Mahaffy, J. P. Rambles and studies in Greece . . . 437 . 9 

Marden, Philip Sanf ord. Travels in Spain .... 435 . 26 

Mills, Enos A. Wild life on the Rockies .... 416.29 

Palmer, Frederick. Central America and her problems; an 
account of a journey from the Rio Grande to 
Panama, with introductory chapter on Mexico 
and her relations to her neighbors . . . 441.15 

Peary, Robert E. North Pole; its discovery in 1909 under 
the auspices of the Arctic Club; with an introd- 
duction by Theodore Roosevelt .... 441.18 



433 


.22 


433 


.21 


441 


.24 


441 


.17 


441 


.16 


433.23 


416 


.30 


441 


.22 



124 

Roosevelt, Theodore. African game trials; an account of the 
African wanderings of an American hunter- 
naturalist "... 441.19 

Tearle, Christian. Rambles with an American . . . 441.20 

Viaud, J. (Pierre Loti.) Egypt. Translated from French 

by W. P. Baines 441 14 

Winter, Willi am. Shakespeare's England .... 441.23 

SCIENCE, USEFUL ARTS, ETC. 

Allen, Grant. Evolution in Italian Art .... 142.27 

Angell, Emmett Dunn. Play: Comprising games for the 

Kindergarten, playground, school-room, and 

college; how to coach and play girl's basket 

ball, etc 131.4 

Bancroft, Jessie H. Games 134 . 30 

Caffin, Charles H. Story of Dutch painting .... 141 . 15 
Fernhow, Bernard E. Care of trees: In lawn, street, and 
park; with a list of trees and shrubs for decora- 
tive use 141 . 17 

Garrison, Elisha Ely. Accounting every business man should 

know 141.14 

Godfrey, HoUis. Health of the City 131.6 

Green, Olive. How to cook vegetables 137.21 

Hill, Janet Mackenzie. Cooking for two: A handbook for 

young housekeepers 137 . 17 

Jordan, Whitman Howard. Feeding of animals . . . 137 . 20 
Lyon, D. Everett. How to keep bees for profit . . . 141 . 18 
Miles, Manly. Stock breeding; a practical treatise on the 
laws of development and heredity to the im- 
provement and breeding of domestic animals . *214 4 
Roberts, Isaac Phillips. Fertility of the land: Summary 
sketch of the relationship of farm practise to 
the maintaining and increasing of the produc- 
tivity of the soil 137.18 

The horse . 137.19 

Schofield, Alfred T. How to keep fit: An unconventional 

manual 137.22 

Sedgwick, Mabel Cabot. The garden month by month: 
Describing the appearance, color, dates of 
bloom, height and cultivation of all desirable, 
hardy herbaceous perenials for the formal or 
wild garden, with additional lists of aquatics, 

vines, ferns, etc 141.16 

Serviss, Garrett P. Curiosities of the sky .... 141 . 13 

Thomas, J. Arthur. Darwinism and human life . . 131.5 

Thoreau. Notes on New England birds .... 131.3 



125 



RELIGION. PHILOSOPHY . 



Begbie, Harold. Twice born men; a clinic in regeneration; 

a footnote in narrative to Professor William 

James' "Varieties in religious experiences" 
Chapman, Edward Mortimer. English literature in account 

with religion 

Eliot, Charles W. Durable satisfactions of life 

Howells, W. D. and others. In after days: Thoughts on the 

future life 

James, William. Pragmatism; a new name for some old 

ways of thinking . 

King, Henry Churchill. The ethics of Jesus . . . 

Munsterberg, Hugo. Eternal life 

Rowland, Eleanor Harris. The right to believe 
Students and the present missionary crisis: 
Addresses delivered before the Sixth International Conven- 
tion of the Students' Volunteer Movement for Foreign 
Missions, Rochester, New York, Dec. 29, 1909, to January 2, 
1910 



1125.18 

1132.4 
1132.9 

1132.7 

1132.6 

1132.5 

1125.19 

1122.15 



1132.8 



FICTION. 

Arnim, Mary Anette (Beauchamp) grafin von. The cara 

vaners 

Atherton, Gertrude. Bell in the fog; and other stories 

Tower of Ivory 

Bacheller, Irving. The master 

Barclay, Florence L. The rosary .... 
Bell, J. J. Wullie McWattie's master 
Booth, Edward C. The doctor's lass 

Borrow, George. Lavengro 

Brainerd, Eleanor. Personal conduct of Belinda 
Brown, Alice. Country neighbors .... 
Chambers, Robert E. Ailsa Paige .... 
Churchill, Winston. A modern chronicle 
Clemens, Samuel L. (Mark Twain. ) Extract from Captain 

Stormfield's visit to heaven 
Connor, Ralph. The foreignor .... 

Conrad, Joseph. The secret agent .... 
Crawford, F. Marion. The undesirable goyerness . 
Davis, Richard Harding. Once upon a time . 
De La Pasture, Mrs. Henry. The tyrant 
De Morgan, William. An affair of dishonor 

It never can happen again . 
Doubleday, Roman. Red house on Rowan Street 
Du Bois, Mary Constance. Lass of the Silver Sword 



757.17 
758.23 
758.15 
758.11 

756.7 
757.19 

756.3 
757.18 
757.10 
758.14 
756.12 
717.27 

758.17 

758.12 

716.29 

717.28 

757.15 

758.1 

756.4 

758.9 

757.9 

758.4 



126 



Eggleston, George Cary. A Carolina Cavalier: A romance 

of the American Revolution .... 716.27 

Foote, Mary Hallcck. Royal Americans . . • . . . 757.14 

French, Alice (Octave Thanct. ) By inheritance . . 757.6 
Garland, Hamlin. Cavanagh; forest ranger, a romance of 

the mountain West 721.20 

Gilman, Bradley. A son of the desert 758 . 8 

Green, Anna Katharine. The amethyst box .... *758 . 25 

The Leavenworth case *758 . 22 

Haggard, H. Rider. Ayesha *758 . 19 

The brethren *758.20 

Hardy, Thomas. Tess of the D'urbervilles .... 758 . 7 

Herrick, Robert. Life for a life 757.13 

Johnson, Owen. The varmint 756.11 

Kelly, Myra. Little aliens 716 . 28 

King, Basil. The wild olive 756 . 2 

Lagerlof , Selma. Girl from the Marsh Croft .... 757 . 7 

Lane, Elinor Macartney. The apple tree cottage . . . 756 . 14 

Lane, Mrs. John. According to Maria . . . . 717.26 

Lee, Jennette. Happy Island : A new "Uncle William" story 757 . 12 

Lincoln, Joseph C. The depot master 757 . 4 

Locke, William J. Simon the jester . . . . 757.3 

Maartens, Maarten. Price of Lis Doris 758 . 3 

Marriott, Charles. Genevia *758.24 

Martin, Helen Reimensnyder. The crossways . . . 756 . 6 

Mason, A. E. W. At the Villa Rose . . . . . 756.5 

Meredith, George. Celt and Saxon 756 . 10 

Montgomery, L. H. Kilmeny of the orchard . . . . 757.2 

Morris, Gouveneur. Voice in the rice 757.11 

Nicholson, Meredith. House of a thousand candles . . *758 . 18 

Lords of high decision 758 . 2 

Orcy, Baroness. Gates of Kamt *757 . 1 

Phelps, Elizabeth Stuart. Oath of Allegiance and other 

stories 758.16 

Porter, Sidney (O. Henry, pseud. ) Strictly business; more 

stories of the four million . . . . . 717.29 

Whirligigs 757.16 

Rame, Louisa De La ("Ouida"' ) Under two flags . . 756.9 

Ray, Anna Chapin. Over the quichsands .... 758 . 13 

Rider, Henry Milner. The twisted foot 757.5 

Robins, Elizabeth. The Florentine frame .... 758.5 

Royle, Edwin Milton. The silent call 756.1 

Sedgwick, Anne Douglas. Franklin Winslow Kane . . 721 . 17 

Thurston, Katherine Cecil. Fly on the wheel . . . *758.21 

Tracy, Louis. Captain of the Kansas 721 . 19 

Viaud, J. (Pierre Loti, pseud. ) An Iceland fisherman . 756.13 
♦Indicates the book was a gift. 



127 

Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. Lady Merton, colonist . 917.25 

Watts, Mary S. Nathan Burke 716.30 

Wells, H. G. History of Mr. Polly 757.8 

Wister, Mrs. A. L., Translator. The lonely house . . 721.18 

Worth, Nicholas. The Southerner 758.6 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
Churchill, W. Liberalism and the social problem . . 1331.5 

Du Bois, Paul. The influence of the mind on the body . 1331 .7 

Fillebrown, C. B. The A. B. C. of taxation .... *1537.4 

George, William R. The Junior Republic; its history and 

ideals 1331.6 

Gulick, Luther H. Mind and work ..... 1337.8 

Krehbiel, Henry Edward. A book of Operas; their histories, 

their plots, and their music 1316.11 

Mabie, Hamilton W. Book of Christmas .... 1316.12 

Melvin, Memorial. Sleepy Hollow cemetery: Concord, 

Massachusetts; a brother's tribute: Exercises at 

dedication *1537.2 

Lawrence, Sir Edwin Durning. Bacon is Shakespeare . 1537.3 

Leupp, F. The Indian and his problem 1325.28 

Munsterberg, Hugo. American problems: From the point 

of view of a psj^chologist 1531.2 

Proceedings of a Conference of Governors; in the White 

House, Washington, D. C. , May 13-15, 1908 . *1531 . 1 

Sangster, Margaret E. Fairest girlhood .... 1331 . 3 

Spears, John R. Story of the American Merchant Marine 1331 . 4 

Stratton-Porter, Gene. Birde of the Bible .... 1316.13 

Tucker, William Jewett. Personal power; counsels to college 

men 1525.26 

Public mindedness; an aspect of citizenship 
considered in various addresses given while 
President of Dartmouth College . . . 1331.2 

Songs sung at a dinner given by J. Waldo Smith and C. L. 

Harrison to the Commissioners and Staff of 
Board of Water Supply at Terrace Garden, 
N. Y., City Dec. 10, 1910 .... *1436.4 

Van Dyke, Henry. Spirit of America 1337.7 

Washington, Booker. Story of the negro. 2 vols. . . 1316 . 10 

POETRY. DRAMA. 

Adams, Charles Follen. Yawcob Strauss; and other poems *1436.10 

Cooke, John. Dublin book of Irish verse .... 1436.6 
Hornbrooke, Francis Bickford. Ring and the book by 

Robert Browning. An interpretation . . 1436 . 9 

Kipling, Rudyard. Collected verse 1436.8 

♦Indicates the book was a gift. 



128 



Moses, Montrose J. Passion Play of Oberammergau . . 1436.11 

Noyes, Alfred. The enchanted island: and other poems . 1436.7 

Peabody, Josephine Preston. The piper 1436.5 

Quiller-Couch, A. T. Oxford book of English verse 1426. 18 

Swinburne, A. C. Poetical works 1426.19 

Taylor, Bayard. Poetical works 1426.17 



JUVENILE. 



Austin, Oscar Phelps. Uncle Sam's secrets: A story of 

national affairs for the youth of the nation . 1221 . 26 

Ellis, Katharine Ruth. Wide awake girls at College . . 1237 . 27 

Finnemore, John. India 1238.13 

Japan 1238 14 

Hodges, George. Garden of Eden: Stories from the first 

nine books of the Old Testament . . . 842 . 1 

Kelly, R. Talbot. Burma. (Peeps at many lands ) . 1238.12 

Egypt. (Peeps at many lands. ) . . . 1238.11 

Kingsley, Charles. The Heroes; or Greek fairy tales . 1231.23 

Kipling, Rudyard. Rewards and fairies . . . 1237.26 

Lagerlof, Selma. Christ legends 842.10 

Wonderful Adventures of Nils .... 842.11 

Lang, Andrew Editor. Tales of the Round Table . . 1221.24 

Lang, Mrs. Red book of heroes 842 . 3 

Long, William J. Wood folk at school 1231.21 

McDonald, Etta Blaisdell and Dalrymple, J. Kathleen in 

Ireland. (Little people everywhere ) . . 842.7 

Manuel in Mexico 842 . 5 

Rafael in Italy ....... 842.6 

Ume San in Japan 842 . 4 

Marshall, H. E. Child's English literature .... 1221.22 

Monroe, Mrs. Lewis B. Story of our country . . . 1231 . 22 

Osazi, Theodora. Warriors of old Japan; and other stories 1216. 15 

Ray, Anna Chapin. Sidney; Her Senior year .... 834.23 
Renninger, Elizabeth D. Story of Rustem; and other 

Persian hero tales 1221.23 

Richards, Laura E. Florence Nightingale; the angel of the 

Crimea 842.8 

Rogers, Julia Ellen. Trees every child should know . . 842.13 

Schwartz, Julia Augusta. Wonderful little lives. . . 842 . 9 
Selous, Edmund. Romance of the animal world; interesting 
descriptions of the strange and curious in 

natural history 842 . 2, 

Stimson, F. J. (pseud.) King Noanett 1231.23 



129 

Tappan, Eva March. Old ballards in prose . . 1238.15 

Weikel, Anna Hamlin. Betty Baird's golden year . . 842 . 12 

Wells, Carolyn. Rainy day diversions 1221 . 25 

Yale, Elsie Duncan. When mother lets us give a party . 1231 .20 



PERIODICALS. REFERENCE. PAMPHLETS. 

Atlantic Monthly Vols. 99, 100 

Century illustrated monthly Magazine Vols. 77, 78 

Harper's monthly Vols. 118, 119 

Massachusetts. Seventy-third annual report of the Board 

of Education, Jan., 1910 *Ref. R. R. 

Report of the Commission on the cost of living, 

1910 *Ref. 

Massachusetts. Agriculture. Small fruits and berries. 

Boston, 1910. (Bulletin, No. 4. ) . . *Pan. B. 6m 

Fort Jefferson, and its Commander , *Pan. B. 6.9m 

Woods, Henry Ernest. Woods family of Groton . . *Pan. B. 6.12m 

♦Indicates the book was a gift. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1910 




132 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

EDWARD E. BRADLEY, Chairman, Term expiresl912 
EDWARD R. FARRAR, Secretary, " " 1913 

HENRY E. WARNER, " H 1911 

Superintendent of Schools. 
C. S. LYMAN. 

Supervisor of Drawing and Manual Training. 
WALTER F. BRACKET. 

Supervisor of Cooking and Sewing. 
MRS. IRVING SMITH. 

Supervisor of Music. 
MRS. HARRIET J. BARTLETT. 

Teachers. 
Lincoln Grammar Grades VII-VIII. 
CARRIE B. CHAPIN. 

Lincoln Grammar Grades V-VI. 
LILLIAN M. SHAW. 

Lincoln Primary Grades III-IV. 
ALICE M. CLIFFORD. 

Lincoln Primary Grades I-II. 
HATTIE B. HEATH. 

South Primary Grades I-II-III. 
GERTRUDE BROOKS. 

Truant Officer. 
JAMES T. LAIRD. 

Janitors. 

Lincoln. 

EDWARD BANNON. 

South. 
EDMUND R. DAVIS. 



133 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Year 1910-1911. 

We submit herewith the reports of the Superintendent 
and the School Physician, and the usual tables of statis- 
tics. 

The schools have had a prosperous year. We believe 
that the work of the teachers in every department is 
being carried on in a faithful and successful way. We 
regret the necessity of making a change of teachers in 
two school rooms in the middle of the year, especially 
as we should have been glad to retain much longer the 
teachers we lost. We count as a very valuable thing the 
cumulative influence of a good teacher. In order to 
retain in the service of the Town those teachers who 
approve themselves to be such, we believe that it would 
be the part of wisdom for the Town to enable us to pay 
somewhat larger salaries than we are now able to do. 
We believe that there is no expenditure of money by 
which a quicker and a more far-reaching, return is made 
to the community than in this way. 

EDWARD E. BRADLEY, 
EDWARD R. FARRAR, 
HENRY E. WARNER, 

School Committee. 



134 



Superintendent's Report. 

To the School Committee of the Town of Lincoln: — 

In presenting my fourth annual report, I am glad to 
say that we have had a prosperous year and have made 
gains along several lines. 

Courses of Study. 

We have spent so much time and effort trying to im- 
prove the work of the primary grades, that the pupils are 
entering the grammar grades better prepared than ever 
before. With the new methods it takes less time to 
teach the little folks to read, yet their reading is better 
and more expressive, and their power to gain new words 
is greatly increased. Beautiful gems of literature have 
been memorized and a goodly number of children's 
songs thoroughly learned. These songs and poems not 
only add much happiness to the children's school days, 
but will be a source of great pleasure to them in the 
future. At the same time their memories and voices 
are being well trained. Many stories from literature, 
history and geography are read and told, thus preparing 
the way for a later study of these subjects. The children 
learn enough from these stories to make the grammar 
school work fuller and better. From their nature lessons 
and their garden work they learn better to appreciate 
nature's work, to have more sympathy for animals, and 
to observe and understand the simpler phenomena and 
laws of nature. In arithmetic we try to have the primary 
children master the four fundamental processes with 



135 

some very simple work in small fractions, little problems 
in every day weights and measures, and buying and sell- 
ing problems which come naturally within their reach. 
With this foundatuon the grammar grades receive the 
children and can work them along rapidly and well. 

Of course we always have throughout the schools some 
pupils who are a great and trying problem to each 
teacher. For one cause or another these children fail 
to understand the work or to get the full amount pre- 
scribed. But as they pass along from grade to grade 
they are absorbing what they are capable of and are 
often obtaining a better education than their recitations 
would indicate. They are certainly receiving a training 
in regularity and punctuality, and gaining habits of 
attention and of regular application to work. 

There are children who are not scholarly and never will 
be; their minds do not grasp the abstract; they need 
the concrete; they express themselves in action. Al- 
though such children will never become deep thinkers, 
many of them are capable of developing into useful men 
and women and valuable citizens. In the past the 
schools have done very little for such children; much 
that was taught they could not grasp; they had no 
interest in the rules of grammar and the abstract prob- 
lems in mathematics; much of the school work simply 
chaffed them. The old courses of study had little for 
them, even the "three R's", they learned laboriously and 
after much prodding from teacher and parents. 

In recent years we have realized that our public 
schools owed much to these children and that our courses 
of study must be broadened and developed along lines 
that would appeal to them and meet their needs. Home 
and community conditions have so changed, that children 
of to-day get' very little training of the kind that they 
need for modern life outside the school. The school 
curriculum, then, must be so changed as to supply the 



136 

needs of these children, at the same time many others 
who are more scholarly will benefit by these larger op- 
portunities, and the community in years to come will 
reap a large harvest in better workers and more intelli- 
gent citizens. 

The new State Board of Education and its Commis- 
sioners are working persistently for these improvements. 
During the past year, under the authority of the Legis- 
lature, they have been investigating agricultural edu- 
cation, and making plans for an increased amount of 
industrial training in the public schools. The Com- 
missioners are also having conferences with the town 
superintendents to get in touch with rural conditions, 
and they intend later to issue a course of study for rural 
schools. In the next few years much new legislation 
along educational lines may be looked for, and our 
schools must be ready to take up these requirements. 

In Lincoln we have anticipated some of these changes 
and have worked towards these results, so that when the 
new laws are put in force, we shall find it easy to adapt 
our schools to the new conditions. At the same time 
we have not and shall not give up the best in the tra- 
ditional courses. 

The Manuel Work. 

The boys and girls of the fourth grades have worked 
with raffia and reed, weaving mats and baskets. The 
boys of the fifth and sixth grades have continued this 
work and woven carpet mats and hammocks, caned chairs, 
and have done some simple forms of woodwork. 

Mr. Brackett says: 

" There has been a very marked improvement in the 
sixth grade, the work being accurate, neat and with 
good idea of form expressed. This seems to be the effect 
of the training below that grade. The seventh and 



137 

eighth grades have done considerable practical work this 
year. They have made and put up football goals, 
backstop for baseball, and have nearly completed and 
will put up goals for basket ball, and see-saws for the 
smaller children. They also have under construction a 
large, solid table for the cooking room and a kindergarten 
table for the lowest grade. " 

The older boys have been much interested in construct^ 
ing the playground apparatus and have worked vigorous- 
ly and well. 

It has been Mr. Brackett's aim to make the drawing 
aid the manual training and the sewing. Some pupils 
have made a number of useful articles and decorated 
them with their own designs. 

The girls have continued their sewing, learning the 
various stitches and making a number of useful articles of 
clothing. The older pupils have learned to run the 
sewing machines. I think the girls have made the greatest 
advancement in cooking. 

Mrs. Smith seems especially adapted to the teaching 
of this subject. The fifth grade girls have cooked a 
number of simple dishes, such as cocoa, oatmeal and 
other cereals, baked and boiled potatoes, milk toast, 
crisped crackers, scrambled eggs, baked corn, stewed 
tomatoes, and fried bacon. The highest class, consisting 
of grades VII and VIII, have cooked most of the above 
dishes and many others, including creamed salt fish, 
baked halibut, fishballs, potato balls, beef hash, baked 
spaghetti, mince meat and apple pie. They have made 
both white and brown bread, Indian gems and graham 
muffins. They preserved and sold a number of cans of 
pears and tomatoes. The day before Thanksgiving they 
prepared and ate a savory dinner of roast chicken, 
potatoes, squash, turnip, cranberry sauce and mince pie. 

Mrs. Smith writes me: 

"Pupils are taught to use the products of the farm in 



138 

various wholesome ways and to can fruits. We should 
like for school use some of the surplus or unsaleable 
fruits and vegetables from Lincoln farms. Parents are 
urged to encourage the girls to cook at home, otherwise 
much of the benefit of the lessons is lost/' 

As I watch the boys and girls at work in these practical 
departments, I feel sure they are gaining much valuable 
training and useful knowledge and forming good habits. 

Playgrounds. 

Lincoln is fortunate in having large, well laid out 
grounds suitable for free and varied plays. When the 
apparatus, which Mr. Brackett and the boys have 
planned and made, is all set up, the children will enjoy 
healthy, vigorous games. This department of our 
schools is far more important than most people realize, 
for play occupies a large place in the development of 
every child. The following quotations from men who 
have studied the problem indicate the educational value 
of play: 

" Playing, the child grows character * * there- 
fore there is nothing in the world range of schooling that 
is as educational." 

— Jacob Riis. 

"The universal impulse to play is a divinely ordered 
thing. If God gives the instinct, man ought to provide 
the playground." — Josiah Strong. 

"The children begin their education when they begin 
to play; for play not only affords an outlet for their 
energy, and so supplies one great means of growth and 
training, but places them in social relation with their 
mates and in conscious contact with the world about 
them. The old games that have been played by gen- 
erations of children not only precede the training of the 



139 

school and supplement it, but accomplish some results 
in the nature of the child which are beyond the reach of 
the school." — Hamilton Wright Mabie. 

"The playgroung proves to be an economy to the city 
in that it lessens crime among children." 

— Judge Ben B. Lindsay. 



Garden Work. 

Several classes at the Lincoln School made gardens on 
the school grounds during the spring term and grew 
flowers and a few early vegetables. The children enjoy 
working in these gardens and the plants grew well during 
term time. 

Last spring we received from Professor Hart of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College a large quantity of 
potatoes and corn to be given to the pupils and leaflets 
also, which gave minute instruction about planting and 
caring for both. 

Professor Hart had formed potato and corn clubs all 
over the state. Our children were glad to join these 
clubs, and were especially successful in growing potatoes. 
In September we had an exhibit of the products at the 
school house, and I gave several prizes to those who had 
the best collections. William C. Peirce, Jr., of Grade 
VII stated on his card, "I received two pounds of seed 
potatoes and got from them 102 pounds of potatoes." 
Some of these potatoes were baked by the cooking class 
and found to be mealy and palatable. The pupils also 
grew in their home gardens other kinds of vegetables 
and flowers, some of the former were used in the cooking 
department. 

We believe this home garden work is of great value to 
the children. We hope it will stimulate a love for flow- 
ers and plants and a desire to grow better and more 



140 

perfect ones each year. They will gain a knowledge of 
the habits and needs of plants and what enemies to 
guard against which will be of great value to them if they 
ever own and cultivate land of their own. 

Health of School hildren. 

"There is a physical basis of citizenship, as there is a 
physical basis of life. * * * Given the sound body, 
we have nowadays small fear for a sound mind. * * * 
If mental dullness be due to imperfect ears, the remedy 
lies in medical treatment of those organs, not in education 
of the brain. If lack of initiative or energy proceeds 
from defective aeration of the blood due to adenoids 
blocking the air tides in the windpipe, then the remedy 
lies not in better teaching but in a simple surgical opera- 
tion." —Prof. W. T. Sedgewick. 

The truth of such statements is strongly influencing 
teachers and school officials, and great efforts are being 
made throughout the country to so improve the health 
of the children that they can get the full benefit of the 
school instruction and develop into wiser and more 
efficient citizens. We are improving the sanitary con- 
ditions of buildings, and endeavoring to guard and im- 
prove the children's health in every way within our 
power. 

The Lincoln School is now supplied with drinking 
fountains, and the common drinking cup has been abol- 
ished. 

Dr. Wood carefully examines each pupil at least once a 
year, gives advice about caring for the body and sends 
cards home, which inform the parents of physical de- 
fects which need immediate attention. He has advised 
many pupils to go to the dentist and have their teeth 
attended to. He has talked with the older children 
about taking good positions while sitting and standing. 



141 

New books on physiology and hygiene of a very practi- 
cal nature have been placed in the school. These are 
read and studied during the winter months. We try 
to make the lessons so practical that the pupils will form 
more healthful habits themselves and gradually extend 
the influence of this education to their homes and so 
render them more sanitary. 

If parents could only realize to what extent physical 
defects may retard the child's progress, they would do all 
in their power to provide their children with healthy 
bodies. 

The Annual Report of the City Superintendent of 
Schools, New York City, 1909, refers to the study of 
7,608 school children as follows: — 

"Number of Years Necessary for Defective and Non- 
Defective Children to Complete the Eight Grades: 

Kinds of Defects Time for Eight Grades. 

No defects 8 years 

Defective vision 8 years 

Defective teeth. . .• 8.5 years 

Defective breathing 8.6 years 

Hypertrophied tonsils 8.7 years 

Adenoids 9.1 years 

Enlarged glands 9.2 years 

If these figures are substantially significant for all of 
New York City school children, their educational and 
econonic import is great. According to the data, the 
child with seriously defective teeth requires half a year 
more than a non-defective child to complete the eight 
grades. About one-half of the children have seriously 
defective teeth. The handicap imposed by defective 
breathing means six-tenths of a year. About one child 
in seven has defective breathing. The child with hyper- 
trophied tonsils takes about seven-tenths of a year more 
than he should. About one child in every four has hy- 



142 

pertrophied tonsils. The extra time required by the 
child with adenoids is about one and one-tenth years. 
About one child in eight has adenoids. The pupil with 
enlarged glands requires one and two tenths years extra. 
Nearly half of the children have enlarged glands." 

On January 18th the fire alarm at the Lincoln School 
was rung from the basement. The children passed out 
of the front door quickly and orderly, the last one getting 
out in 40 seconds after the alarm sounded. They ran 
around the building, entered the basement doors and 
were in their seats again inside of three minutes. There 
need be no fear of loss of life in case of fire in that building. 

I have just placed a copy of Cabot's Ethics for Child- 
dren on each teacher's desk, and feel sure this book will 
be a great aid in teaching morals and manners. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Committee for their 
continued confidence in our work, and the teachers for 
their constant efforts to train the children for good 
citizenship. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. S. LYMAN, 
Superintendent of Schools, 



143 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL PHYSICIAN. 

In a brief report on the physical welfare of the school 
children, it is a pleasure to note the good hygenic con- 
ditions under which the work is done and the generally 
fine health of the children themselves. There has been 
no outbreak of infectious disease, a few cases of whooping 
cough being the nearest approach to it. 

The annual examination of all the children shows 148 
examined; 80 with defective teeth, 36 with enlarged 
tonsils and adenoids, 22 with pediculosis and 23 with 
faulty posture. 

While these findings correspond pretty closely with 
those of other years and places they do not express the 
great improvement that has taken place. The first in- 
spection showed that these conditions prevailed through- 
out the schools. Now the upper grades are almost free 
from defective teeth and large tonsils. Thanks to the 
intelligent response of parent and pupil these defects 
have been remedied. In the entering and lower grades 
this does not hold true and here plenty of recruits are 
found to keep the number up to the usual percentage. 

In this connection it is worthy of note that arrange- 
ments have been completed for the gratuitious care of 
any child who is unable to meet the expense of private 
treatment. 

In the upper grades, however, are found certain de- 
fects which may be characterized as developmental. 
These are put down under the heading of posture and are 
found in the stooping shoulders, flat chest, curved spine, 
prominent hip, etc. The examination, a superficial one, 
discovered a goodly number, induced no doubt by the 



144 

tendency of children to do the same thing in the same 
way, always to stand on the same foot, to lean on the 
same elbow, to carry weights on the same arm, to sit and 
stand in a stooping position. All these are bad habits, 
influenced by several factors it may be, but if persisted 
in while the child is growing and the bones plastic may 
assume a permanent shape. Fortunately in most cases 
the all round activity and exercise is sufficient to correct 
this. Nevertheless there are several who need corrective 
exercise. Much has been done by suggestion and advice. 
Still more can be accomplished by intelligent instruction 
and supervision of the exercise and play of the children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. WOOD, 

School Physician. 



145 
ROLL OF HONOR. 

The following pupils have been neither absent nor 
tardy for the time designated: — 

For One Year. 

Olen A. Jensen. Olgar Jensen. 

Redmond Hartwell. Ethel Rocks. 

Raymond Langille. 

For Two Terms. 

Emma Flemming. Gertrude O. Morrison. 

Grace L. Bamforth. Sara Clark. 

Albert Coffee. Edna Weatherbee. 

Majorie Doherty. Belva Gallant. 

For One Term. 

Chas. N. Bamforth. Margaret Collins. 

Irving Flemming. Fred. A. Rocks. 

M. Elizabeth Weir. Mary Diamond. 

Bertha Bowles. William Bowles. 

Edward Boyce. Evelyn Cousins, 

Alice Crowley. Doris Farrar. 

Thomas Giles. Margaret Hutton. 

James Plumer. Robert Wier. 

Howard Bamforth. Warren Rice. 

Elizabeth Connors. Leonard Crowley. 

Joseph Eaton. Waldo Foley. 

Harold Moulton. Emily Robus. 

Frank Ryan. Grace Thomas. 

Francis Corrigan. Marie Connors. 

Gladys Weatherbee. Richard Nelson. 
Rothwell MacRae. 

For One Term. 
Elizabeth Hutton. Reynold Bowles. 

Andrew Weir. William Weir. 



146 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 

Winter term begins January 2, 1911, ends March 24; 
twelve weeks. 

Spring term begins April 3, ends June 16; eleven weeks. 

Fall term begins September 5, ends December 15; fifteen 
weeks. 

Winter term begins January 1, 1912, ends March 22; 
twelve weeks. 

Spring term begins April 1, ends June 14; eleven weeks. 

Recess from Wednesday before Thanksgiving to Monday 
following. 

Holidays: Washington's Birthday, Patriot's Day, Mem- 
orial Day, Columbus Day. 

Length of school year, 38 weeks. 



147 



STATISTICS FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1909-10. 



Number of children in Town, September, 1910, 
between 5 and 15 years: — boys, 82; girls, 78: 

total . 

Number of children in Town, September, 1909 
Number of children in Town, September, 1910 

between 7 and 14 years: — boys, 71; girls, 64 

total 

Enrollment for the year, ending June, 1910 
Number between 5 and 15 years of age 
Number over 15 years of age 
Number between 7 and 14 years of age 
Number attending Concord High School 
Number attending Lexington and Weston 

Schools 

Number of regular teachers employed . 
Number of special teachers employed . 
Number of teachers who have graduated 

normal schools .... 

From Training School .... 
Illiterate minors in Town over 14 years of age 
Total number registered in Lincoln schools during 

the year ending June, 1910 . 
Number of pupils sent to High School from Lincoln 
Total number receiving instruction at Town 

expense 



High 



from 



160 
158 



135 
141 
136 
5 
117 
18 

2 
5 
3 

5 

1 


151 

20 

171 



148 





rH 

CO 


i> i 

CO 


CO 1 
OS 


rH 

00 


o 

o 


o • 


•ssauTpjBx 


1> 


00 


Tin 

CO 


CO 
1—1 


00 


CO 
OS 


•83b jo sjb9a" gx 
j9ao sijdnj 


iO 


o 


O 


o 


o 


to 


•oSb jo sivaA. f\ pan i 
U39A\^8q sjidnj 


o 


CO 
CO 


CO 


as 


1—1 


1> 


•93i3 j^sib9a* gx P^b g 
u99A\}9q sitdnj 




CO 


CO 


CM 
CM 




CO 
CO 
1—i 


•9out?pu9Wy 
jo ^ugoigj 




OS 


oo 
o 

05 


00 

cs 

00 


CO 

rH 

as 


Os 


•90nBpU8^Y 
93BJ9Ay 


CO 


CO 
OS 


00 


CO 


00 
00 

i— i 


o 

rH 

rH 


•diqsi9qui9j\[ 

93BJ9AV 


CO 


CO 


CO 
CO 


00 
1— 1 


CO 

o 


CO 
CM 


•81ITQ — ^ugniiiojng 


IC 


<N 


oo 


o 


<M 


CO 


•SA"og — ;n9mnoiug; 


T— I 


<M 


CO 


<M 


O 


1> 


•^jodg'jj 9^g 
ioj ^U9nqiojug 


OS 


CO 


CO 


cq 

CM 




* 


CO 
O 

o 
«8 


Lincoln Grammar 
Grades VII-VIII Carrie B„ Chapin 


£ g 

^§ 

l-H 

> 
1 

> 
O 

<3 

a 


pq 

Q 

o 

'3 
a 

> 
I— i 

i 

HH 
HH 
HH 

CO 
CD 

13 

c3 

a 


rd 

-!-=> 

a3 

o 

w 

• i-H 
+3 

n 

HH 

HH 

1 

1— 1 

CO 
<X> 

a 


South Primary. 
Grades I-II-III Stella V. Sanborn 


*c3 

O 



149 



WARRANT. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Monday, 
March sixth, at 1 o'clock P.M., to act on the following 
articles, viz.: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a moderator. 

ART. 2. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

ART. 3. To choose all necessary Town Officers, Com- 
mittees, Commissioners and Trustees for the ensuing 
year. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town, and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To give in their votes by ballot in answer to 
the question: " Shall licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in this Town?" The check list shall 
be used as provided by Section 5, Chapter 100 of the 
Public Statutes. 



150 

ART. 6. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow dur- 
ing the municipal year, beginning February first, 1910, in 
anticipation of the collection of taxes of said year, such 
sums of money as may be necessary for the Current ex- 
penses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax levy 
for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in payment 
thereof, payable in one year from the dates thereof. All 
debts incurred under authority of this vote shall be paid 
from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3 of Article 9 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will appoint a committee 
to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors in the 
Town, and appropriate money for the same. 

ART. 11. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to the old schoolhouse in the center of the Town. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will continue the Special 
Committee appointed at the Special Town Meeting of 
September, 1908, to act in an advisory capacity to the 
Tree Warden, or take any other action in the matter. 

ART. 13. To see what action, if any, the Town will 
take with reference to the order of the County Commis- 
sioners on "Lee's Bridge." 



151 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from the corner near L. E. Brooks along the Cam- 
bridge Turnpike to a point opposite the house of Eugene 
Jose, and make appropriation for the same. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from its present terminus opposite the place formerly 
known as the Mayer's Farm to a point opposite the 
house of David Farquhar and make an appropriation for 
the same. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches or some other public place, seven days 
at least before the day appointed for such meeting, and to 
make seasonable return thereof with your doings thereon, 
to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 



Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-fourth day of February, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred an 
eleven. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. LEE TODD, 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



153 



By-Laws of tie Town of Lincoln. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Middlesex, ss. 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 
of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897, 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to wit:— 

"ARTICLE I. 
Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on 
the first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving a 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 
*own, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or at- 
tached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 



154 

ARTICLE II. 
Finances. 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence with the 
first day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the ac- 
count to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall be 
sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge -him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month, 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them th 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer is 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 
approve in writing all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such appropriation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to whom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 



155 

shall be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
sums by law payable from th^ treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds. - < 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section 
Such drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be trans 
mitted by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accom- 
panied by the approved bills or other documents for the 
settlement of which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. G. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap 
/roved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes scrip, and other 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. No draft shall be drawn by tne selectmen un- 
less there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except 
for sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, 
final judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the 
town and interest thereon, and money payable to the com 
missioners of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shal' 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
«* countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they slmM 
incur no further expenditure, except in cases when- - 
expenditure may be required by law; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the in- 



156 

terval between the thirty-first day of January in each year 
and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
in order to meet the liabilities of their several dpartments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditure and liability incurred for any pur- 
pose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount appro- 
priated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise 
vote, no extension of water pipes shall be made unless be- 
fore the work of construction is begun one or more of the 
persons whom it is proposed to supply with water by means 
of such extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with 
sureties satisfactory to the water commissioners, condi- 
tioned to pay to the town for five years next following the 
completion of such extension and the letting of water into 
the same, a sum sufficient, together with the net annual in 
come from such extension, to amount annually to five per 
centum of the total cost thereof. 



ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be: a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct: in 1754 as a Town;" in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln; 
in saltire two shepherd's crooks; the device thereof being as 
follows: 



157 

Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, 
given or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be 
sealed with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town 
by a majority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a boo] 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and othei 
instruments to which the town is a party except such in- 
struments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of 
Deeds; and it shall be the duty of any board or officer exe 
cuting or receiving such written contract, or other instru- 
ment, to deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for 
the purpose of record. It shall be the duty of the town 
clerk to see that all conveyances of real estate to the town 
are properly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of c~L- town re- 
ports, reports of all committees chosen by the tow 7- and all 
original documents relating to the affairs of the tow. which 
may come into his possession. 

ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Section 1. Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



158 
ARTICLE VI. 

Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds §200.00. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may be expedient to do so. 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the pro- 
tection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose, a committee on claims, such committee 
shall have and exercise exclusively all the powers and 
duties conferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding 
sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the town seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town 
officers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devises, bequests and donations to the town during the 



159 

preceding year; a list of all laws of the commonwealth ac- 
cepted bj the town during the year; all by-laws adopted by 
the town since the preceding annual report; copies of the 
laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance of 
any highway or townway within the limits of the town dur- 
ing the preceding year; and a statement of all outstanding 
bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the payment 
of money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 
child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the 
town having no lawful occupation or business, not attend- 
ing school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children 
as persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations 
of the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be com- 
mitted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelms- 
ford, Mass., or to any other place provided by the town 
within its limits, for confinement, instruction, and disci- 
pline. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 



160 

after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having 
been requested by the owner or any occupant of the 
premises or by any constable or police officer to remove 
therefrom. 

Sect. 4. No person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. No person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or 
way, without proper authority to do so. 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
offense, a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, ap- 
proved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
of record. I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



161 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers, 1910-1911 - . 3-5 

Proceedings of Town Meetings, 1910-1911 6-28 

Town Clerk's Report 29-32 

Recommendations for Appropriations 33-34 

Selectmen's Report 33-50 

Auditor's Report 57 

Expenditures for the year . 58-71 

Report of Assessors 84-100 

Report of Town Treasurer . . . . 1 . . . 72 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund 73 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds .... 74-79 

Report of Treasurer Geo. F. Bemis Lecture Fund . . . 80-81 

Report of Treasurer Cemetery Commissioners .... 82 

Report of Water Commissioners 101-109 

Report of Tree Warden 110-117 

Report of Board of Health 83 

Report of Supt. of Streets 54-55 

Report of Inspector of Animals 51 

Report of Fire Engineers 52-53 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library . . . . 118 

Library Statistics • . . 120 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 119 

Report of Librarian 121 

List of Accessions to Library 122-129 

School Reports 131-148 

Report of School Committee 133 

School Calendar and Statistics 146-147 

Roll of Honor 145 

Tabular Statement 148 

Warrant, 1911 149-151 

By-Laws of the Town 153-160 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From February 1, 1911, to February 1, 1912 

ALSO THE 

Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THET YEAR 'I9l1-l3l2 




BOSTON:. 
GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTER; 

394 Atlantic Avenue. > 
1912 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From February 1, 1911> to February 1, 1912 



ALSO THE 



Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THE YEAR 1911-1912 



BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS. 

394 Atlantic Avenue. 

1912 



TOWN OFFICERS, 191U1912. 



Toivn Clerk. 
George L. Chapin. 

Selectmen and Overseers of Poor. 

Charles S. Smith, Charles Lee Todd, 

Robert D. Donaldson. 



Board of Health. 



R. D. Donaldson 
Martin M. Welch 
Edwards W. Herman 



Term expires 1912 

1913 
« tt 1914 



Charles S. Wheeler 
William C. Peirce 
William H. Sherman 



Assessors. 



Term expires 1912 

" " 1913 

" 1914 



Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
Charles S. Wheeler. 

Auditor. 
James W. Lennon. 

Constables. 

James T. Laird, Winslow A. Eaton, 

George E. Cunningham. 



Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

Charles S. Smith .... 

C. Lee Todd ..... 
Julius E. Eveleth .... 



Term expires 1912 

" " 1913 

u u 1914 



Tree Warden. 
John J. Kelliher. 

Committee on Claims. 

Moorfield Storey, Julius E. Eveleth. 

Charles S. Wheeler. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

George Flint '. . . . Term expires 1912 

C. Lee Todd .... " u 1913 

Julius E. Eveleth * u " 1914 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 
Charles S. Wheeler, Herbert E. Barnes. 

Trustees oj Lincoln Library. 

Gharles F. Adams, John F. Farrar, 

Charles Lee Todd, 
Charles S. Smith, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
Rev. Edward E. Bradley, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 

Registrars. 

Charles S. Smith, Robert D. Donaldson, 

C. Lee Todd, George L. Chapin. 

School Committee. 

Rev. Edward E. Bradley . . . Term expires 1912 

Edward R. Farrar .... " " 1913 

Henry E. Warner .... " "1914 

Water Commissioners. 

Stephen H. Blodgett .... Term expires 1912 

Joseph S. Hart " " 1913 

George L. Chapin .... " " 1914 

Charles S. Smith, Chairman Selectmen, ex-officio. 
Charles S. Wheeler, Treasurer, ex-officio. 



Field Drivers. 



Martin Corrigan, 



Chas. F. Foreman. 



John F. Farrar, 



Fence Viewers. 



Wm. H. Sherman. 



Surveyors of Lumber. 
Richard A. Shepard. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 



Samuel Farrar, 



Harold S. Cousins, 



John F. Farrar. 



Cemetery Commissioners. 



Edward F. Flint 
Herbert E. Barnes 
George L. Chapin 
Charles S. Smith 
Julius E. Eveleth 



Term expires 1912 
" " 1913 

u u 19U 

" " 1915 

" " 1916 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting, held March 6, 1911. 

WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Monday, 
March sixth, at 1 o'clock P.M., to act on the following 
articles, viz.: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a moderator. 

ART. 2. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

ART. 3. To choose all necessary Town Officers, Com- 
mittees, Commissioners and Trustees for the ensuing 
year. 

ART. 4. To appropriate" money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town, and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 



8 

ART. 5. To give in their votes by ballot in answer to 
the question: "Shall licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in this Town?" The check list shall 
be used as provided by Section 5, Chapter 100 of the 
Public Statutes. 

ART. 6. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow dur- 
ing the municipal year, beginning February first, 1910, in 
anticipation of the collection of taxes of said year, such 
sums of money as may be necessary for the Current ex- 
penses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax levy 
for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in payment 
thereof, payable in one year from the dates thereof. All 
debts incurred under authority of this vote shall be paid 
from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3 of Article 9 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will appoint a committee 
to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors in the 
Town, and appropriate money for the same. 

ART. 11. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to the old schoolhouse in the center of the Town. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will continue the Special 
Committee appointed at the Special Town Meeting of 



9 

September, 1908, to act in an advisory capacity to the 
Tree Warden, or take any other action in the matter. 

ART. 13. To see what action, if any, the Town will 
take with reference to the order of the County Commis- 
sioners on " Lee's Bridge/' 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from the corner near L. E. Brooks along the Cam- 
bridge Turnpike to a point opposite the house of Eugene 
Jose, and make appropriation for the same. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from its present terminus opposite the place formerly 
known as the Mayer's Farm to a point opposite the 
house of David Farquhar and make an appropriation for 
the same. Also to see if an extension of the water pipe 
shall be made to the house owned by the City of Cam- 
bridge, and appropriate money for the same. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches or some other public place, seven days 
at least before the day appointed for such meeting, and to 
make seasonable return thereof with your doings thereon, 
to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-fourth day of February, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
eleven. 

• CHARLES S. SMITH, 
C. L. TODD, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



10 

The return of this Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, Feb. 25, 1911. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each if the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was 
called to order by the Town Clerk, who read theWarrant 
and the return on the same. 

The following votes were then passed: 

ARTICLE 1. Chose Charles S. Wheeler, Moderator. 
(The check list being used. ) 

ART. 2. All of the printed reports in the Town Book 
were accepted, after some discussion. 

ART. 3. Voted and chose. 

Town Clerk. — George L. Chapin (sworn. ) 

Selectmen. — 

Charles S. Smith (sworn). 

C. Lee Todd (sworn). 

Robert D. Donaldson (sworn). 

Voted to omit choosing Overseers of the Poor. 

Board of Health.— 3 yrs. Edwards W. Herman, M.D. 

Assessor. — 3 years. William H. Sherman (sworn). 

School Committee. — 3 years. Henry E. Warner. 

Water Commissioner. — 3 years. George L. Chapin. 



11 

Field Drivers. — 

Martin Corrigan (sworn). 
Charles F. Foreman (sworn). 

Fence Viewers. — 

John F. Farrar (sworn). 
William H. Sherman (sworn). 

Surveyor of Lumber. — Richard A. Shepard. 

Town Treasurer. — Charles S. Wheeler (sworn). 

Voted, That the Town Treasurer be the Collector of 
Taxes for the ensuing year. 

Auditor. — James W. Lennon. 

Constables. — 

James T. Laird (sworn). 
Winslow A. Eaton (sworn). 
George E. Cunningham (sworn). 

Commissioner of Trust Funds, 3 years.— Julius E. 
Eveleth. 

Tree Warden.— John J. Kelliher. 

Trustee of Bemis Lectureship for Free Lectures, 3 

years. — Julius E. Eveleth. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. — 

Samuel Farrar (sworn). 
John F. Farrar (sworn). 
Harold S. Cousins. 

Cemetery Commissioner, 5 years. Julius E. Eveleth. 



12 
ART. 4. The following appropriations were made: 



9,000 . 


00 


500 


00 


6,500 


.00 


400 


.00 


500 


.00 


250.00 


300 


.00 


500 


00 


2,800 


.00 


48 


.00 


4,500 


.00 


1,500 


.00 


2,173 


37 


2,400 


00 



Schools 

Poor 

Roads and Bridges 
Library The Dog Tax and 

Interest 

Cemeteries .... 

Board of Health 

Tree Warden .... 

Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth 

State Aid .... 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

Payment of Water Bonds. ( To be taken 

from Water Works' Treasury ) . 
Sinking Fund. ( To be taken from Water 

Works' Treasury) 

Hydrant and other Public Water Service . 
Rebuilding of Lee's Bridge, provided the 

County Commisioners' Order be so 

amended that said bridge is built on 

present location 
Waltham Hospital 
Street Lamps .... 
Fire Department 

Payment of New Schoolhouse Bonds 
Extra for purchase of Schoolhouse Bonds . 
Special Appropriation for Water Works 

(Sinking Fund ) 

Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds . 
Suppression of Liquor Nuisance . 

Voted, That of the sums appropriated, the sum of 
$8,248 .91 be taken from money in the Treasury. 
Special appropriation for Library to pay 

for electric lighting ... 300.00 



2,500.00 
250.00 

1,211.10 
200.00 

3,000.00 

3,000.00 

2,200.00 

1,840.00 

200.00 



13 

ART. 5. Voted, That the Town Clerk cast one No 
Ballot for the Town. 

The polls were kept open one hour, the Ballot Box and 
Check List used. The counter on the Ballot Box 
showed one ballot cast, and upon opening the box, one 
No Ballot was found and the following result was de- 
clared as the vote. 

Yes, 0. No, 1. 

ART. 6. Voted, That the taxes be collected in the 
same way and manner as last year. 

ART. 7. Voted, That the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes be \\% of the amount of the list collected. 

ART. 8. Voted, unanimously. That the Treasurer 
be, and hereby is authorized, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow during the municipal year begin- 
ning Feb. 1, 1911, in anticipation of taxes, such sums of 
money as may be necessary for the current expenses of 
the Town, but not exceeding the total levy for said year, 
giving the notes of the Town therefor, payable within 
one year after the dating thereof, from the taxes of the 
present municipal year, and that the said notes be reg- 
istered with the First National Bank, Boston, Mass. 

ART. 9. Voted to choose a Committee in Claims. 
Moorfield Storey, Julius E. Eveleth, Charles S. Wheel- 
er, Committee on Claims. 

ART. 10. Voted, That the Selectmen be a committee 
to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors in 
the Town. 

ART. 11. The question was raised as to whether the 
Town owned all the land upon which the old school- 



14 

house stands. It was voted, That the whole matter be 
left to the Committee on Claims, to report at a future 
meeting. 

ART. 12. Voted, That the same Committee as last 
year be continued the present year. 

ART. 13. Voted to pass over the Article. 

ART. 14. Voted to extend the water pipe along the 
Concord Turnpike to a point opposite the house of 
Eugene Jose; provided, that before such extension is 
made, a bond is filed in accordance with the By Laws; 
and the sum of (SI, 200) Twelve Hundred Dollars is 
hereby appropriated for the same. 

ART. 15. Voted to extend the water pipe from op- 
posite the Mayer's place, so called, to a point opposite 
the house of David Farquhar, provided, that before such 
extension is made, a bond is filed with the Town Clerk, 
approved by the Water Commissioners, guaranteering 
(7%) seven percent, on the cost of construction; and 
the sum of Seven Hundred Twenty-five ($725.00) be 
appropriated for the same, to be taken from the Treasury, 
temporarily, pending an issue of bonds. 

ART. 16. Voted to extend the water pipe from a 
point opposite the Flynn estate to a point opposite the 
dwelling owned by the City of Cambridge, provided, that 
before such work is begun' a bond, approved by the Water 
Commissioners, be filed with the Town Clerk, guarantee- 
ing (7% ) seven per cent, on the cost of construction; and 
the sum of Eleven Hundred Fifty dollars ($1150.00) is 
hereby appropriated for the same, to be taken from the 
Town Treasury, temporarily, pending an issue of bonds. 

Voted to adjourn. 

Attest: GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



15 

Lincoln, April 10, 1911. John F. Farrar was this day 
sworn as Superintendent of Streets. 

By GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, April 21, 1911. Martin M. Welch was this 
day sworn as Inspector of Animals. 

By GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, April 21, 1911. Martin M. Welch was this 
day sworn as Inspector of Meats. 

By GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, May 5, 1911. John F. Farrar was this day 
sworn as Special Police. 

By GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



16 



List of Jurors for the year 191 1 as prepared by the 

Selectmen. 



Walter F. Baker, 
Wallace M. Brooks, 
J. Elliot Bryant, 
John T. Clark, 
Harold S. Cousins, 
Matthew H. Doherty. 
Edward R. Farrar, 
Herbert G. Farrar, 
Thomas L. Giles, 
William H. Harding, 
Mason P. Hunter, 
Eugene Jose, 
Roderick B. Laird, 
Charles E. Nelson, 
Edwin B. Rice, 
Daniel H. Sherman, 
William H. Sherman, 
T. Wilbur Smith, 
Howard Snelling, 
Martin M. Welch, 
Charles S. Wheeler, 
Hermon T. Wheeler, 
George Wilmot, 



South Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Waltham R.F.D. 

Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

Waltham R.F.D. 

Concord 

Lincoln 

Lexington R.F.D. 

South Lincoln R.F.D. 

South Lincoln R.F.D. 

South Lincoln 

Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

South Lincoln 

Lincoln. 

Lexington R.F.D. 

Lincoln 



CHARLES S. SMITH, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



Attest ; 



GEORGE L. 



CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



17 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held Aug. 26, 191 1. 

WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX. SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of The Town 
of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Saturday, 
August 26th, 1911, at 8 o'clock P.M. to act on the fol- 
lowing Articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To see if the Town will issue water bonds 
pursuant to the Act of 1907, Chap. 476, and reimbuse the 
treasury on account of money paid from the treasury 
pending an issue of bonds on account of payments for 
water construction purposes, or take any other action 
with reference to the matter. 

ART. 3. To see of the Town will accept the bequest 
of five hundred (500 ) dollars under the will of John H. 
Pierce, given under the following clause: 

"To the INHABITANTS OF LINCOLN I give and 
bequeath the sum of Five Hundred Dollars to be in- 



18 

vested by them in some savings bank and the income 
thereof expended for the care of the cemetery lot owned 
jointly by myself and my brother Samuel H. Pierce in 
the Lower Cemetery so called in said Lincoln." 

ART. 4. To see if the Town will accept the further 
bequest of one thousand (1,000) dollars under the will 
of John H. Pierce, given under the following clause: 

"I furthermore give and bequeath to the INHAB- 
ITANTS OF LINCOLN the sum of One Thousand 
dollars in money the same to be invested and the income 
thereof expended in augumenting the salaries of the 
Librarians of the Public Library in said Lincoln." 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches or some other public place, seven days 
at least before the day appointed for such meeting, and 
to make seasonable return thereof with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this seventeenth day of August, in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
eleven. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

Lincoln, August 19, 1911. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 



19 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Town Clerk, who read the Warrant, and 
the following votes were passed. 

ARTICLE 1. Voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. (The check list being used. ) 

ART. 2. Voted, unanimously, That by virtue and 
in pursuance of the Act of 1907, Chapter 476, the Town 
Treasurer be and he is hereby authorized to issue and sell 
the bonds of the Town to the aggregate sum of Six 
Thousand Dollars ($6,000) dated Sept. 1, 1911 and pay- 
able $500, thereof on the first of September in each of 
the years 1912 to 1923 inclusive, bearing interest at the 
rate of four per centum per annum, payable semi- 
annually; such bonds shall bear on their face the words 
"Lincoln Water Loan" : said bonds shall be signed by the 
Treasurer and countersigned by a majority of the Select- 
men. 

ART. 3. Voted, To accept the bequest of Five Hun- 
dred Dollars ($500) from the estate of John H. Pierce, 
in accordance with the terms of said bequest. 

ART. 4. Voted, To accept the bequest of One Thous- 
and Dollars ($1,000) from the estate of John H. Pierce 
in accordance with the terms of said bequest. 

Voted to adjourn. 

Attest : GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



20 



P oceedings of a Primary Meeting held Sept. 26, 191 1. 

WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in the 
election of State and County Officers to assemble at 
Bemis Hall, on Tuesday, September 26th, at seven o'clock 
P. M., to give in their votes for the nomination of persons 
for the following offices, viz.: Governor, Lieutenant- 
Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney- 
General, Councillor, Senator, Representative in the 
General Court, County Commissioner, Clerk of the Court, 
Registrar of Deeds, State Committee, Delegate to the 
State Convention ; also, f or*any other officers required by 
law to be nominated on this date ; also, for the election of 
Town Committees of the respective parties for the year 
1912. 

All officers are to be voted for at this meeting in accord- 
ance with the direct primaries law passed by the Legis- 
lature in 1911. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting an attested copy thereof in each of the Post 
Offices and one of the churches, or in some other public 



21 

place, seven days at least before the day appointed for 
said meeting, and to make seasonable return thereof 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this fifteenth day of September, in 
the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and eleven. 

C. S. SMITH, 
C. L. TODD, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return of the Warrant is as follows : — 

Lincoln, Sept. 18, 1911. 
I served this Warrant by posting an attested copy in 
each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad Station 
seven days before said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 



Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who read the 
Warrant and declared the polls open, James W. Lennon 
and J. Malcolm Eveleth having been previously sworn 
as Ballot Clerks and Thomas L. Giles as Teller. 

The counter on the ballot box showed 000. The 
polls were closed at nine o'clock. Upon opening the 
ballot box, the ballots were immediately separated, the 
Republican ballots being counted first and declaration 
made of the same as follows: 

Republican. Total vote 65. 



22 



GOVERNOR.— 

Louis A. Frothingham of Boston, 
Joseph Walker of Brookline, 
Norman H. White of Brookline, 
Blank. 

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR— 

Robert Luce of Somerville, 
Blank, 

SECRETARY.— 

Albert P. Lantry of Springfield, 
Russell A. Wood of Cambridge, 
Blank, 

TREASURER. 

Elmer A. Stevens of Somerville, 

Blank 

AUDITOR.— 

Herbert W. Burr of Boston, 
John E. White of Tisbury, 
Blank, 

ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 
James M. Swift of Fall River, 
Blank, 

COUNCILLOR, Sixth District— 

Herbert E. Fletcher of West ford, 
Blank, 

SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex Distict. 
Elwood A. Walker of Waltham, 
Blank, 



40 votes 



13 


a 


7 


a 


5 


a 


53 votes 


12 


a 


33 votes 


16 


a 


16 


n 


46 votes 


19 


(l 


19 votes 


28 


a 


18 


a 


49 


a 


16 


a 


44 ^ 


^otes 


21 


n 


50 \ 


r otes 


15 


a 



23 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 
Irving L. Hodgdon of Bedford, 
Immanuel Pfeiffer of Bedford, 
Waldo L. Stone of Sudbury, 
Blank, 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Middlesex.— 
Charles W. Atkins of Everett, 
Levi S. Gould of Melrose, 
Blank, 

REGISTER OF DEEDS, Middlesex Southern District- 
Edwin D. Childs of Newton, 52 votes 
Blank, 13 



1 


vote 


23 votes 


39 


a 


2 


a 


12 votes 


40 


u 


13 


a 



tl 



CLERK OF COURTS, Middlesex. 

William C. Dillingham of Maiden, 48 votes 

Blank, 17 



)) 



STATE COMMITTEE, Fifth Middlesex District— 

Daniel Howard Fletcher , 45 votes 

Blank, 20 " 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE CONVENTION.— 

Charles S. Smith, 10 votes 

Scattering, 8 " 

Blank, 47 " 

TOWN COMMMITTEE.— 

Henry E. Warner, 47 votes 

Charles S. Smith, 47 " 

Chester H. Sherman, 50 " 

Blank, 13 " 

The Democratic ballots were then counted and de- 
clared as follows: — 
Total vote, 21. 



24 



GOVERNOR.- 



Eugene N. Foss of Boston, 
Blank, 


19 votes 
2 " 


LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 
Blank, 


16 votes 
5 " 


SECRETARY.— 

Frank J. Donaghue of Boston, 
Edward 0. Skelton of Boston, 
Blank, 


11 votes 
5 " 
5 " 


TREASURER.— 

Augustus L. Thorndike of Brewster, 
Blank, 


16 votes 
5 " 


AUDITOR.— 

Charles B. Strecker of Brookline, 
Blank, 


16 votes 

5 " 


ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 

George W. Anderson, of Boston 
Joseph J. Leonard of Boston. 
Blank, 


9 votes 
8 " 
4 " 


COUNCILLOR.— 

Blank, 


21 votes 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 

Warren Langmaid Bishop of Wayland, 14 votes 

Blank, 7 " 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.— 
• Charles J. Barton of Melrose, 15 votes 

Blank, 6 " 



25 

REGISTER OF DEEDS, Middlesex Southern District— 
Charles Lee Shea of Somerville, 15 votes 

Blank, 6 " 

CLERK OF COURT, Middelsex.— 

Thomas F. Kearns of Waltham, 15 votes 

Blank, 6 " 

STATE COMMITTEE, Fifth Middlesex District— 
Bernard W. Stanley of Waltham, 14 votes 

Blank, 7 " 

DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.— 



Anthony J. Doherty of Lincoln, 


18 votes 


Blank, 


3 " 


TOWN COMMITTEE. - 




Martin M. Welch, 


17 votes 


Anthony J. Doherty, 


18 " 


C. Lee Todd, 


17 " 


Patrick F. Corrigan, 


14 " 


Wm. H. Costello, 


1 vote 


Blank, 


3 votes 



Voted to adjourn. 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



26 



Proceedings of the State Election, held Nov. 7, 191 1. 

WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in the 
election of State and County Officers, to assemble at 
Bemis Hall, on Tuesday, November 7th, at seven o'clock 
in the forenoon, to give in the votes for the following 
officers, viz. : Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Secretary, 
Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney General, Councillor, Sena- 
tor, Representative in the General Court, County Com- 
missioner, Clerk of Courts, Register of Deeds; and any 
other officers required by law to be chosen in the month 
of November of the current year; also, to vote on an 
amendment to the Constitution authorizing the use of 
Voting Machines at all elections, (Chapter 75, Resolves 
of 1911 ) ; also, to vote on an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion increasing the power of the Legislature to authorize 
the taking of land and property for highways or streets, 
(Chapter 91, Resolves of 1901); also, to vote on the 
acceptance of Chapter 634, Acts of 1911, entitled "An 
Act to authorize the counties of the Commonwealth to 
establish retirement systems for their employees." 



27 

All officers enumerated above are to be designated and 
voted for on one ballot, the polls to be opened at seven 
o'clock A.M., and may be closed at four o'clock P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by post- 
ing an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices 
and one of the churches, or in some other public place, 
seven days at least before the day appointed for said 
meeting, and to make seasonable return thereof with your 
doings thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this thirtieth day of October, in the 
year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and eleven. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return of the Warrant is as follows: — 

Lincoln, Oct. 30, 1911. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order at seven o'clock by the Chairman of the Board 
of Selectmen, who read the Warrant, and after admin- 
istering the oath to Thomas L. Giles as Teller, James W. 
Lennon as Ballot Clerk, J. Malcolm Eveleth as Teller, 
Herbert G. Farrar as Ballot Clerk declared the polls 

opened, the counter on the Ballot Box reading 000- 



28 



Fifty ballots were taken from the box at 12.15 P.M., 
and fifty more at 3.15 P.M. Each time the ballots were 
sealed immediately after counting. The polls closed at 
sunset, the counter on the ballot box reading 180. 

One hundred and eighty ballots were cast with the 
following result. 

GOVERNOR.— 

James F. Carey of Haverhill, 
Eugene N. Foss, of Boston, Democratic 
Eugene N. Foss of Boston, Democratic- 
Progressive, 
Louis A. Frothingham of Boston, 
Frank N. Rand of Haverhill, 
Blank, 

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Walter S. Hutchins of Greenfield, 
Robert Luce of Somerville, 
William G. Merrill of Maiden, 
Patrick Mulligan of Boston, 
David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 
Blank, 

SECRETARY.— 

Frank J. Donahue of Boston, 
Alfred H. Evans of Northampton, 
Rose Fenner of Worcester, 
Albert P. Lantry of Springfield, 
Blank, 

TREASURER.— 

Joseph M. Caldwell of Milford, 
Jeremiah P. McNally of Salem, 
Charles E. Peakes of Weston, 
Elmer A. Stevens of Somerville, 
Augustus L. Thorndike of Brewster, 
Blank, 



1 vote 


61 votes 


4 " 


109 " 


2 " 


3 " 


1 vote 


105 votes 


3 " 


1 vote 


65 votes 


5 " 


55 votes 


5 " 


1 vote 


102 votes 


17 " 


1 vote 


1 " 


4 votes 


103 " 


51 " 


20 " 



29 



AUDITOR.— 

Sylvester J. McBride of Watertown, 
William W. Nash of Westborough, 
Charles B. Strecker of Brookline, 
John E. White of Tisbury, 
Blank, 

ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 

George W. Anderson of Boston, 
George E. Roewer, Jr., of Boston, 
James M. Swift, of Boston, 
Blank, 

COUNCILLOR, Sixth District— 
Leander V. Calahan of Stoneham, 
Herbert E. Fletcher of Westford, 
Blank, 

SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District— 
Charles F. McCarthy of Marlboro, 
Edward A. Walker of Waltham, 
Blank, 



3 votes 


4 


n 


52 


a 


100 


a 


21 


a 


57 votes 


2 


u 


103 


it 


18 


it 


50 votes 


105 


it 


25 

• 


a 


67 votes 


106 


a 


7 


u 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
13th Middlesex District — 

Warren Langmaid Bishop of Wayland, 59 votes 

Waldo L. Stone of Sudbury, 105 " 

John C. Wright of Wayland, 1 vote 

Blank, 15 votes 



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, Middlesex County.— 
Charles J. Barton of Melrose, 54 votes 

Levi S. Gould of Melrose, 103 " 

Blank, 23 " 



30 

CLERK OF COURTS, Middlesex County.— 

William C. Dillingham of Maiden, 105 votes 

Thomas F. Reams of Waltham, 53 " 

Blank, 22 " 

REGISTER OF DEEDS, Middlesex South District:— 
Edwin D. Childs of Newton, 109 votes 

Charles Lee Shea of Somerville, 43 " 

Blank, 28 " 

"Shall the proposed amendment to the constitution 
authorizing the use of voting machines at election be 
approved and ratified?" 

Yes, 63 votes 

No, 32 " 

Blank, 85 " 

" Shall the proposed amendment to the Constitution 
increasing the power of the legislature to authorize the 
taking of land and property for highways or streets, be 
approved and rectified?" 

Yes, 64 votes 

No, 29 " 

Blank, 87 " 

Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and eleven, entitled "An Act authoriz- 
ing the Counties of the Commonwealth to establish re- 
tirement systems for their employees" be authorized? 

Yes, 52 votes 

No, 38 " 

Blank, 90 " 

Voted to adjourn. 

Attest: GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



31 



Town Clerk's Meeting. 

Vote for the Middlesex Representative, District No. 13, 
to the General Court, as obtained and disclosed at the 
meeting of the Town Clerks of the District, held at 
Concord, November 17, 1911, at 12 o'clock noon. 

Bed. Con. Lin. Sud. Way. Wes.Total 



Bishop of Way- 












land, 


86 329 59 


40 


217 


50 


781 


Stone of Sudbury 


115 476 105 


138 


161 


277 


1,272 


Wright of Way- 












land, 


2 6 1 


2 


45 


2 


58 


Blank, 


8 44 15 


6 


11 


18 


102 



Total, 211 855 180 186 434 348 2,213 

Two Certificates for Waldo L. Stone of Sudbury were 
signed by 
Abbott R. Webber, Town Clerk of Bedford. 
Erastus H. Smith, Asst. Town Clerk of Concord. 
George L. Chapin Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Frank F. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 
Daniel Brackett, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
George W. Cutting, Town Clerk of Weston. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



32 



There have been recorded during the year ending 
Dec. 31, 1911, 22 Births, 13 Marriages, 17 Deaths. 



Births Registered. 



Date 


of Birth. 


Name of Child. 


Names of Parents. 


Jan. 


24, 


1911. 


Adella Langille 


Isaac and Adella (Waugh. ) 


Jan. 


6, 


1910. 


Anna Marion Danner 


John and Grace M. L. (Bamforth. ) 


Nov. 


30, 


1910. 


Edna Mence Hayes 


Harry S. B. and Fannie (Evans. ) 


Feb. 


17, 


1911. 


Warren Fiske Flint 


Ephraim B. and Edith F. (Whitney. ) 


Feb. 


24, 




Francis Joseph O'Hern 


Timothy and Josephine (Leehan. ) 


Mar. 


1, 




Louisa Mary Graf 


Edward and Mary (MacLeod. ) 


Mar. 


14, 




Elizabeth Brimmer Bosley 


Frederick A. and Emily Linzee (Sohier) 


April 


13, 




Robert Carleton Cousins 


Fred E. and Mary Ashley (Flint. ) 


May 


28, 




John Thomas Hayes 


John J. and Delia A. (Kelly. ) 


June 


15, 




Robert Rantoul 


Aug. and Matilda Charlotte P. (Talbot. ) 


July 


8, 




Howard Snelling, Jr. 


Howard and Eleanor G. (Goodwin. ) 


July 


25, 




Nicolletta Catona 


Nicola and Carolina (Movaca. ) 


Aug. 


27 




Elizabeth Florence McCormick 


Frederick W. and Ellen (Brown. ) 


Oct. 


3, 




Lily Chapman 


Duncan G. and Lily (Topliss. ) 


Oct. 


4, 




Charlotte Donaldson 


Robert D. and Charlotte H. (Alcock. ) 


Oct. 


25, 




William Edward Harris 


William P. and Ida (Tyler. ) 


*Nov 


• 2, 




Patrick Thomas Sheppard 


Albert E. and Annie (Magee. ) 


♦Oct. 


27, 




Caroline Marion Seeckts 


Albert and Marion E. (Ehlert. ) 


Dec. 


10, 




Harriet Pomeroy Hart 


Joaeph S. and Harriet L. (Darling. ) 


Dec. 


10, 




Elizabeth Murray Hart 


Joseph S. and Harriet L. (Darling. ) 


Dec. 


19, 




James Bernard Lennon 


Patrick J. and Mary J. (McDonald. ) 


Dec. 


20, 




Ellsworth Mason Wheeler 


Elmer E. and Beatrice (Kitchell. ) 



33 



Marriages Registered. 



Date of Marriage. 



Jan. 20, 1911. 
Jan. 20, •' 
April 5, 
April 16, " 
April 19, " 
June 1,, " 
Sept. 11, " 
Oct. 4, 

Nov. 8, 
Nov. S, •' 
Nov. 16, " 

Nov. 30, " 



Name. 



Albert Seeckts. 
Marion Eleanor Ehlert. 

James B. Kenna. 

Rheba Carter. 

William C. Ware. 
Mary Louise Brooks. 

Michael Quinn. 
Bridget Connolly. 

Henry A. Butcher. 
Bessie E. Wetherbee. 

Jack Grant. 
Signe Blomfeldt. 

Albert Snow Graves. 
Myra Atwcod Southworth. 

Ralph E. Butcher. 
Annie Gilbert. 



John O. Algeo. 
Mary Alice Dee. 

Albert G. Enman. 
Alice C. Flynn. 

Clifford Fitzgerald. 
Lillian Kimber. 



Henry Nelson Bean. 
Bertha Blanche Bean. 



Winthrop Warren Bishop. 
Mary Connell. 



Residence. 



Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 

Lincoln. 
Waltham. 

Warner, N. H. 

Lincoln. 

Boston. 
Lincoln. 

Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 



Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 



Lincoln. 
Newton. 



Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 



Concord. 
Lincoln. 



Boston. 
Lincoln. 



Canaan, Conn. 
Lincoln. 



Lincoln. 
Newfields, N. H. 



Sterling, Mass. 
Lincoln. 



34 



Deaths Registered. 



Date of Death. 


Name. 


Age. 

Y. 


M. 


D. 


Feb. 10, 1911. 


Arlene Whitney. 




5 


14 


March 29, " 


John Ryan. 


56 


6 




April 6, 


Mary Flynn. 


G8 


— 


— 


April 19, 


Gertrude Cousins. 


1 


2 


4 


May 3, 


Henry Pangborn. 


20 


4 


7 


May 26, 


Willard Patterson. 






1 


Aug. 9, 


Hazel E. Murray. 


1 


2 


— 


Sept. 29, " 


Hazel Elrnira Stevenson. 


14 


10 


21 


*0ct. 28, " 


Joseph A. Ropes. 


72 


5 


24 


Oct. 29, 


Mary E. Cook. 


55 


10 


5 


*Oct. 10, " 


John Dee, 


79 


— 


— 


Nov. 6, 


Amelia L. Johnson. 


83 


5 


12 


Nov. 14, " 


Mary Evelyn Hayes. 


63 


7 


17 


Nov. 24, " 


Edward Little Rogers. 


54 


4 


26 


Dec. 9. 


Patrick Thomas Sheppard. 




1 


7 


Dec. 13, 


Michael Godonie. 


52 


— 


— 


Dec. 21, 


Marion E. Christensen. 


31 


2 


28 



35 



EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS, Chap. 29. 

Sect. 3. Physicians and midwives shall on or before 
the fifth day of each month, report to the Clerk of each 
City or Town a correct list of all children born therein 
during the preceding month at whose birth they were pres- 
ent, stating the date and place of each birth, the name, if 
any, of the child, its sex and color, and the name, place of 
birth and residence of the parents, the maiden name of the 
mother, and the occupation of the father. A physician or 
midwife who neglects to report such list on or before the 
fifteenth day of the month shall for each offence forfeit not 
more than twenty-five dollars. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the 
birth of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to be 
given to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such child 
is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other 
person who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be 
given notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for 
ten days after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not 
more than five dollars for such offence. 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1911. 

There have been 151 licenses issued as follows: — 121 
Males, 24 Females, 5 Spayed Females and 1 Kennel, for 
which $397.80 have been paid to the County Treasurer. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

County Clerk. 



36 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

Having examined the accounts of the Town Treasurer, 
the Treasurer of the Sinking and Trust Fund, Cemetery 
and Commissioners in their presence I found their ac- 
counts to be correct. I have seen vouchers for all money 
paid and all securities of the Town in their charge. I 
submit herewith an account of the money paid by the 
Treasurer on the Selectmen's orders. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



37 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Selectmen present the following report for the 
fiscal year ending January 31, 1912: — 

The Board was organized at a special meeting by the 
choice of Charles S. Smith, Chairman, and R. D. Donald- 
son, Secretary. 

The following table gives the appropriations made by 
the Town during the year 1911, and the appropriations 
recommended by the Board to be made at the next 
Annual Meeting: — 



For Schools, 

Support of Poor, 
Highways and Bridges, 
Librae, Dog Tax, and 
Interest, 
Cemeteries, 
Board of Health, 
Tree Warden, 
State Aid, 

Miscellaneous Expenses, 
Payment of Water Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, Water, 
Hydrant and other public 
water service, 



Appropriations 
for 1911. 


The Selectmen 

recommend 

the following 

appropriations 

for the ensuing 

year 


$9,000 00 

500 00 


$9,000 00 
500 00 


5,500 00 
400 00 


7,500 00 
400 00 


500 00 


500 00 


250 00 


250 00 


300 00 


200 00 


3,300 00 

48 00 


2,000 00 

8 00 


4,500 00 
1,500 00 
2,173 37 


4,500 00 
1,500 00 
2,173 37 



2,400 00 2,400 00 



38 



Waltham Hospital, Free Be 


d, 250 00 


250 00 


Street Lamps, 


1,000 00 


1,300 00 


Fire Department, 


100 00 


300 00 


Payment new schoolhouse 






bonds, 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Payment Interest New 






Schoolhouse Bonds, 


1,960 00 


1,720 00 


Suppression Liquor Nuis- 






ance, 


200 00 


200 00 


Lee's Bridge, 


2,500 00 


4,000 00 



Appointments 

Burial Agent, H. E. Barnes. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Special Police, James E. Baker, John W. Rocks, John 
F. Farrar, Joseph DeLory, William A. Harding, William 
E. Chute. 

Forest Fire Wardens, Charles S. Smith, C. Lee Todd, 
R. D. Donaldson, I. N. MacRae, John F. Farrar, James 
E. Baker, Wallace M. Brooks, Charles S. Wheeler. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at Annual State Election, 
James W. Lennon, Malcoln Eveleth, Thomas L. Giles, 
and Herbert G. Farrar. 

Superintendent of Streets, John F. Farrar. 

Janitor of Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 



39 



Finances 

* 

The Town now has a bonded debt on account of its 

Water Department of $87,000.00, as follows:— 
Issue of 



1894, 


$4,000 00, due one each 


year. 


1897, 


10,000 00 4 % bonds, due 1917. 


1900, 


23,000 00 3|% " 


' 1930. 


1902, 


9,000 00 3J% " 


' 1932. 


1903, 


5,000 00 4 % " 


' 1933. 


1904, 


5,000 004 % " 


1 1934. 


1906, 


14,000 00 4 % " 


' 1936. 


1907, 


4,000 00 4 % " 


' 1937. 


1911, 


n,000 00 4 % serial 


1912tol924 



Sixteen $500,00 bonds, $8,000.00, one each year. 
Total bonded indebtedness, $87,000.00. 

From this total indebtedness should be deducted the 
amount of money now in the Sinking Fund, to retire 
issues of 1897, 1900, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1906, and 1907, at 
maturity. 

The total bond issue on account of the new schoolhouse 
was $55,000.00, of which $12,000.00 has been retired, 
leaving bonded indebtedness on this account, Januray 1, 
1912, of $43,000.00. 

It will be necessary for the Town to appropriate 
$3,000.00 to retire bonds this year, also to appropriate 
$1,720.00 on account of interest on the $43,000.00 out- 
standing bonds. 

There is, however, a sinking fund of $3,000.00 pro- 
vided by the appropriatiom of last year, which makes the 
net indebtedness on account of the new schoolhouse 
$40,000.00. 

The Town Treasurer's report shows that he has in the 
treasury $1,244.82, and that there are uncollected 
taxes amounting to $337.80, making total available 



40 

money in the treasury of $1,582.62. Considering the 
fact t hat there was paid during the past year $5,200.00 on 
the water and schoolhouse debts, more than was required 
by the terms of the loan, we consider the Treasurer's 
statement very satisfactory. 



Support of Poor 

The Town has fully supported during the year Caro- 
line Preble, but the Board has been notified that on and 
after February 1st, there will be no expense on her ac- 
count. 

The Town has also contributed to the support of other 
citizens as per the Auditor's Report. 



Fire Department. 

This department has been conducted during the year 
as heretofore. For a more detailed report, reference is 
made to the report of the Fire Engineer. 

Several forest fires have occurred during the year, 
which have been primarily due to carelessness in burning 
brush near woodland. The proper article has been in- 
serted in the warrant, which will bring this matter up for 
discussion and action, if desirable. 



Tree Warden 

The report of the Tree Warden gives a full account of 
the work that has been done, with the results obtained, 
and recommendations for the future. As far as we have 
been able to observe, the department has been conducted 
in a creditable manner. 



41 

Silent Poor Fund 

The Board has not received any application for aid 
from this Fund during the year. The fund is as reported 
by the Treasurer of the Trust Committee. 

Highways 

On account of the very full report made by the Super- 
intendent of Highways, it does not seem necessary for us 
to refer to the matter, except to repeat what was said 
last year, that the increased use of automobiles has in- 
jured the surface of the roads materially and made an 
increased expenditure and appropriation necessary; also, 
the use of automobiles has had a tendency to make the 
dust nuisance almost unbearable, and it has been neces- 
sary to use large quantities of oil at a considerable cost. 

In matter of Lee's Bridge, to which reference has 
been made in the last two annual reports, the County 
Commissioners amended their order with respect to the 
same by which a bridge was ordered constructed on 
the old location, which location has always been favored 
by the Board of Selectmen as being much more practical 
and economical than the one further up the river, origi- 
nally selected by the Commissioners. An appropriation 
was made at the last town meeting on this account of 
$2,500.00. 

After the order was amended, Mr. Charles Francis 
Adams offered to contribute towards the expense of 
building the bridge a sum which would be necessary, in 
order to complete a bridge which would be not only prac- 
tical, but ornamental. 

After various consultations with the County Commis- 
sioners and Selectmen a contract was finally executed, by 
which Mr. Adams has undertaken to build a bridge in 
accordance with the order of the County Commissioners, 
which will cost in the vicinity of $30,000.00. 



42 

The important correspondence respecting the matter 
as far as Mr. Adams is concerned, is as follows:— 

India Building 

84 State Street 

Boston. 

June 30, 1911. 
My dear Mr. Smith: 

I have communicated with the Misses Williams in 
relation to Lee's Bridge. They are very much interested 
in the matter, but clearly do not see their way to making 
any contribution for the artistic improvement thereof. 
I have not heard anything further from Messrs. Wor- 
cester and Codman. The last intimation which reached 
me was that such a bridge as I had in mind would prob- 
ably cost about $16,000, or nearly three times what a 
purely commercial bridge would cost. I hardly feel 
disposed to go to that extent; although, I must say, it 
does annoy me when such an opportunity for an effect is 
thrown away; and that forever. I should be very glad 
indeed to put my monument, so far as Lincoln is con- 
cerned, at that point. I hope, therefore, before anything 
final is done, that Messrs. Codman and Worcester, to- 
gether with the Commissioners, will give me ampl'e time 
to reach a deliberate and final conclusion. 
Believe me, etc., 

(Sd.) CHARLES F. ADAMS. 

Charles S. Smith, Esq., 
Lincoln, Mass. 

India Building, 

84 State Street 

Boston. 

July 7, 1911. 
My dear Mr. Smith: 

You asked me, at the station this morning, whether I 
had given any attention to the Lee's Bridge matter. I 



43 

returned a somewhat evasive answer; inasmuch as, in 
my case, the recent hot wave has materiaally interfered 
with all activities, I do not stand that kind of thing quite 
so well now as I did some thirty years ago. 

Enclosed please find a copy of a letter which I wrote, 
on the 5th inst. to Mr. Codman. It states the situation 
up to date, so far as I am concerned, with sufficient 
accuracy. 

I remain, etc., 

(Sd.) CHARLES F. ADAMS. 

Charles S. Smith, Esq., 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Boston, July 5, 1911. 
My dear Stephen: 

The more I think of it, the more inclined I am to leave 
my monument in the form of Lee's Bridge, in Concord. 

I wish you and Mr. Worcester, therefore, would hurry 
up matters, and submit the plan to me at an early date. 

I want something which would be in the nature of a 
Memorial Bridge. I would arrange for the approaches 
with the Misses Williams, and give the necessary height 
to the arch of the span. 

I want something, however, which is solid, dignified 
and lasting; something which will, as a matter of taste, 
stand better a century hence than now. Simplicity 
always is a large element in anything of the sort. The 
two go together — simplicity and massiveness. The 
Roman arch is the best and most enduring. 

I wish, therefore, you would consult Mr. Worcester, 
and give this matter early attention. I do not want to 
spend a fortune on the structure ; and, therefore, the cost 
must not be left out of consideration. Meanwhile, I 
would like something which would be individual, lasting 
and educational. 



44 

Do you feel disposed, in this warm weather, to grapple 
with the problem? 
Believe me, etc., 

(Sd. ) CHARLES F. ADAMS. 

Stephen Codman, Esq., 
31 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

The towns of Lincoln and Concord will contribute 
such sum to the expense of the construction of this bridge 
as they would have contributed had a simple commercial 
bridge been erected, or, jointly the sum of $7,000.00. 
The division between the towns will be $5,500.00 to 
Lincoln and $1,500.00 to Concord. On the completion 
of the bridge to the satisfaction of the Commissioners 
on the orders already issued, the town will receive from 
the County $1,650, which will make the net cost of the 
bridge to the town approximately $4,000.00. Inasmuch 
as $2,500.00 was appropriated at the last annual meeting, 
only a small portion of which has been used, we recom- 
mend that the town appropriate $4,000.00 for this pur- 
pose. 

The bridge which Mr. Adams is to construct will not 
only be a larger bridge, but one which will be ornamental, 
and in every respect as good as can be built. 

The Selectmen feel that by reason of the delay in the 
construction of this bridge, which they have been largely 
instrumental in causing, the town has reason to be ex- 
tremely well satisfied, not only by having the bridge 
erected on the old location, where it can be more cheaply 
constructed, but also in the fact that Mr. Adams is 
erecting such a beautiful bridge. 

The widening of the Station Road near the center of 
the town has been completed; a sidewalk has been con- 
structed as far as the schoolhouse lot, and this section of 



45 

road is now in first-class condition. We think that the 
roads on the whole are in better condition than they were 
last year. 

By expending $7,500.00, the amount recommended to 
be appropriated, allowing $1,000.00 for the purchase of 
oil, and $1,000 for the purchase of crushed stone and 
81,800.00 for Superintendent's salary and keeping the 
horses, there would remain a balance of $3,700.00, which 
would provide labor for nine men for 200 days. It 
seems to the Board that this appropriation will be suffi- 
cient, if properly expended, to put the roads in a per- 
manently better condition. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
CHARLES L. TODD, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



4(5 



SCHOOLS 
Payments 

C. S. Lyman, Services as Supt. of Schools, $500 00 

C. S. Lyman, Cash Expenses, 18 30 
Walter F. Brackett, Director of Manual Arts, 550 00 
Carrie B. Chapin, Teaching, 650 50 
Hattie B. Heath, Teaching, 575 00 
S. V. Sanborn, Teaching, . 62 50 
Lillian H. Shaw, Teaching, 250 00 
A. P. Smith, Teaching, 313 57 
A. M. Clifford, Teaching, 213 80 
G. E. Brooks, Teaching, 437 50 
Mary Gallagher, Teaching, 10 00 
H. J. Bartlett, Teaching, 220 00 
H. J. McCarthy, Teaching, 20 00 

D. H. Haviland, Teaching, 225 00 
A. L. F. Edwards, Teaching, 240 00 

E. R. Cushing, Teaching, 168 00 
K. McGill, 6 00 
James B. Wheeler, Carrying Children, 543 00 
James B. Wheeler, Repairs on Barge, 2 86 
George L. Cousins, Carrying Children, 538 25 
Thomas J. Dee, Carrying Children, 522 00 
John F. Farrar & Son, Carrying Children, 80 00 
J. F. Baker & Son, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 17 85 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Carrying Children, 10 50 
Charles Wetherbee, Carving Pupil to Concord, 11 70 
L. E. Brooks, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 17 45 
C. D. Sargent, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 17 55 
E. Russell Davis, Janitor, South School, 127 90 
Edward Bannon, Janitor, Lincoln School, 500 00 
H. A. Wood, M.D., School Physicain, 200 00 
National Express Co., Express, 3 10 



47 

Town of Concord, Tuition, 

City of Waltham Tuition, 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, 

Boston & Maine R.R., School Ticket, 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Coal, 

F. A. Cooper, Painting, 

C. S. Wheeler, Insurance, So. School. 

B. K. Pratt Coal Co., Coal, 
E. Howard Clock Co., Repairs, 
J. A. Burgess, Repairs on Barge, 
Dan. McAskill, Repairs on Barge, 
M. Steinmann, Repairs on Barge, 
Herbert Neally, Repairs on Barge, 
Thomas McGann, Repairs on Barge, 
King & Kelley, Repairs on Barge, 
Annie L. Foreman, School Census, 
E. W. Pope, Milk, 
Lincoln Water Works, New School, 
Lincoln Water Works, So. School, 
Current Events, Printing. 
I. N. MacRae, Labor, 
J. L. Hammett Co., Supplies, 
American Book Co., Supplies, 
Houghton Mfg. Co., Supplies, 
Milton Bradley Co., Supplies, 
Ginn & Co., Supplies, 
Edward E. Babb & Co., Supplies, 
Silver Burdett Co., Supplies, 
Chandler & Barber, Supplies, 
Wagnalls & Co., Supplies, 
Linen Thread Co., Supplies, 
H. Goldberger, Supplies, 

C. G. Fairbanks, Supplies, 
Perry Picture Co., Supplies, 
Prang & Co., Supplies 6 64 



885 80 


130 00 


24 91 


326 69 


14 41 


2 00 


3 00 


33 60 


413 18 


5 00 


9 00 


10 00 


2 80 


22 00 


13 00 


54 50 


10 00 


1 84 


75 00 


25 50 


8 00 


15 29 


3 96 


27 40 


5 68 


11 16 


60 05 


269 58 


9 45 


1 40 


1 13 


6 60 


7 10 


2 00 


2 42 



48 



1). C. Heath Co., Supplies, 
Atkinson & Co., Supplies, 
J. H. Reynolds, Supplies, 
F. H. Brown, Supplies, 
Buttrick Lumber Co., Supplies, 

A. M. McLeod, Supplies, 

B. F. Macey, Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 
J. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
F. L. Goldsmith, Supplies, 

Total, 



37 


90 




60 




60 


4 


50 


51 


54 


1 


07 


11 


25 


8 


77 


85 67 


2 


55 


$9,756.87 



HIGHWAYS 
Payments 



John W. Rooney, Labor on Highways, $317 66 

Martin J. Rooney, Labor on Highways, 533 87 

William H. Ryan, Labor on Highways, 449 46 

Dennis Doherty, Labor on Highways, 384 17 

Patrick Craven, Labor on Highways, 341 67 

Andrew Doherty Labor on Highways, 2 00 

Henry Butcher, Labor on Highways, 8 00 

Thomas Barnes, Labor on Highways, 4 00 

Albert Sutton, Labor on Highways, 28 00 

James Diamond, Labor on Highways, 47 00 

John Johnson, Labor for Highway Dept., 781 66 

John F. Farrar, Superintendent of Streets, 731 67 

Frank Cunningham, Labor, 352 00 

John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 402 11 



49 



Cunningham Bros., Labor, 

D. E. Sherman, Labor, 
R. D. Donaldson, Labor, 
H. S. Cousins & Co., Labor, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Labor, 

C. H. Bamforth Labor, 
Thomas L. Giles, Labor, 
I. N. MacRae, 

M. Keane, Inscription on Stone, 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Grain, 

B. W. Brown, Grain, 

J. W. Raymond, Grain, 

E. R. Farrar, Hay, 

D. E. Sherman, Hay, 

C. S. Smith, Gravel, 
P. Craven, Gravel, 

G. W. Browning, Gravel, 
Annie Morrissey, Stone, 
M. Tankle, Stone, 
Daniel Holman, Stone, 
John Fleming, Stone, 

M. Connors, Stone, 

L. E. Brooks, Stone, 

Wallace M. Brooks, Stone, 

Eugene Jose, Stone, 

Horace Paine, Stone, 

Edward McHugh, Stone, 

B. W. Pearson, Stone, 

Thomas J. Dee, Stone, 

R. E. Butcher, Stone, 

Waltham Trap Rock, Stone, 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Services, 

E. S. Bent, Rent of Barn, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Rent of Barn, 
J. F. Farrar & Son, 1500 lbs. Straw, 
Marcy & Co., Coal, 



$37 00 

252 00 

103 08 

36 75 

10 00 

2 00 

27 50 

4 72 
12 50 

182 23 

610 18 

43 66 

23 80 
155 43 

55 65 
1 90 

24 75 

12 00 
18 00 

6 00 

9 00 

18 00 

5 20 
230 60 

41 20 

6 80 
9 40 

32 77 

5 00 

77 07 

994 45 

13 66 
58 66 
62 50 
11 25 
18 97 



50 



M. L. Snelling, Coal, 

J. A. Burgess, Shoeing and Repairing, 

Dan McAskill, Shoeing and Repairing, 

John MacComber, Repairing, 

A. D. Hayes, Repairing, 

Lincoln Water Works, Repairing, 

Standard Oil Co., 260 bbls. Road Oil, 

W. Chisholm, Ladder, 

S. R. Snelling, Team, 

Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, 

Wallace M. Brooks, Rent of Land, 

Thomas Coburn, Use of Steam Roller, 

H. L. Alderman, Medical Attendance, 

Good Road Machine Co., Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

Ames Plow Company, Supplies, 

Eastern Drug Co., Supplies, 

D. H. Sherman, Supplies, 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 

A. D. Hayes, Supplies, 

J. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 



Total, 



MOTH WORK 



15 00 


163 10 


44 05 


56 40 


21 00 


2 95 


964 14 


3 00 


5 00 


7 97 


54 70 


25 00 


110 00 


9 00 


9 00 


67 97 


1 88 


1 20 


25 74 


11 50 


46 00 


10 75 



$9,252 40 



Payments 

E. R. Farrar, Services as Tree Warden, $70 50 

E. R. Farrar, Horse Hire, 19 50 

E. R. Farrar, Postage, 3 00 

E. R. Farrar, Housing Sprayer, 25 00 



51 



John J. Kelliher, Services as Tree Warden. 

John J. Kelliher, Supplies, 

Burt Pearson, Labor, 

Burt Pearson, Horse Hire, 

Charles R. Butcher, Labor, 

Henry A. Butcher, Labor, 

Henry A. Butcher, Horse Hire, 

James O'Brien, Labor, 

James O'Brien, Horse Hire, 

Norman Fleming, Labor, 

John Fleming, Labor, 

John Cannair, Labor, 

Thomas Barnes, Labor, 

Patrick J. Lennon, Labor, 

William Riley, Labor, 

A. J. Dougherty, Labor, 

D. E. Sherman, Labor, 

S. R. Snelling, Labor, 

Highway Dept. Labor, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, 

J. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

White's Garage, Supplies, 

John MacComber, Repairs, 

John A. Burgess, Repairs, 

Dan McAskill, Repairs, 

James E. Baker, Cash paid for freight, 

James T. Laird, Horse Hire, 

Frost Insecticide Co., Repairing, 



Total, 



556 


50 


4 


31 


137 82 


75 


00 


173 


75 


560 46 


28 


00 


230 


64 


26 00 


115 


32 


103 


51 


479 


77 


355 


00 


317 


27 


303 


77 


63 


75 


75 00 


117 


22 


93 


50 


36 45 


9 44 


1 


58 


5 


75 


5 75 


2 


75 


7 00 


1 


30 


10 


50 


3 


00 


$4,018 


11 





52 




TREE 


WARDEN 




John J. Kelliher, Superintendent, 


$129 00 


James O'Brien, Labor, 




65 25 


Thomas Barnes, Labor, 




77 00 


William Riley, Labor, 




18 00 


Patrick J. Lennon, Labor, 




12 38 


John Cannair, Labor, 




6 75 


Henry A. Butcher, Labor, 




7 88 


Dan McAskill, Repairs, 




1 75 


M. H. Doherty, Supplies, 




5 00 



Total, $323 01 



STATE AID 



Payments 
John Tasker, 12 payments at $4.00, $48 00 



WIDENING STATION ROAD 



Payments 
R. D. Donaldson, second payment, $1,000 00 



53 
SUPPORT OF POOR 



Payments 

Commonwealth of Mass., Care of Caroline Preble, $79 70 

City of Waltham, Care of Mrs. Ellsworth, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Care of M. J. Pollard, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Care of J. Hanley, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Care of C. Haynes, 

Mary Rooney, Care of M. J. Pollard, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Care of Guy Dinsmore, 

Waltham Hospital, Care of Guy Dinsmore, 

B. S. Parker, Collector, Care of Charles Haynes, 

Total, $258 42 



38 


27 


20 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


18 


00 


2 


20 


56 


25 


Les, 40 


00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Payments 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Care of Fire Wagon, 
J. T. Laird, 2 Chemicals, 
Henry K. Barnes, Supplies, 
Merrill Dexter & Co., Supplies, 

Total, $218 24 



$25 


00 


20 00 


171 


00 


2 


24 



HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE 



Payments 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Town Hall, $33 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Hydrants, 1,710 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Watering Troughs, 515 57 



Total, $2,258 57 



54 
CEMETERY 



Payments 

C. S. Wheeler, A. A. Ray Legacy for Investment, $300 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, 

New England Nurseries, Trimming Hedge, 

James T. Laird, Sharpening Mowers, 

Roger Sherman, Labor, 

Total, $663 54 



LINCOLN LIBRARY 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



10 00 


55 


60 


8 


75 


289 


19 



Payments 

John F. Farrar, Dog Tax Returned, $384 77 

John F. Farrar, Town Appropriation, 400 00 

John F. Farrar, Special Appropriation, 300 00 



Total, $1,084 77 



Payments 
Waltham Hospital, Appropriation, $250 00 



55 
JOSE WATER EXTENSION 



Payment 
Town Treasurer, $1,200 00 



EXTRA SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 
Sinking and Trust Fund, Appropriation, $3,000 00 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Payments 

M. M. Welch, Fumigating, $16 00 

National Express Co., Express, 44 



Total, $16 44 



LEE'S BRIDGE 



Payments 
J. R. Worcester & Co., Plans, etc., $337 86 



56 
STREET LIGHTS 



Payments. 

Edison Electric Illuminating Co., January, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., Febraury, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., March, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., April, 
Edison Electric Illumianting Co., May, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., June, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., July, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., August, 
Edicon Electric Illuminating Co., September, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., October, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., November 
Edison Electric Illuminating Co., December, 



Total $1,113 88 



$98 50 


93 68 


90 37 


86 31 


81 83 


83 09 


81 10 


85 48 


95 00 


105 32 


106 58 


106 62 



INTEREST 



Payments 

C. S. Wheeler, Note, due Dec. 1, 1911, 
First National Bank, Discount on Note 2 
Payment of Town Notes, 
First National Bank, Payment, Note 1, 
First National Bank, Payment, Note 2, 



$201 


36 


2, 131 


28 


332 


64 


10,000 00 


10,000 


00 


$20,000 00 



57 

SPECIAL WATER ACCOUNT SINKING FUND 



Payments 
Tresaurer, Water Bonds, $2,200 00 



BONDS ACCOUNT NEW SCHOOLHOUSE 



Payments 
First National Bank, Sehoolhouse Bonds, $3,000 00 



INTEREST ACCOUNT NEW SCHOOLHOUSE 
BONDS 



Payments 

First National Bank, Coupons, due Jan. 1, 1912, $920 00 
First National Bank, Coupons, due July 1, 1912, 920 00 



Total, $1,840 00 



58 
MISCELLANEOUS 



Payments 

Edward Bannon, Services as Janitor, $499 96 

National Express Co., Express, 2 96 

John F. Farrar, Special Police, 1910, 15 00 

J. T. Laird, Services as Constable, 25 00 

Geo. E. Cunningham, Services as Constable, 42 00 

Winslow A. Eaton, Services as Constable, 25 00 

Geo. E. Cunningham, Court Expenses, 23 85 

John F. Farrar, Special Police, 1911, 20 00 

James T. Laird, Posting Warrants, etc., 21 00 

New England Telephone, Services, 43 83 

P. B. Murphy, Printing, 3 15 

George E. Crosby Co., Printing, 315 45 

C. S. Smith, Printing, 6 54 

Mary E. Cuff, Printing, 11 45 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 2 50 

William Ferguson, Printing, 2 95 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, Hall, 15 28 

B. K. Pratt Coal Co., Coal, Hall, 273 65 
Mrs. Edward Bannon, Repairing Flag, 2 00 
Edison Light Co., Services of Lights, 28 45 

C. S. Wheeler, Cash paid for Certification Notes, 9 00 
J. S. Hart, M.D., Returning Births, 2 50 
Herbert E. Barnes, Returning Deaths, 4 50 
M. M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle, 19 50 
John Tasker, Expense, May 30th, 8 50 
James T. Laird, two Chemicals, 20 00 
Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 25 
W. H. Brewster & Co., Insurance, 80 00 
Charles S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, 81 98 
Allen Bros., 20 Badges, Special Police, 15 00 
Horace J. Stevens, Court Fees, 47 



59 

J. T. Laird, Court Fees, $8 02 

J. T. Laird, Services at Election, 5 00 

J. W. Lennon, Services at Election and Primary, 7 00 
J. M. Eveleth, Services at Election and Primary, 7 00 

T. L. Giles, Services at Election and Primary 7 00 

H. G. Farrar, Services at Election, 5 00 

William H. Sherman, Assessor, • 50 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Assessor, 50 00 

William C. Pierce, Assessor and Copying, 75 00 

Charles S. Smith, Selectmen, 150 00 

Chalres S. Smith, Overseer, 25 00 

Charles S. Smith, Registrar, 10 00 

Charles S. Smith, Postage, 5 32 

R. D. Donaldson, Selectman, 150 00 

R. D. Donaldson, Overseer, 25 00 

R. D. Donaldson, Registrar, 10 00 

C. L. Todd, Selectman, 150 00 

C. L. Todd, Overseer, 25 00 

C. L. Todd, Registrar, 10 00 
M. H. Doherty, Sealer of Weights and Measures, 40 00 

Geo. L. Chapin, Town Clerk, 100 00 

Geo. L. Chapin, Registrar, 15 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Town Treasurer, etc., 313 12 

C. S. Wheeler, Collector of Taxes, 1910, 551 16 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, Hall, 17 00 

H. J. Cooper, Labor, 3 00 

Badger & Co., Labor, 11 00 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor, Town Hall, 15 76 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor, Town Scales, 3 70 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor, Old Schoolhouse, 5 75 

L. E. Bazley, Labor, 9 89 

Cunningham Bros., Labor, 427 00 

I. N. MacRae, Labor, Town Hall, 7 78 

Hobbs & Warren, Supplies, 75 

Thomas Groom & Co., Supplies, 17 75 

J. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 10 37 



60 



Pettingell & Co., Supplies, 

H. K. Barnes, Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

C. E. Woodhall, Tuning Pianos, 

A. J. Doherty, Services % Old Schoolhouse, 

T. J. Dee, Care of Fire Hose, 

W. C. Robus, Care of Fire Hose, 

C. H. Rooney, Care of Fire Hose, 

M. J. Rooney, Care of Fire Hose, 

J. W. Rooney, Care of Fire Hose, 

Thomas Martin, Care of Fire Hose, 

Joseph Mahan, Care of Fire Hose, 

Frank Hosea, Fighting Fire, 

C. S. Wheeler, 

C. Lunt & Son, 

Charles Foreman, 

M. Sherman, 

Martin Coffey, 

T. W. Smith, 

F. M. Moynihan, 

J. J. Moynihan, 

J. H. Welch, 

John Hayes, 

T. L. Giles, 

T. Ahearn, 

C. R. Butcher, 

J. E. McHugh, 

Geo. N. Bean, 

Thomas J. Dee, 

L. E. Bazley, 

J. W. Rooney, 

J. Mahan, 

H. Patnode, 

J. M. Chute, 

J. Monella, 

F. Monella, 



3 


17 


4 


00 


8 


16 


7 00 


50 


00 


15 


00 


3 


60 


2 80 


1 


20 


1 


20 


1 


20 


1 


20 


1 


20 


5 


80 


4 


80 


2 


40 


5 


20 




80 


9 4 




60 




60 




60 


5 


20 




40 


6 


80 


2 


00 


2 


90 


7 


20 


16 


90 


3 


20 


2 


80 


1 


20 


1 


20 




60 


3 


20 


3 


20 



61 



D. Monella, Fighting Fire, 


3 20 


P. Monella, 






3 20 


E. Bean, ' 






4 00 


N. Catone, l 






1 60 


J. Palmer, ' 






1 60 


M. J. Rooney, ' 






1 60 


John Ryan, ' 






2 00 


Charles Harding, ' 






3 00 


Harold Walley, ' 






2 80 


J. B. Wheeler, 






8 20 


R. D. Donaldson, ' 






2 60 


J. W. Nelson, 






2 80 


D. L. Hamilton, ' 






5 20 


J. T. Laird, 






60 


Kidder Bros., ' 






80 


W. A. Eaton, ' 






3 00 


J. Frazier, ' 






80 


P. J. Lennon, ' 






3 60 


W. C. Robus, 






3 20 


F. E. Cousins & Co., Labor, on account of Fires, 


115 40 


Isaac N. MacRae, Labor, on account of Fires, 


48 41 


Thirty-three Fireman at $2.00, 


66 00 


J. W. Lennon, Services i 


is Audil 


or, 


125 00 



Total, 



:,742 83 



LEGACY— JOHN H. PIERCE ESTATE 



Payment 



For Lincoln Library, 



$1,000 00 



62 



RECAPITULATION 



Schools, $9,756 87 

Highways, 9,252 40 

Moth Work, 4,018 11 

Tree Warden, 323 01 

Support of Poor, 258 42 

Public Library, 1,084 77 

Cemetery, 663 54 

Board of Health, 16 44 

Street Light, 1,113 88 

Water, 18,947 51 

Miscellaneous, 4,742 83 

Fire Department, 218 24 

Interest, 332 64 

Payment of Notes, 20,000 00 

State Aid, 48 00 

Wideing Station Road, 1,000 00 

Hydrants and other Water Service, 2,258 57 

Waltham Hospital, 250 00 

Jose Water Extension, 1,200 00 

Lee's Bridge, 337 86 

Interest, % New Schoolhouse Bonds, 1,840 00 

Bonds, % New Schoolhouse, 3,000 00 

Special Water % Sinking Fund, 2,200 00 
Extra Schoolhouse Bonds, Sinking and Trust 

Funds, 3,000 00 
Legacy, John H. Pierce Estate, for Lincoln Lib- 
rary to Commissioners of Trust Funds, 1,000 00 



Total, 



$86,863 09 



63 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND MEAT 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

I hereby submit the following report of animals slaugh- 
tered during year 1911: 

Cows 142 

Calves 382 

Bulls 4 

Pigs 1,094 

Sheep 2 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Inspector of Meat. 



64 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit the 
fourth annual report, ending January 31st, 1912: 

Force. 

Thirty-five men belong to the department: one chief, 
five assistant engineers, and twenty-nine call men. 
There are three organized companies. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus belonging to the department is . as 
follows : 

Three hose carriages, sixteen fire extinguishers and two 
ladders. 

Location of Apparatus 
No. 1. Hose House, old schoolhouse, Lincoln Center. 
No. 2. Kept at F. E. Cousins' grain store, South 
Lincoln. 

No. 3. Hose House, John Dee's farm, Virginia Road, 
North Lincoln. 

Fires 
The past year has been rather an unfortunate one, 
having the loss of one mill, one stable, and the partial 
loss of one stable and three dwelling houses, at a loss of 
about $20,000, and a number of chimney and brush fires. 
We would recommend the Town purchase a Motor 
Truck for the center of Town, and provide a place to keep 
the same. 

ISAAC N. MACRAE, Chief, 
WM. C. ROBUS, 
WM. SHERMAN, 
THOMAS DEE, 
HERBERT FARRAR, 
FRED. E. COUSINS, 

Board of Engineers. 



65 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Selectmen of Lincoln: — 

Sirs: — As Superintendent of Streets it is again my 
duty to report to you. Following the winter of last 
year, with its lack of snow and constant freezing and 
thawing, the roads were in a badly rutted condition. 
These ruts were filled practically all over the Town with 
cracked stone, which was wet down and rolled in, thus 
making a good smooth surface. The new road in front 
of the Barnes and Pierce places, which was left in an 
unfinished condition the fall before, necessitated a large 
and extra expense. During the spring and early summer 
we had about four months of very slight rainfall. This 
situation created a universal cry for a dust suppressor 
and oil was liberally distributed over as many of the 
highways as possible. Extra help and horses were em- 
ployed, and two scrapers used instead of one, to take the 
dish out of the highways and leave them with a crown. 
Gravel was taken from borrow-pits and roadsides, and 
the material used where it was deemed necessary. 

Several corners appeared to be causing inconvenience 
on account of the view being obstructed by brush and 
trees. The Tree Warden, of his own accord, and 
sometimes at my suggestion, has caused these corners to 
be opened in order to give travelers a clear view. In con- 
tinuing this subject I would say that with the consent 
of Mr. Codman, the high stone wall at the corner, 
known as the Stone Watering-trough Corner was rounded 
out and lowered so as to give travelers an unobstructed 
view from the Codman Road to the Station Road. 



66 

During our farmers' market season last fall I noticed 
quantities of wagons, strange to me, on our South Great 
Road. These wagons in order to go into the Boston 
market are supposed to display the owner's name and 
town on the side, and I plainly saw that many of them 
were off their regular route. I accosted a man, who seem- 
ed to be a prosperous farmer, and inquired why he 
was on that road. His answer was, "The state road 
where I used to travel through a part of Marlboro, Sub- 
bury and Wayland, is now turned over to automobilists, 
and the tar and tar products on the surface create a 
continual block to our wheels and make it extra hard for a 
newly shod horse to lift his shoes from the surface while 
smooth shod horses cannot travel at all, if trying to 
draw a heavy load." This extra travel, together with 
the normal travel, and in addition, the wear and tear 
from automobiles, will necessitate an extra expense for 
repairs to the South Great Road in the near future. 
From the junction of the South Great Road and the 
Concord and Wayland Road repairs should be made 
which will correspond with the new bridge now in process 
of construction. The bad curves between the Weston 
line and the railroad crossing should be removed. Since 
The Frost Company has cut the timber from the Whit- 
man and Jones places these curves seem sharper and 
the ledges more prominent. I went over the road with 
the County Engineer and one of the Commissioners and 
it was suggested that if the State, County and Town 
would combine, each paying one-third of the expense, a 
great and permanent benefit could be secured. 

I have stated in previous reports, that stone for the 
crusher was a scarcity. The price paid was forty cents 
per ton, and still there was a lack. The location of the 
crusher so far as draft is concerned is bad. The pull 
over Lincoln Hill and from there to East Lincoln or in 
any other direction will certainly sap the strength of 



67 

horses. Two feasible propositions for acquiring road 
material have been offered me. 

An agent of the Frost Co. offered to help move the 
crusher to South Lincoln, and agreed to furnish stone 
delivered on the platform as fast as the crusher could 
take care of it, for the next three years. This location in 
good working order, would take care of the South Great 
Road, the Tower Road, the Codman Road, through 
Walden woods to the Concord line, and in fact all the 
roads in the south and south centre of the Town. An- 
other fine location for the crusher is owned by Dr. S. H. 
Blodgett. This is more central, and I consider the ma- 
terial good. It consists of hard granite cobbles with 
sufficient gravel for cover. 

The open weather in November and December offered 
a great temptation to continue work. This temptation 
was not confined to myself for stones for the crusher 
came pouring in from all directions. There seemed to be 
nothing to do but grind them up and distribute them where 
they were most needed. Ruts were filled on the Pond 
Road, the Flint Road, in East Lincoln and various other 
places, and, I believe, L the work was wholly to the 
Town's advantage. Work went on very well until 
Frank Cummingham, who was running the crusher, was 
called to take Mr. Laird's place at the pumping station 
for a limited time. 

William Ryan, who is thoroughly familiar with the 
working of the plant, operated it by my direction. My 
idea was to crush and yard all the stone possible before 
moving the crusher, in order to have a supply on hand 
for future use in the north and east sections of the Town. 
Then the snow came, other difficulties arose and the 
work stopped. There is considerable stone now in the 
yard ready for the crusher, and crushed stone has been 
hauled to different parts of the Town ready for use in 
the Spring. 



68 

The Bent barn which the Town has occupied for the 
past few years was vacated July first, on account of the 
sale of the place, and Dr. Hart's barn was hired instead. 

The Tree Warden has stored the sprayers and other 
material there, so a part of the rent will be charged to 
his department. 

Our forefathers very wisely enacted a law requiring 
municipalities to erect and maintian guide-boards, and 
since the time has come when it is very easy for people 
to travel, there seems to be a growing need of road signs. 
A great many have been erected this year. Some 
have been torn down and some wilfully and maliciously 
destroyed. There is a large and beautiful mile-stone on 
the South Great Road at the corner of lands owned by 
Dr. Blodgett and Mr. Biggs. Tradition has it that this 
stone was originally part of a large boulder with a seam 
in it, on what was then the Morse place, now owned by 
Dr. Blodgett, and that Mr. Morse, Peter Underwood, 
Capt. Charles Wheeler, and James Farrar, with the aid 
of oxen, opened the seam and placed half of the stone in 
its present position. Time and frost have never moved 
it from its foundation. A sign was then painted on the 
stone reading Boston, 16 miles, Fitchburg 34 miles; with 
arrows showing the proper directions. As time went on 
the Morse place came into the possession of James H. 
Farrar. Very much to his distaste some one painted the 
whole face of the stone with a cheap advertisement. 
Acid and other means were employed to remove the 
disfigurement, but without success. Mr. Farrar then 
chiseled over the whole face of the stone, intending to 
have the original sign cut in, but was prevented by his 
untimely death. 

The old sign has been cut on the stone during the past 
year, and I see no reason why it will not serve as a land- 
mark for generations to come. 

The day before Thanksgiving the off horse of the big 



69 

team died. This horse had served the Town for nearly 
ten years, and although not sound was a good faithful 
worker, and would have been all right for a few years 
more. The horse I referred to in my last report did very 
well through the greater part of the year, but it will be 
necessary to hire or buy a new team with harnesses and 
probably a cart next spring. 

Respectfully yours, 

JOHN F. FARRAR. 

Superintendent of Streets. 



70 






O00CT> 
(NOrt< 



iO <© CN 






IS X 



<L> O _ C3 

fl-5 p| m fl M 

■■§S'-Sl'3SEg 

-^ "d -£ • ~ <-< & cj 
rc<! ^ 2V~ M S 



1-3 

03 •<] CO r* 03 

3 o£ S 5 "3 os 



o 

as 









8 

I 






HODOONOiONHOt 

TjHco-^oocNi-oeoo 

i-HO CN 



CO CO CN t* GO iO 



OOOTjH--lt^COTt<t> 

OOO^iOOiiOCOCN 
lOiOOHHiO CO 



la 

fljQ 



& 5 






.£ .co 35 ' 



g si 

. c3 d^ 3^ d 

- 3 ^ ^ ° w 

»3 Q rt 03 08 

a 

4, 01 

o > 






02 



! g d 

i 2 

i o^d 
> o 

u 



so 






JS 5 £ 



^o-f-gO 



h4 



4a a> 

U • 4^ 

a. s 

• .s 

Q 

s § ° 

CdcS 
08 p, bfl 
rj 0> CD 

-^ ^ S ro 

-%^ 



o d 
o o 
o o 

ic? 

08 c8 9 m^ 1 " m ' 4 - 1 

CD (15 M--- w ><! _ 



«4)flfl| 



o 3 

>, o 

F 1 * S 



d s >^_2 n 

-d8§S = - 

^08 o S c8,d 



o S d. 



io^ 



<b d£ o 
^ o o o 



<VrZ Si 
^ S 08-rt r N U, *SfS 

S'diS " ««« d"S a 
o3 rt ^,<»Srt£ogf 



71 



Report of the Commissioners of Sinking and 
Trust Funds. 



1911. 
Feb. 1, 



Oct. 24, 

Nov. 27, 

Dec. 8, 

" 11, 

1912. 

Jan. 22, 
Feb. 1, 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS. 

In Account with 

TOWN OF LINCOLN. 

Dr. 

Coupons, Illinois Steel 5s ... 
Coupons, New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s 
Coupons, Am. Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s 
Coupons, Boston & Albany R. R. 4s 
Coupons, Lake Shore & Mich. So. Ry. 4s 
Coupons, Pennsylvania R. R. Co. 33^s . 
Coupons, West End St. Ry. 4>^s . 
Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treas. ..." 
$3,000 Illinois Steel Co. 5s, 
$2,000 Boston & Albany R. R Co, 4s, 
$1,000 West End Street Railway Co. 4^a, 
$2,000 Lake Shore & Michigan Southern RR 

$1,000 Pennsylvania RR.Cvt. 3>£s, 

Interest 



Cr. 



4s, 



1911. 

Feb. 1, Balance 

1912 

Jan. 22, $6,000 Town of Lincoln Serial 4s 
" 22, $5,000 Town of Lincoln 4s 1936 



Feb. 1, 



Balance 



$150 00 

50 00 

80 00 

80 00 

80 00 

35 00 

45 00 

2,173 37 

3,038 61 

1,970 72 

1 ; 013 75 

1,874 78 

974 96 

53 89 

$11,620 08 



187 29 

6,103 77 
5,123 06 

105 96 
$11,620 08 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co.4s, due 1929. 

$1,000 New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s, due 1915. 

$6 ; 000 Town of Lincoln 4s, Serial Bonds due 1912 to 1923. 

$5,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1936. 

$1,500 Mortgage Note, Mary A. Buffum. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



72 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

FUND FOR EXTRA SCHOOL HOUSE BONDS 

1911. Dr. 

Dec. 22. Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer .... $3,000 00 
1912. 

Feb. 1. Interest 11 00 

Blanace . . . . . . . . . 62 83 

$3,073 83 

1911. Cr. 

Dec. 22. $3,000 Town of Lincoln 4s .... $3,073 83 

$3,073 83 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

$3,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1936. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



73 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

SPECIAL WATER WORKS SINKING FUND 

1911. Dr. 

June 5. Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer 

1912. 

Jan. 1. Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s 

Feb. 1. Interest . . .... ... 



1911. Cr. 

June 5. $2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s 

1912. 

Feb. 1. Balance .... 



$2,200 00 

40 00 
2 36 


$2,242 36 


$2,010 89 
231 47 


$2,242 36 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,0000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1917. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



1911. 
Feb. 



74 

TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 

Dr. 



Balance 

Dividends, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. 
Dividends, West End St. Ry. pfd. . 
Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 
Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co. j 
Coupons, Illinois Steel Co. 5s 
Rights, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Interest on deposit . . . ■ . 



$60 76 
64 00 
52 00 
64 00 
32 00 
25 00 
22 30 
3 42 

$323 48 



1912 Cr. 

Jan. 22. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account 



$240 42 
83 06 

$323 48 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co., preferred. 
8 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
$500 Illinois Steel Co. 5s, due 1913. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



75 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 

1911. Dr 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad Co 

Dividends, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. .... 
Interest on deposit 



1912. Cr. 

Jan. 22. Cash paid J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account, 



The Fund is invested as follows 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co., preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 



$33 02 
35 00 
16 00 

80 


$84 82 


$51 80 
33 02 


$84 82 



Respectfully submitted, 

C L. TODD, Treasurer. 



76 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account ivith 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT 
OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1911. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 4s. . 
Dividends, West End Street Railway, Common 
Interest 



1912. Cr. 

Jan. 22. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treas. Lincoln Library 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s, due 1929. 

2 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 



$7 25 
40 00 

7 00 

72 


$54 97 


47 72 
7 25 


$54 97 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



77 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN LIBRARY. 

1911. 
Feb. 1. Balance 



Coupons, Pennsylvania R. R. 3j^s 

Amer. Tel. & Tel. 4s 
Dividends, West End St. Ry. Co. Common 
Interest 



$19 40 

35 00 

40 00 

17 50 

2 05 


$113 95 


94 55 
19 40 


$113 95 



1912. Cr. 

Jan 22. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929 
$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Convertible 3^s, 1915. 

5 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer 



78 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT POOR. 



1911. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Coupons, Pennsylvania R.R. 33^s 

" American Tel. & Tel. Co . 4s 
Interest 



1911. Cr. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, income account 
Balance on deposit, principal account 



The Fund is invested as follows: 



$103 19 


35 00 


40 


00 


3 


99 


$182 


18 


137 


18 


45 00 


$182 


18 



$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Convertible 3}£s, due 1915. 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD. Treasurer. 



79 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN HEARSE 

1911. Dr 

Feb 1. Balance $85 24 

Dividend, Pennsylvania R. R. . 27 00 

Rights, Pennsylvania RR. Co. . . •.-. . 9 14 

Interest 3 09 

$124 47 



1911 Or. 

Dec. 12. 2 Shares Pennsylvania R. R. Co $123 25 

1912. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit 1 22 

$124 47 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

11 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 



Respectfully submitted 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer 



80 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 

1912. Dr. 

Jan. 22. Cash, from Chas. S. Wheeler, Treasurer . . . $1,000 00 



$1,000 00 



1912. . „ Or. 

Jan. 23. $1,000 Kalispell Water & Electric Co., 5s . . . $992 36 

Feb. 1. Balance, principal account 7 64 



$1,000 00 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 Kalispell Water & Electric Co., 5s, due 1912. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



81 

C. L. TODD, TREASURER 

In Account with 



1911. 
Feb. 1. 



1911 
Feb. 



Mar. 



Aug. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND. 

Dr. 

Balance $571 13 

Dividends, Pennsylvania Railroad . . . . 81 00 

" Boston & Providence R.R. ... 100 00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R 40 00 

Fitchburg R.R. pfd 50 00 

Old Colony R. R 70 00 

Boston & Albany 87 50 

Boston & Maine R.R 45 00 

American Tel. & Tel. Co 480 00 

Boston & Lowell R.R 240 00 

West End St. Ry. pfd 40 00 

Nor. Idaho & Mont. Power pfd. . . 250 00 

Coupons, Maine Central R.R., 4>£s . . .-••.. 270 00 

Rights Pennsylvania R.R. Co 26 40 

American Tel. & Tel. Co 360 00 

" Gain Am. Tel. stock Sold and Rights Bought 94 50 

Interest on deposit 14 81 



Cr. 

9. Edward L. Rogers, lecture . 

22. Boston Octette Co., concert . 

22. S. C. Rogers, lantern 

1. M. Sereque, printing . 

9. Hoiner B. Hulbut, lecture . 

23. J. Ernest Woodland, lecture 
3. S. C. Rogers, lantern . 

22. M. Sereque printing 

22. Japanese Lanterns 

22. L. E. Bagley, Labor, etc 

22. Boston Letter Carriers' Band, concert 

22. H. T. Wheeler, barge 

1. William Ferguson, stamps and advertising 
13. 4 shares Pennsylvania R.R. Co. , 

16. M. Sereque, printing 

2. The Barleben Trio, concert . 

18. Robert B. Glenn, lecture . . 

27. Arthur S. Riggs, lecture . 

11. Dodge Torello Co., concert . 

26. Marshall Darrach, reading . 



$2,820 34 



$75 00 
125 00 

10 00 
4 00 

42 00 
100 00 

10 00 

4 50 
1 40 
7 00 

112 00 
3 00 
3 08 

242 75 

5 50 
137 50 
100 00 

75 00 

125 00 

75 00 



82 



1912. 








Jan. 


4. 


P. F. Parker, cartoonist 


50 00 




17. 


George L. Cousins, barge 


15 00 




20. 


Powell Printing Co., printing 


6 00 




27. 


M. H. Doherty, carriages 


14 00 


Feb. 


1. 


Balance on deposit .... 


1,477 61 




$2,820 34 



This Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows: 

30 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
30 " Boston & Lowell R.R. Co. 
10 " Boston & Providence R.R. Co. 
10 " Boston & Albany R.R. Co. 
10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co., pfd. 
10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 
10 " West End St. Ry. Co. pfd. 
5 " New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R. Co. 
10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co., common. 
60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co., pfd. 
$5,000 Central Cross-Town R.R. Co., 5s, in liquidation. 
$6,000 Maine Central Railroad Co., 4Hs, due 1912. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer 



83 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 
Of the Town of Lincoln for the year ending Jan. 21, 191 2 

No epidemic of contagious diseases has occurred in 
the town during the past year. 

There have been reported to the Board: — lease of 
chicken pox, 1 case of measels, and 2 cases of tuberculois. 

No complaints have been received by the Board on 
account of nuisances. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARDS W. HERMAN. 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
MARTIN M. WELCH. 



84 



ASSESSORS REPORT. 

The Board of Assessors submit the following report : 



Number of residents assessed on 


property, 226 




' non- residents assessed on 


property 89 




' assessed on polls only, 


194 




' acres of land assessed, 


8,740 




' dwelling houses assessed, 


247J 




' horses assessed, 


345 




' cows assessed, 


707 




neat cattle other than cows assessed, 130 




' swine assessed, 


472 




' sheep assessed, 


3 


Value of land, exclusive of building 


58, $540,257 00 


" buildings, exclusive of land, 


811,015 00 


" real estate, 


$1,351,272 00 


" personal estate, 


2,248,954 00 


Total vaulation, 


$3,600,226 00 


State tax, 


$4,620 00 


County tax, 


2,949 74 


State highway tax, 


103 00 


Town grants, 


35,350 19 


Total, 


$43,022 93 



85 

Number of polls, 335 

Deduct part of corporation tax, $6,350 67 
Rate $10.00 per $1,000. 

Amount to be collected $36,672 26 

CHARLES S. WHEELER, 
WM. C. PEIRCE, 
WM. H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors. 



H es 



g° 



86 

oooooootooooootootooototo 

iOONkO(NiOiONOO^»ONOON»OOWO 



lr^ CO <N <M 

O to <M 



^(NCOOCOWHOOHOC^COO^OO 
Hi- i CD CONHCOO^ O 

rH CO HOQ 




o o o o o 

O O iO(NiO 



O CO 
CO 10 

CO 



<N rH 



O O tO o 
O O <N O 



HH<* 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

O O O <N tO 

CO CO rH CO 00 



o 
o 



o 



o o 

o o 

co~to~ 

CD 



o o o 

tO (M tO 

<M rH 



O O to o 

O O CM O 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

co'co'rH'co'oo" 



o 
o 
o 



o 

tO 

I> 

tO 



o 



o o 10 



^ (N 



to O O O to 

N ^ 10 N O 

t~^ rH 00 rH 

CO 



tO to o to to 
t^ O O <N o 

00 O (M 00 

CO 



i> t*-_ 


■O 


o 


O O to 


to o o o to 


iO o o tO to 




to 


<M 


OiON 


N^iONO 


t^ to O <M O 


° § ° tf 


t^ 


<N 


^H (N 


t^ rH 00 rH 


00 O <M 00 
















i> 


(N 




rH rJH 


rH H cq 


tO 


OQ 




CO 


CO 




J—{ 






r-i 





CD W 



CD *-H 



r> - bjo<; 






^ a o3 



m m m 



S S S CD CD 
c3 c3 o3 J^ ^ 
^^^ o3 o3 

<<^<!pqpq 



CD CD 
MM 
o3 o3 

PQpq 



§1 

o3 o3 

pqpq 



§H 



CD rt 

jh o 

CD _H 



o 



.S :^w 



o3^ 



CD 03 «H 



02 02 
CD CD 

03 o3 



^<| ^ r £ 0Q £ £ -^ 
v^ ^ ~C/J rD CD 02 

&* --.a - «r So S^ g 

03 CD CD CD .^^h M O O 

pq pq pq pq pq pq pq pq pq 






87 



OOOOOOOOOOiOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

»0O^i0OOi0i0i0C0^OOO>0(NOi0O05OOi0HO 



HMcooooHcoocomo^o^ 

Oi^CO^HCOrHTt<rHO^O}tO 



iCWNON^O^COCO 
(N COO(NCON ^t 1 <M 

co" 



ooo o ooooooo o o 

ooo O to o © o o o o o o 

CO to © i-H o co o to o o to to to 

iC^ t^ H^^iOcD(N W Ol CO 



o 
o 



tO 

CO 



ooo 

to o o 



TtH 00 O 

CO <M 



ooo o ooooooo o o 

ooo O to o o o o o o o o 

CO ^O rH O COO^iO^O^O^^ »o to 

»o"ic ^ i-r r^^r^ccr of co~ of co~ 



o 
o 

tO^ 

co" 



ooo 
tO o o 

"* °° ^ 

CO of 



o 


ooo 


o 


oo»oooooooooo 


o 


o 


tO 


T^lOO 


iOWH0050iOMO«000 


o 




r-4 


HOOO 


CO 
CO 


CO CO iO tH o> C^(NON 


o 


to 




H(NW 


00 rH ON 


I> 






T— 1 


^ OQ Ol 












CO 






o 


ooo 


o 


OOtOOOOOOOOOO 


o 


o 


IO 


^iCO 


to 


lOCO^OOOiOMO^OQ 


o 


rH 




HOOO 


CO 


CO CO to tH Ci (NC^ON 


o 


to 
















rH 03 CO 


CO 


00 rH 0(N 


r^ 






T-4 




^ Ol OJ 

CO 







t3<; o 

?H S-i 

o3^ 



£ 

T3 


08 


W 


W 


QC 


->- 






<i' 


s>> > 


fH 


<V 


a; 


+J 








T3 T5 T5 


<tf 


o8 


C^ 


JH 


u* 


lH 


WWW 



a^ 
a? a? 
02 *d 

° 9 

d^ 
9 bJO 

WW 



IIS 

o 
p 

WWW 



2r4 



co 

bJO bL' 

bJO bJO 



OJ 



% <3 c$ 

www 
OOO 

ooo 

P — i ? — i S=— i 

WWW 



hjrj bJDpH 1 O 

d d • „ - 

£ £ 1-3 

o o >> S 

Fh Fh *H P 

WWWW 



J, a 

<3 



d 
o3 

03 

d 



-. w 

rd ~ ~X\ 

d^dnd o 

?H CO CO -H> 

d d d d 



§H d 
^ a 

m m s 

CO CO 2 
<D CD rd 

bJO bf) d 

?H *H H 

WWWP: 



IS 

-t- 3 ^H 

d c8 

WO 



88 



X 


oooooooooooo>oooo*ocooooo 




tOOOOtOtOOOOOOOCNOOiOCMr- 


O O to o 


^§ 3 


OiOOONOOiOiC"^iOH0505»OHOiO 


00 to CO o 


Cas 
Pers 
and 
1 Es 


r-HQOH^cO^COCNr- 




^ CD CO C 


r- 


rH H^ 












CD 






Total 
on 

Rea 


















o5 ts 


o o o 




o o o 


ooooooooo 


o o o o 


* I 


o o o 




tO o o 


ooooooooo 


o o o o 


«§£ 


coioo 




1> iO iO 


HHiO©©rH©tOtO© 


00 iO (N O 


,2 S 


t^ TjH 




HJ CO <M 




"tf CD CO CO C 


r- 


rH tH 


H « 












to 






CD ^ 


o o o 




o o o 


ooooooooo 


o o o o 


"oS O^ 


o o o 




to © o 


ooooooooo 


o o o o 




CD iO O 




I> uo tO 


^HtOOOi-HO^OtOO 


00 to CM O 














m|„ 


b- H^ 




^f CO <M 




TH C£ 


H 


rH -<H 














to 






o 


1 

o o 


o 


o o 






oo*ooootoco 




o 




to o 


o 


*o o 






©©(M©©tO(MrH 




*o 




TjH O 


o 


CO to 






rH O 00 tO CD tO tO 




r-i 


aS O cS 
r° ° 


T— 1 


CO 








T-< 






■So 2.2 


o o 


o 


o o 






OOtOOOOtOCO 




O 




lO o 


r~) 


iO o 






00(MOOtO(NrH 




tO 


£ D £ ™ 


Th o 


(T3 


CO to 






r~i © 00 to CD to to 




rH 


Ml3 SH 
*>Ph 


rH 


CO 


rH 






rH 
rH 








gnj : 

•» CD ~ 

.9 pv* 

5 a & 




. . o • 

' m q 

: : sJoq 

: : ^ 


u 






























• 








. 




. 


pH 




a 

8 


z6 

CO 

q 




cu 

CD 


CD 


: • :h*|§ : d -g 

Htd all IffiSi 


GO 

a _q h 


tn a o q a 

>» q 0) cu g 

s.9.9.jeT.s s 

P_ Dh Dh Ph Ph 


q 

CD 

CO 

q 

o3 

02 


-3 o --S _q ^^ ^ _r _r jt^ 
r^^qqqq^^-^-^-So^ 




08 


Cj Cj Cj Cj 


*J 


S3 


qosos^qqoG 
JSooooooo 


*H 


?h -4-s q 




08 C^^^^^^^rTj 


o 


OOP 




ooooooooooouoooooooooo 



89 



OiOiOOOOiOOOOiO^OOOOiOOOOiOiOOOOOO 
^N^OOOiOOOONN^OONiOOO(Mh0500i005 



H^00O^Ni0OOONC0HNOi0^00(NOO05^H 
O "tf *0 CO (M Tji (M iO (M iO H CO rH O CO «5 h C^(N 



O 



OOOOOOOO 

00000*000 



OOiOOO^IMHO 
CO(N^CO <N CO <M 



oooooooooooo oo 

00*0000000000 oo 

O^NONOOC0 00(NC0»0 O H 

CSlT^rHCq rH O CO ^F rH <M <M 

CO 



O 

to 



o 



OOOOOOOO 
00000*000 

co cnT tjT co~ c<f co" <n" 



oooooooooooo 

00*0000000000 
O^l^iO^ O^O^CO 00 C^C0^*O^ 

C*"*r-Tc<f t-Tco" CO^Tjir-T 

CO 



o o 
o o 

O H 



o 

o 



<M <M rH 



O lO *0 


O KQ 


o 


LQ iO o 


*o o 


iCiOOO 


o o 


tH J><N 


O *0 


o 


I> <N ^ 


CN *0 


(MNO© 


*0 Tfl 


CO O 00 


*0 Tj< 


o 


(M CO CO 


*0 rH 


1> O Th 




(NHH 


rH 


*0 


T— 1 O 

CO 


CO 






OiOiO 


o *o 


o 


iO»00 


LO O 


iCiCOO 


o o 


^H t^ CQ 


o 53 


o 


t^ <M ^ 


CM IC 


(NNOCO 


AC Tt< 


CO O 00 


IO T*H 


o 


(M CO CO 


iO rH 


t^ a> hh 


















<N rH rH 




iO 

55 


i—i o 
CO 


CO 







ui\-2 



H2 



o;0 



Fred 
Haro 

Geor 


<d 

02 
02 
d 


^ 




^ 


Ph 


02 


o? 


r// 




d 


d 


q 


j< 








r-^ 


C/J 


02 


02 


Q 


3 


d 


d 


n 


O 


o 


o 


H 



w 



£ O (H 

rt o 9 

> el a 

§ 9 a 

h d d 



<d d 
bfi'cD 

o ^ 



fl 9 I 

JUfifl 



d 

^^ 

a > a 

Hf d o 

of g^ 

C3~ CD CD 

fiQQ 



02 (-3 
e*H *rrt cc 

02^7^ 

^ i— T ^ 

*£ CD ,-d _£3 

hT5 gOo 
CD'^.2.^ 

- 9 a d 

CD CD CD CD 

Pflflfi 



Q 

d " o 

03 d 

"-2 M S 

§ CD^S 
d bJO 03 

.a o § 



^^Jr2 

^^_g d . ~ 

pH rH rg I CD r] f 

CD cd b£) b£ g Jh 

r^^l d b5r2 

o o o d 03 rd 
flfiQQWW 



90 



o 
H 



OOO^OiOOOOOOr-HOOOOOrHOOOOO 

r^t^oo»oooioo»ooioai^Hooooo 



o»oo 



OO WCOCO N(NCOhh(NhOhiO hNC^h 

t-H t-H t— I t— Ir- 1 H 00 05 t— I 





ooooooooooooooo 




o o o o o 




OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 




o o o o o 


0>C^050»OMO»0»CNOO»00 




HNOiON 


O V 


o o 


NNCO 


lOMCO^HiM 


t-H LQ 




H^(NH 


Fh tf 


H i—l 




T— 1 


T— 1 


rt 






S^S 


ooooooooooooooo 




o o o o o 


« O =3 


ooooooooooooooo 




o o o o o 


•Si 


o *o^ o_o o co p^iq_iONO^o_wq 




r-H |> 0^»0 t>- 


o~o~ 


MIMCO 


iOM W^HC^I 


t-H LO 




T-T^c^r-r 


bd o3"3 


T— 1 1— 1 








t-H 






SB 

c3 


o o 


LO IC 


^_^ 


rH O O 


o o 


T-H 


o o 




o o 


t^ r^ 


iO 


lOOiO 


10 05^ 


o o 




Th ^ 


o 


Gi 


CO Tp IC 


iO tH 05 


O <M 


03 O d 




T-H 


(M 


r^ 


T-H r-H 


O 


CO 


O o 








o^ 


oo a 


T-H 


o 

P-. 








r-T 








0«M 


o o 


O LO 


o 


t-H O O 


o o 


T-H 


o o 


« 0- eij <u 


o o 


t^ l> 


iO 


lOOO 


lij©^ 


o o 


«2§s 


^ TH 


o^ 


o 


CO ^* lO 


kO ^ o 


O <N 


h,_ m +» 




















T— ( 


ca 


!>. 


T-H T-H 


o 


CO 








o 


00 a 


T-H 










t-H 









si 

*4 

cd c3 
HPh 



h 



3 

•-5 



cd cd " 






tJ B 



m 

C ~ o 

c3 b£ £ 

n-* h hTPh g w 

g g g ^'c +3 

b ■ e s « 



* g 



HSO 



o 

HH> CO 

^ a s ^ 
^^^ el 



CD CD 
CD CD 

02 02 



# CD # CD ^CD p^ 



C3 

<a 

CD r-^ 



°^ 



^ 



c3 c3 o5 .ph i—i ^—i 

^ pH r^H PH P=H r^H 



eg bC . a 

^ CD ^ ^ 

02 > C 73 

^ g ^ 



7Z 



G Cj 



rt fl a ^ 
rt s rt 2 

>5 ^ >> 



r ..- .cTJ C fi^^'-H' - 



.3 O >^ 






CD CD CD «2 

-PH>"P ^ 

c5 c3 c3 



91 



OiOOOOMOOiO>OOOiOOiO»OiOOOOOOOO 

ifliOOHOMOONNOH»OiO>ONiOOOOOO»0^ 

NCOHCOiOCOONGOiOOOCON^COHMH^iOHTttGOO 
LO © ^F CO t^ CO »0 i— i(N iO O CO CO (M CO GO h CN i— i 



O O O O O 

*o o o o o 



NOCOOO 

lOOHHN 



oooooo^oooooooooooo 
oooooo»oooooooooo>oo 

C(M»OO00H^(NG0OHi0^i0O^00O 
LO H(N HiOCOMtNCONH CN rt 



o o o o o 
lO © o o © 
r^©^©^©^ 

lo" ©~ i— T r-Ti> 



oooooo^oooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOiOO 

O(NtOO00H^M00OHiC^iOO^00O 



LC 



h cq 



HiOC0(N(MC0NH 



M 



lo © © 


CO 
CO 


lO iO 


© © © LO LO LO © • 
rH © LO LO Cq LO © 


© 
© 


© 


© iC CO 

cq cq 


CO 
CO 


CO *o 


(N CO M 00 h (M CO 

©^ 


rH 




iO © © 
LO © i— 1 
© LO CO 


CO 
CO 
CO 


LO LO 
IT- CN 

CO *o 


© © © LO LO LO © 

HOiOiON»00 
<N CO CM 00 i-H CM © 


© 
© 

1— 1 


© 


(N <M 


CO 




© 

rH 







Ph 



^£ 



o 



r/j 



O 03 
^-5 



*>o 



• CD 

OO d 



<D CD 'O 

b b °3 

O O ^H 

CD CD O 

OO 1 

ffi M 0j 
CD CD rt 

T3 T3 «G 

O O O 

W W W W W hh W 



1f£ d a 

d ^ cd C3 

03 03 TO CD 



£ 03 

03 *Zl 

o3 



Ph 



•^ 



C3 

CD 

O O 

WW 



CD 


m 


rP 


o 


Ph 


s 


p— < 


r^ 


N 


r-3 


u 


fl 


O) 


o 



OQ.S 
Ph h 



S_j ^ _^ -»— 

J-\ xn P -p 

WW 



03 P 
O 

cc O 

CD 02 

P d 
^^ 

03 O 



d 
rd 

d CD h-s 

CD 



CD 
rd 



HH CD 
^H- 

^^-5 CD 

O cj^ 

Jh S3 03 



HH 



O O 



^>*-Z*-Z 



d 5 Eg 

r^H ^ r2; 

Ph cs 

d fl O 
o o . 
d'fl -e 
d d d 

(Dj-j^r^ososcDCDd 



r^.r^g^^:^ 



■H d cd - 






IMZWA'M 



92 



^00000000000*00000000000 

r^ooooooo*o<MeNr^oo*oooor^*ooo 



-c o 


» 


COCCOh 


WWOOCON^(NO^OOiOH 


O CO t-H 


T—I IQ 


i E 


gw 


t-h <M t-h <N 


T* r-l 


t-h rJH CD 


CO i-H O 


O T—I 


CO o 


L^ 


*- 








^ 






"a a 


V 














K 


c 


o o o o 


o o 


o o o 


o o o 


o o o o o 


H 


■p 


o o o o 


o o 


o o o 


o o o 


o o *o o o 


lo® 


O i-l O T-H 


O CD 


CO I> O 


O (N O 


CO o 


iO *0 





1 

£ 


H C^J t-H CN 


Ttf 1—1 


H CO CD 


CO 


O T—I 


CM O 


vISS 


o o o o 


O O 


O O O 


o o o 


o o o o o 


* „-8 


o o o o 


o o 


o o o 


o o o 


0*000 


£ = a 


CD r-i O i— i 


O CD 


co i> o 


O <N O 


CO o 


iO *o 
















Bra 


i-H <M t-H (N 


rf t— I 


t—i CO CD 


CCHiO 


O T— 1 


cn o 


< 


JS 








CO 







I 


*0 o 


o o o 


000*000000 


o 


o 


* -3 


t- o 


o o o 


lOW^NOOiOOO 


t^ 


o 


fl — 


CN 


(N(NO0 


NH1OO5H00CCHCO 


T-l 


CD 


« ° 5 






r^ 






o o 
H £ 






r-H 






Ph 













*o O OOO 0*000000 

t^ o . ooo *o cm cq t^ o o *o o o 

CM (NCQOO NHIOO5H0000HCO 



o 



o 
o 

CD 



Q^ 



CD * 



fl3 S d 

! fl CD 03 o 

o h 

^ CD cp „ 
-s eg P-n *H 

I I'll 

H ^ ej c3 



c3 ^ 

CD ■—' 



< 



PQ^ 



;s 



l l; w w vsj 



c3 CD 



o 
#2 



CD 


fl 






— 





_c 





— 






c 


X 


zn 


Fh 


o 


— 


fl 


O 


03 



«1 8 § 



7Z 






d Oflfl 

O 



. : . <» 



•oo 



-d 



WW 



r3££ 






Sh O CD CD £ 
CQ bCbCfa£d 
- co c3 o3 CD 
OOPhPhP-i 



CD CD CD 
O CD O 

fl -fl -fl 
'CD *<3 '53 

Ph PhPh 



o o co o 

LO iO iO o 



93 

0©»00©©©OOOOOt^©©00*0©^H 

OO^MOCOOiOOOQMOO^iOHOOJ 



iCO r-H 00^0000^*0 
CO CO OHl>H(MiCiC 

N HCOH 



H(M(NIOCCOOCOCO^CO 

(NHOKNHGOHHICO 
r-H CO r-H r- 1 



o 




o 


o o o o o 




c 




o 


o o o o o 


o 




o 


o o o o o 




c 




o 


o o o o o 


o 




o 


o o o *o o 




^ 




o 


ooo»cic 


T-H 




tO 


OOJ^hM 

1—1 1-H 




lO 




<N 


T-H tO T-H T-H tHH 

<M r-H 


o 




o 


o o o o o 




o 




o 


o o o o o 


o 




o 


o o o o o 




- 




o 


o o o o o 


o 




o 


O O O iO o 




rfi 




o 


OOOiOC 




















i— r 




*0 


OO^HIM 

T— 1 T-H 




iO 




<N 


t-H tO r-H r-H TJH 
<N r-H 


O O CD 


o 


OiCO 


O 




OOOOOt^OOOOiOOr-H 


lOiOiO 


o 


O ^H CO 


O 




O iC 


OOOCOOO^*Ot-hOO 


T— 1 


LO O 


r-H 


O ^ CO 


o 




iO 


i— i (N (M "O CO O O r- i OS CO 




CD 


00 


<M CO 

T-H T— 1 


i-O 






T-H 


Oi <N O CO CD 

xJH r-H 


O O CD 


o 


OOO 


c 




OOOOOt^OOOO*OOr-H 


iQiOiO 


o 


O ^ CO 


5 




OiCOOOCOOOTtHCHO® 


r-H 


»o o 


1—4 


O ^H CO 


O 




MO 


H(M(NkCWOC r-iQiCO 






















CD 


00 


<N CO 


*C 






T-H 


OMOCO CD 

TjH r-H 



Ph 

' o3 
o . 

PhP-< 



o 





r 


r3 




n 


w 


h 


^ 




o 


0) 


o 


o 


Ch 


p-l 


QJ 


0) 



rH Q} 
£) 2 c3 

~I-fH 
HH fl 'a) 

^1 

3 o 

T^H rH 



O 
■+3 

03 
-H-3 

g <p.S 



S Ph H Ph PL, tf # 



o 

It* 

o3 t/i 

~ o3 
w {J 
£ J£ 



c 



03 ?h 

bJO c3 

03 Oj o 
O O O 

PhPhPh 



H-3 

^< 

p5 C3 Ci) 

a> P « 
faJD o Ph 
o o o 

PhPhPh 



**! 



O J 



£a®Z • -^ g> 

"£ Ph >^> >> ^ o3 os--; 

5 s * a s §o i 

Dh Oh D, Ph o3 o3 W).p 

OOOOr>>r>^bfe 



aT aT aT cq 



94 



i 







i iQt>iQO*oooooiQOOOO*QOOOOOa IOC 

>eot-^^i— 'iec:oc:cco>eieo:coc:c:c:>e:/:<e 

a0(0N>0H(0C9HHONNH^00t0>0 00^0)>0CQ 

\ y-< CC C<1 — CN CM — >C -T DC O N C ^ O — 



pi 



H C H 



I 



c i * c ic m - r. n c<! t-: - Tji c c l-: x 




'3 H3O«5NH0iNN>OHTj<O>J0»00C O 



MXM 



CI 



X M i^ M 



lO N »C C iC C 
o o t^ ^r i-* *0 



GC CO — 

I rH CC 



re 



o 


te- 


^^ 


LC 


o 


gj 


IG 


, . 


o 


CO 


>-C 


0<I 


a 


*C 


X 


kC 


el 


re 


CQ 


00 


CQ 


PC 


t-C 


re 



IN 



^ n l* c l: c 

L't C N rf - c 
ggoj OO^C0tH i-l H 



ct 



Q 


to 


fcO 


03 


cq 


00 



CC 



->o 



N 


uC 


i_e 


o 

re 




CC 
CQ 




~" 



- 



a 



c3 * 
-^ ;- 



«!f? 



HW 



~> H 



i--c. 



o 

72 c 



o c 
'SI "C 



<- 



.£ n: b3 n ^ 

~ - r ' - "~ ^ • - — r - ~ to d z £ * 

•- ^' ^ v • ^ rya _£ -^ '>3r-"'"-"^ 



. = n^ >.£• = .= < 

g - fl o U U U : fc jjj b£ , £ 



-T r? ,-T J 1 ^ rT C ~ C 



_T fl n c o 

oj d cj oj 

I E I I E r 

& ffl B ° ° x B § ffl z'S'E'E'z'E'E 2 2 § 

aQOQ^aQaQQQODOQOQSQQaQQQQQOQOQaQOQaQ 



95 

OOOOOOtPOOOOOOOOOOOOGOOOCMCOO 
cOOO^OiOt^*OOO^O^HOiOOOOOOOO<000 

00OO»0^Hm(NOCWC0COHNHOiO^OL0C0O»0 
NOOCDN GO (M LO CD CO NN O H (N O ^O GO Tt< H CO 

i— It— I CO i— I ^* tO CM t-H CM 



o o 




o o 


o oooooooooooo o 


o o 




o o 


O O O O to o o o o o o o o o 


tO o 




^ GO 


O lO lO CO H LQ r- I0»0t00t01>- to 


Th GO 




CO 


O CM CO 


O tH CM CO CM GO 


CM CO 


T— 1 




T— 1 


CM 




T— 1 


o o 




o o 


o oooooooooooo o 


o o 




o o 


O OOOtOOOOOOOOO o 


to o 




rh GO 


O to to CO 


hiOhO'OiOO'ON to 














tH go 




CO 


O (M CO 


O t-h C^ CO CM GO 


CM CO 


t-H 






CM 




T-H 


o 


o o 


o^oooooo 


O GO 


CM CO 


CD 


O Tt< 


tOt^tOOO^Or^ 


O • CO 


CO O 


CO 


O to 


COCO(NOC(NHiO 


t^ o 


CO CO 


CO 


CO t^ 


t— i C^ to CO CO 


co cm 


T-H T-H 




T-H 


(N T-H 


CM to 




CM 


o 


o o 


o-^oooooo 


O GO 


CM CO 


CO 


O ^CH 


ior^tooo^OT-H 


O CO 


CO O 


co 


o to 


COCONOONHiO 


t^ o 


CO CO 














co~ 


CO t^ 


t-h cq to co co 


CO CM 


t-H t-H 




T— I 


CM t-H 


CM to 


T— 1 


CM 



00 

s 



6od 

o3 o3 



^Qp5pG 
o -+^ -+^ 

% g § s 

fl O -4-3 S-3 

mmmm 



CD 

+^< 

DQ 

- 

fH 

H 

r^ ^ ^ ^ 



- 3-S 
3 o o « 

^§§^ 

03 fH FH *~ 

CD O O £ 

+3 +3 -4-3 £> 

mmmm 






-I 



CD CD 

pH pH 

o3 o3 



pH P I 

ri coffin 
» ^ Ph ^ p 

53 cu ? 



a 



m 



u 

G _£ £G CD CD 

2 ^ ^ o ^o 
bi)^ 1^ T3 7^ 

O 03 2 2 5 

£ CO pG pC pG 






<io 



^OOO 



8.SJ 

HHHHH^r^^^^r^r^r^t^r^ 



O CD S^^^ 
►^"T^ o3 o3 o3 CD 



~ ~ pH Sh pH Sh 
P q CD CD CD CD 

00 to CD CD CD CD 

CD CD pG pG pG pG 



96 



■° £ 
o 



iOOOOOOOO 
NWINOOOiQiO 






CD <N I>- t- 

(NO h 



o o o 

OiOO 



5 °_ I *0 CO tH 

H OS 



O O O O 

OOiOiO 

*C O b- b- 
(M lO 



O O O 
OiOO 
lO CD 



(M TjH 



^ 



O O O O 
OOiOiO 





iO o o o o o 


o 


3 1 


t^ 00 <N O O O 


o 


Eh S 


CO 




iON t— I i—i <N 


o 


c« O 33 


^H IC 


r— ' 


-^ o 






h i 






& 

& 







iO o ■ © o o o 

l> 00 (N O O O 

i— i to 



o 
o 
o 



bJO O 



a g 
JS 00 

CD CD CD ^~ CD 

13 'S ^ ^ 13 
CD CD CD ^ CD 



CD £ 
CD bJO g 



^ 



r^ .'Th ^ 



£££!£££!££ 



97 



EM*-a 



£° 



OOOr-itQOOOOOOOOOOiOOOOOO 

^OONHW^»0(N^i0i0OOON»0OOOi0 



(NiOOHiO 



CM CD 



Or- i i-h iO O CO i-h t— lOONGO 
t-h TtH CO CM CD 



© O © h 
I TJH O O b- 

NiOOH 



oooooooooooooooo 

CO^iOCN^^OiOOOOt^iOOOOO 



(M CD 



Ot— li-HLQOCOT-HrHOOt^t^ 

1-1 ^ CO (M CD 



CO 

w 

X 

w 

Q 

CO 

O 






© © © t-h 
rt< O O l> 

(M iO O t-h 



OOOOOOOOOOiOOOOOO 

CO^^^^iOLOOOOMOOOOO 

CM CD Or-HT-HLOOCOT-Hr-HOOt^t^ 



rH CO 



CM CD 



H w 



»o 



CM 



o 






T— I 

of 



o 



03 

O 

d CO 

<3 CD 
^ e! 



M 

rH O 

t r o 

CO - 
f-i CD 

'§" 

rd CO 

S— - 

CD T3 
rj CD 

GO 



03 ~ 



DQ 



03 5 
^ d 



rd 

CD O 

PPPQ 



11 

CO d d 

O O ^ 

pqoj* 

CD ° r> 

2 .fa : 

P CD O 



. d 

. o 

en >"^ 



£ 03 CO 

^ d^ 

T3 d o 

03 CD O 

*h ^ U 

PQPQPQ 



d ^ 

d CO 

r cd ?h 

Safe 

CO rd -h* 

o d £ 
o o o 

^H ^H ^ 

pqpQPQ 



d 
o 

+3 



■d o 



cd £h rd r ^ 



d 

o 
+^ 

CO 

O 

pq 



do ~ co 



CD 



5U k" ^ - CD 
CD tn O fa d 

OOO" 



>^ d 



If* 

o r cd 

^ CD 

d fl ^ 
.§£?! 

d d^ 
OOP 



O CD S 

'¥J. 

la's 

o3 ^ ?h 

• - P^-d 
• 2 °^ 

^S CD r>i 

go a 

03 ^ 

a » ^ 

^ d >, 

CD O O 

QQQ 



98 



•So « 

« £t3W 
O a) C — 
— (^ d ea 

o o ^ 



O(NOOOO»0OOOOO*0OOOOOOOOO 
0*OOCOOOCOCOO*OOOcOOOOOOcDiOlOO 

OS 
^(McO(NH OhO Ot— lOOr-iOlr^OOi-HC^OO 
CO i— i 00 i— I H^ CN r- 1 l> i— i 



05 



(N 



CO 



(NOOOOOOOO 
*OOOOOOCOO*0 

(NOOHO(MHO 
00 CD CO 



o ooooooooo 

O O O O O O CO *o iO o 

rH rHOt^OO^(MCOO 

rH tH <N rH lOH 







(MOOOOOOOO 




o 




ooooooooo 


a c -5 




*oooooocoo»o 




o 




OOOOOCOtQiOO 


MO K 

id 3^ 




CM CO CO rH O (M rH 


o 




rH 




r- 1 O t^ O O rH 


(NCDO 




















fcclS — 




00 CO 


CO 








rH H/l CM rH . 


lO rH 








<M 










to 




o 


O kO 




o 




iO 




o 


* » 


o 


CO CO 




o 




CO 




o 


H w 


















fl "S 


<* 


CO t^ 




o 




00 




^ 


"3 fl 








rH 




00 




T— 1 


O m 












r-i 




r—^ 


— ■ - 




































S"-* 


o 


o *° 

CO g 
CO l> 




o 




iO 




O 


|°c^ 


o 




o 




CO 




O 


g>o o a 


^ 




o 




00 




"tf 


t-Jl Eln 


















SS^^H 








r— 1 




00 




H 


M>Ph w 












i-i 







• O 

• o 

• £ 

• o 

O CO 

. o o 



flr 2 

h^> O 

CO O 

o £ 
CQ O 






I of fl 

bC O 



.y rH ^H 

Jh 0) 



•rH C3 

PhPh 



o 

H-3 

bJD 

C rH 

6< 8 



;°S 



■ &«£ 

,jO „Ph 



rH CO 

ph O "_-J 

J § J 

CO O rJ 

§11 



CO _-> 

bJD O 

o o 



J rH 

rg O 
r-j H 

<J g 

rH 

oh 

cT co" 

§1 



a 

o 

rH 

HH 

c3 



<3 

rH^ 

CO 

G '3 

rd 9 

Oh. 



rH 

• o 

• o 

• £ 

• o 



2^g 



o 






.S 9 

200W 



co r ^ 53 r >< 

J fl .. ^ flM 

^S _rf-7 -^ rH 

"qj 2 ri S 22O 



99 



OOOOOOO^H 

OOOOOLQLO^H 

CO O *0 CO t^ l>» 
CO CN 



O O O O 
O O O O 



0^*000*00000000 

^i-H^HO^OXNOOOt^OOO 



00 H t-H 



(M rH (M ^H CO 00 
t-h CM CO 



O O O 

OQ ^ T-H 



O O O O O O 

o o o o o *o 



000000*0 0000000000 

oooo*oorHO*ooooor^ooo 



CO O *0 CO <N l> 
CO <M 

• 


O CO CM O 00 *0 (Mh^t^OiO ooo 
t^ t-h O CM CO CM t* t-h 


o o o o o o 

0*0 
CO O iO CO (N t^ 


oooooolooooooooooo 

0000*OOt-hOiOOOOOI^OOO 
O CO CM O 00 *0 (NHiO^OiO OOO 



CO CM 



O CM 



CO 



CM ^ T-H 



O ^ O 



to 

CM 



CO 



o ^ o 


^ 


IO 


o 


LO TJH O 


T-H 


CM 


o 


l> o 


1> 


t^ 


CO 


T-H 









c3 

^3 . — i CD 



o O 



03 

r^ O 
CD O 



HH CD ^ 
CD +-> 2 



HH 1 
O 



^ O 

rO 

« : 
cdW 



o 

r_H -(-3 O 

' ~ o3 CD 






CD CD 

'rl rH 

c o 

o o 



PI 

o 

Pj 

"H 

HH rH 

o • • 

**H <+J O ^ 

O TS Q th 

CD ^ O 

m .S CD ^3 

^ CD -f_j CD 

. O CD H . 

- cd - c! r 

^ §'> ^ "S 

^ ^ CD CD O 



CD . 

bD - 

£ o 

+-? fl bX) bJO 



r ' rH 

p;^ 



PI 
o 

■e a 

CD o3 

-4-5 



Pi ^ 

o 



o 



a PI 



o 

bJD ^ fin 



CD PI 
bX) c3 

rH rH 



5H CO CO 

^ CD CD -f^ CO 

^ bJO bJO O co 

O O O 3 



Cj 



^P^P^PhPhPh 



g & 5 5 

mmmm 



Pl°^r-^ 

03 >> - 



100 



X 


00000000 »o OOOOOOO »-0 


C3 


00O00OOOO»OcMO»-0OOOOO(M(N 


x§ | 


iO 1—1 


lOHOCOHOOMOOOM^OOCON 


S £-oK 


O 


CO CM ^ r- 


< CM (M r-H CD 




ca 


CO 


r " H 




T-H 






a) 

03 * 


000000000 


000000*0© 


- gw 

03 © 


000000000*00 


*00©©©©CM© 


O t— i iO t— i cD t— iO 


OOOW^OOCOiO 


2 1 


O 


CO CM O 


cm CM h CD 


*- tf 


T-T 


CO 


T-H 




000000000 


© © © © © »o © 


■S ^ 


OOOOOOOOOiOO 


©©©©©©CM© 


lis 


O^rH 


LO r— 1 O CD r— 1 O 


iflON^OOMW 






00 <N 0<Tt-T cd" 




0" 


CO (M O 


l>J 


<M 

T-H 


CO 


T-H 



~c3 





10 c 


> 







CM C 


» CM 




10 


00 CO <M 




CO 


TH t- 




P4 








|o1. 





iO c 





&»9« 


©' 


CM O 


CM 


Aggrej 

Valu 

Perse 

Est 


CO 


00 c<: 


I ™ 






• P 


CD 




. . TJ 


. pD -2 • 


. . . 60 - . . . 


a 
"3 


. rH 




: : p 

. 

! § £ 

1* CQ -P 

§ § <3 

TO Oj fl 


-fee 8 •■£ ■• 
:£.£ : or : 

g-SH^ £^ c 




• • r "2-S • • • 

• -^o • • • 

: gi"s -go 

O <fl CD ^ ^ - CQ 

^ pd • 03 • CD 

CD CD CD !1h ^ ^_rj 


d 





a 

c3 


HH M 02 g ir-J c 


p 

c 
H 

p 




s . 

CD O O 


CD P pH CQ H^ H -£ 


^ (D O.Th.h O 

CD ,P rP rP rP .P .P O 






£ 


fct&ept&t^pt 



101 



WATER COMMISSIONERS REPORT 

The Water Commissioners herewith present their 
annual report. At the last annual meeting it was voted 
to make extensions of the water pipe as follows : 

From the corner near Lorenzo Brooks to opposite the 
residence of Eugene Jose; from opposite the Mayer place 
to opposite the residence of David Farquhar, and from 
the terminus opposite the Flynn estate to opposite the 
house owned by the City of Cambridge. 

The Jose extension as those heretofore made was on a 
5 % guarantee for 5 years. The Farquhar extension on a 
7% guarantee for 5 years, and the Cambridge extension 
on a permanent guarantee of 7 % of cost of construction. 

The cost of these three extensions was as follows: 



Jose Extension 


- 


Pipe, 


$581 99 


Hydrant, 


24 66 


Gate, 


7 60 


Horse Hire, 


4 65 


Digging and Laying 2,265 feet at 28 cents, 


538 44 


138| yards at $3.00, 


415 50 


Setting Hydrant, 


2 00 


Teaming, 


38 40 



$1,593 24 



102 
Cambridge Extension 



Hydrant, 

Gate, 

Freight, 

1,923 feet pipe at 28 cents, 

154J yards Rock at $3.00, 

Hydrant, 

Pipe, 



Farquhar Extension 



Pipe, 
Hydrant, 
Freight, 
4 Gates, 



1,181 cubic feet at 28 cents, 
19J yards Rock at $3.00, 
One Hydrant 
Teaming, 



$24 66 


7 60 


80 11 


538 44 


463 50 


2 00 


480 75 


$1,597 06 


$295 25 


24 66 


22 04 


18 78 


7 60 


15 20 


330 68 


58 50 


2 00 


19 20 



$793 91 



The contract for this work as well as the teaming of the 
pipe was awarded to Cunningham Bros., the lowest bidder 
at 28 cents per lineal foot; $3.00 per cubic yard for rock 
excavation and $2.00 each for Hydrants. All of the 
work was done under the direction of the Superintendent. 

There is due Cunningham Bros, on account of this 
work 10% reserve, held 6 months as follows: 

The Cambridge Extension, $100 39 

The Jose Extension, 105 18 

The Farquhar Extension, 39 11 



Total, $244 68 



103 

We are pleased to report that the bill regulating the 
amount of water which Concord can draw from Sandy 
Pond passed the legislature last Spring. A copy of the 
bill is appended to this report. 

The suit brought by Lincoln vs. Concord in the Su- 
preme Court has been withdrawn. 

On Jan. 1, 1912, the water in the pond was 5 feet 3J 
inches below the top of the flash board at the outlet or 
1 foot 6f inches higher than on Jan. 1, 1911, thus showing 
conclusively that under the restrictions, the pond will 
eventually fill and we hope remain substantially full. 

The Venturii Meter near the reservoir has shown during 
the latter part of the year an excessive waste of water 
during the night. Steps have been taken to ascertain, if 
possible, the cause of such waste and this investigation 
will be continued. 

The water takers are earnestly urged to see that all 
fixtures are closed at night and any leaky fixtures repaird. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, Chairman, 

For the Water Commissioners. 



104 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING FEBRUARY i, 1911. 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 

General Statistics 

Population by census of 1910, 1,175. 
Date of construction, 1874. 
By whom owned, Town. 
Source of supply, Sandy Pond. 
Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon, Cross compound Fly Wheel 
Pump, 12" and 20|" x 5| " x 12". 

Deane Compound Condensing Duplex Pump 1\" and 
16"x9|"xl8". 
Description of fuel used. 
Kind, hard and soft coal. 
Brand of coal, Lackawanna, New River. 
Average price of hard coal per gross ton, delivered, $6.65. 
Average price of soft coal, per gross ton, delivered, 
Percentage of ash, 21.5%. 
Wood, price per cord, $5.50. 

Coal consumed for the year in pumping, 331,568 lbs. 
Pounds of wood consumed, equivalent amount of coal, 

866. 
Total equivalent coal consumed for the year, 331,568 

lbs. 
Total pumpage for the year, 71,704,000 gallons. 
Average static head against which pumps work 148.5 ft. 



105 

Average dynamic head against which pumps work 160 ft. 
Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent coal, 

216. 
Duty. 
Cost of Pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

viz., $2,672.40. 
Per million gallons pumped, $37.12. 
Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic ), 23.2 cents. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water 

Estimated total population at date, 1,175. 
Estimated population on lines of pipe, 1,126. 
Estimated population supplied, 1,100. 
Total water pumped for the year, 71,704,000 gallons. 
Passed through meters, 27,390,400 gallons. 
Percentage of consumption metered 38.2. 
Average daily consumption, gallons. 

*Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 129.+ 
*Gallons per day to each consumer, 137.+ 
*Gallons per day to each tap, 523.+ 

*The metered water sold to R. R. Co. is deducted from 
the total consumption in making these averages. 



106 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System. 



Mains. 

1 . Kind of pipe, cast iron 

and cement lined. 

2. Sizes, from 4" to 12". 

3. Extended 5,369 ft. 

during year. 

4. Discontinued 00 ft. 

during year. 

5. Total now in use, 

25,075 miles. 

6. Cost of repairs per 

mile, $0.00. 

7. Number of leaks per 

mile, .36. 

8. Length of pipes less 

than 4 inches diam., 
\ miles. 

9. Number of hydrants 

added during year, 3. 

10. Number of hydrants 

(public and private) 
now in use, 114. 

11. Number of stop gates 

added during year, 
5. 

12. Number of stop gates 

now in use, 18. 

13. Number of stop gates 

smaller than 4 inch, 
0. 

14. Number of blow-offs, 

19. 

15. Range of pressure on 

mains 40 lbs. to 60 
lbs. 



Services. 

16. Kind of pipe, gal v. 

iron and cement 
lined. 

17. Sizes, r to 4* 

18. Extended 78 ft. 

19. Discontinued 00 feet. 

20. Total now in use, 00 

miles. 

21. Number of service 

taps added during 
year, 11. 

22. Number now in use, 

290. 

23. Average length of 

service, 12 feet. 

24. Average cost of serv- 

ice for the year, 
$9.50. 

25. Number of meters 

added, 6. 

26. Number now in use, 

36. 



107 



WATER. 

Payments. 

J. T. Laird, Services as Superintendent and 

Engineer, 
J. T. Laird, Horse Hire, 
W. S. Johnson, Professional Services, 
Charles S. Baxter, Professional Services, 
Innes & Tuttle, Professional Services, 
Matthews, Thompson & Spring, Professional 

Services, 
Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 
S. R. Snelling, Coal, 
R. H. Pratt Coal Co., Coal, 
S. R. Snelling, Teaming Coal, 
Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 
National Express Co., Express, 
J. S. Donavon Co., Automobile Hire, 
M. H. Doherty, Carriage Hire, 
Edison Light Co., Electric Light Service, 
W. J. Hardy, Dinner, 
First National Bank, Coupons, 
First National Bank, Bonds, 
Cunningham Bros., Jose Extension, 
Cunningham Bros., Cambridge Extension, 
Cunningham Bros., Farquhar Extension, 
Winfred Wheeler, Plants, 
Whitman & Howard, Services, 
William C. Pierce, Rent of Land, 
R. H. Pratt Coal Co., Freight Charges, 
Sinking & Trust Fund, Sinking Fund, 
John F. Farrar & Son, 3 cord wood, 
First National Bank, Expense % Water Bonds, 
G. L. Chapin, Collector, 
G. L. Chapin, Water Commissioner, 



$1,026 65 


74 35 


917 97 


1,800 00 


600 00 


'532 92 


178 48 


627 15 


355 75 


67 25 


248 75 


6 60 


25 00 


14 75 


13 40 


38 75 


3,115 00 


1,500 00 


946 66 


903 55 


352 07 


8 25 


76 44 


5 00 


60 48 


2,173 37 


16 50 


3, 60 00 


125 00 


50 00 



108 



J. S. Hart, M.D., Water Commissioner, 

S. H. Blodgett, M.D., Water Commissioner, 

C. S. Wheeler, Water Commissioner, 

C. S. Smith, Water Commissioner, 

George E. Crosby, Printing, 

Chapman Valve Co., Supplies 

National Meter Co., 

Chadwick Boston Lead Co., 

Walworth Mfg. Co., 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., 

Hodge Boiler Co., 

George E. Winslow, 

Boston S. R & R. & Supply Co., 

M. J. Drummond & Co., 

E. B. Badger & Son, 

Union Water Meter Co., 

W. A. Hayes Co., 

Davis & Farnham Mfg. Co., 

Builders' Iron Foundry, 

Deane Steam Pump Co., 

The Garlock Packing Co., 

J. L. Chapin & Son, 



A. J. Dougherty, 

Frank Campobasso, 

Frank Cunningham, 

J. F. Farrar & Son, 

Dan. McAskill, 

Moth Work, 

Tree Warden, 

Cunningham Bros., 

I. N. MacRae, 

Hazen & Whipple, Engineers, 

F. H. Place & Co., 

R. B. Laird, 

David Farquhar, 

Total, 



Labor, 



50 00 


50 


00 


50 00 


50 00 


3 


75 


152 


24 


42 


15 


27 


75 


72 38 


82 


74 


266 


54 


14 


24 


94 


32 


1,170 


63 


7 


75 


24 


79 


60 00 


8 


22 


11 


00 


12 


74 


16 31 


12 


10 


26 


50 


7 33 


133 


33 


72 


33 


6 30 


4 


73 


4 


50 


128 56 


65 


77 


274 30 


2 50 


2 


50 


9 


62 


$18,947 51 



109 



co 
O 

Q 



o 





o 








o 




o «o 




lO 




CO 








CO 




ON 




N 




as 








CO 




O <N 




CM 










GO 




O CM 




<N 




°*L 








00^ 




oo 




CD 




i— i 








i-T 




i>~csf 




c* 




i-H 








rH 




oo o 




GO 




€^ 








€^ 


rH 

H 


&$y-< 




rH 




Jk 










1-3 










o 










rH 

pq 

rJ 


bfi 

d 

el 
■♦a 






cq 














CO 






rH 


^ 












d 






Oi 


CD 












o «r 






y— 1 


+3 


















03 












02 






rH 


**■ 












ond 
nrpl 








>s 
















0) 
pH 


pq 












«CO 


























OiiONfM-* W 


O 




h^NOCO 


*o 


3 
a 


l>(NH(N»OfO 


CO 




oco^o® 


l> 


NGOO^^ 


i— ! 


CO 




00 rH C<l iC <M 


<N 


CD 


H(NO 


i—i 


to l> 


GO 




Oi(NO5 00(N 


CN 




N^H 


rH 


N 


t^ 


GO 




oo co oq 


^ 


CD 


fn 




















o3 


rH CO 


T— 1 


i— i 


T^ 


i-H 




TH rH 


<N 


cT 


CD 


©& 








rH 




t^ 


rH 


GO 


1* 










m 








rH 






CD 

d 

CD 

d 



CD 



<A 



Tfl 

H 

03 ...^ 
ft CD -£ 
CD £ CD 



H 03 rS PS P»H fc 



o 



Ul 






H 






H 




«. 


CO 




TJ 


CO 




CD 

43 


<3 




c 

CD 

f— 1 




d" 

.2 
'43 
o 


ills un 
hand, 
Fund, 




d 


-° d he 




>H 
•+3 


- * o d 




Cons 

Cash 

Wate 

Fuel 

Sinki 



110 
WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT 

WATER RECEIPTS. 

Domestic, $7,796 73 

Meters, 3,797 10 

Uncollected, 292 47 



$11,886 30 



OUTSTANDING WATER BONDS. 

Issue of 1894, due one each year, $3,000 00 

Issue of 1897, due 1917, 10,000 00 

Issue of 1900, due 1930, 23,000 00 

Issue of 1902, due 1932, 9,000 00 

Issue of 1903, due 1933, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1904, due 1934, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1906, due 1936, 14,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due 1937, 4,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due $500 each year, 8,000 00 

Issue of 1911, due $500 " " 6,000 00 



$87,000 00 



Ill 



o 

w 

CO 

& 

W 

w 

to 

o 
to 





eoco^^oiooioooo 




©OOHHW^NONO 




ronaNoiHooMooo 


g 2 


id" o" «©" to 00 oT o" cO~ rfT rj" 


MOOW^O^N^O 


3 § 


T^00>O(M^rJHCDCOT-Ht^ 


^ 




COOrtiOiiOT-iOOOOO^- 1 


ICOCO>0>CCOCOCONN 


■3 s 




ft*fc| 








(NM^LOcONOOOlOi-* 




OOOOOOOOr-ir-i 




0lC:O303Oi05050505(J) 



S to 



II 



IS 


NNNMHMONN^OON© 
T^iO(M<NOiO(M^OO^^OlCQ 


NMHMHOOHMH CO t-H CO 



NNO I OOW NMN CO 

NN^ i iO« I hhO I I CO 
hh IhhiM I I oo 



"CO to 
to 00 Oi 



I I 



OO iO 
NHN 

TfTof 



oioacoo^NooaojNHN 

^OQOOOOOOCOCNIOOtOOOOCO 

«OHNHWCOO(NiOroO^N 



OTfOO05C0^0J(MHTj(05O 
OtO<MOCOOLOi-lC01>CNtOcO 

o co co^ o^ co c^ i>^ to o^ go r-^ r-^ n 

co"o"o"^rH , co"o"r}Tc<rr-rcq"»0'^ 

<NCM(M<NCN|(MC0(N(M(N(N(NX 

CN 



j>co^oot^THr-<a>Ttir^T-Hooo 

0<MCOr^OOOiOCOCO<NCNlCO 
O^cO r-^CNJ CN^CO NffiCDO^MC 

t-T cd th" co" rjT oT tjT i> id to" *o" <m" *-t 

COCN(N(NCN(NCO(M(N<N(NCOCO 

CO 



OOOOOOOOOOOOO 

ooooooooooooo 

COCOtocOOOOOOOOOO 

o"o"o~ o"(m"co~o"o"o"o"o"o"^" 

05iONC0030CO!D(NOOOOO 
T-^tq^l>^tO^CO COC0050(MCOC01> 

td tjh~ Tt^ ■<*" co" cd oo" co" to" co" id" cd i-T 






.S o to O to o to >o to to o 

y(MiO»0(MH^T«00 tH 



(MOOr- l(MtO00C^(MCOCNCO 



K 






ft : 



£X3 






112 



Report of the Treasurer of the Lincoln Cemetery 
Commissioners 



February 1, 1911, Balance on hand, . ... 

Four dividends of $2.50 each on 2 shares Fitchburg Railroad 

preferred, 

Two dividends of $6.00 each on 3 shares Union Pacific 

preferred, ... 

Four dividends of $7.00 each on 4 shares American Sugar 

Refining preferred, 

December 4, 1911, Received from H. E. Barnes, account Cook 

lot 

Balance in Treasurer's hands, February 1st, 1912 . . $293 01 

Securities on hand : 
Two shares Fitchburg Railroad preferred. 
Three shares Union Pacific preferred. 
Four shares American Sugar Refining preferred. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

Treasurer. 



$223 


01 


10 


00 


12 


00 


28 


00 


20 00 



113 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 

Gentlemen: — This year the brush has been cut, and the 
dead wood removed from the trees, on the following 
roads : the Station Road from the center of Town to the 
railroad station, the piece of wood between Tower Road 
and Station Road, Trapelo Road as far as the cemetery, 
Flint Road to. Mr. Flint's residence, Silver Hill Road 
from Trapelo Road to Dr. Herman's, Martin Road, and 
Wayland Road to the Wayland line. The dead limbs 
were remove^ from the trees in the cemetery near the 
Town Hall, and the trees on the common. 

The dead wood and clashing limbs were also removed 
from trees on other roads where it was necessary for 
public safety and convenience. 

Elm Leaf Beetle 

The elm leaf beetle may be controlled and its injury 
to elms prevented by thorough spraying with arsenate of 
lead, 18 pounds to 100 gallons of water, applied to the 
foliage between June 1 and 15, this spraying kills the 
mature beetles in large numbers before they have an 
opportunity to lay their eggs. 

The work of suppression of the Gipsy and Brown Tail 
Moths has been carried on more extensively this year 
thaa it has in the past on the roadsides. 

The Federal Government cleaned up and have taken 
care of about 20 of the roads in this Town for several 
years. 

Owing to the large amount of work to be done in this 
and other states by them, these highways have been left 
to the Town to take care of. 



114 

It has been hard to hold the foliage on the roadsides 
on account of the Brown Tail Moths. Most of them 
were sprayed twice and some three times. Spraying was 
also done on private property where owners wished it 
and paid for same with very good results. The trees on 
all the highways in Town with the exception of one or 
two have been gone over and the Gipsy Moth nests 
creosoted. The Brown Tail nests have also been re- 
moved from the trees on some of the roads, and will be 
removed from all trees before April 1, in order to get best 
results from spraying. 

Reports on the introduction of parasites and fungus 
diseases continue to be of an encouraging nature, but 
much of this work, if not all, is still in an experimental 
stage, and has no appreciable effect on the general situ- 
ation. 

The State Department is going to make a strong cam- 
paign against woodland colonies where no hand suppres- 
sion will be done, by making plantings of the wilt disease, 
and as we have a large number of acres of such woodland 
in this Town we will have a good chance to give it a 
fair trial. I have made arrangements to get enough of 
this disease to plant a thousand acres. 

I wish to thank the Town officers and also the people 
of the Town for their courtesy and the interest shown in 
the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



115 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS 

Lincoln, February 1, 1912. 
To the Town of Lincoln: — 

The Committee on Claims to which was referred the 
question whether the land on which the old schoolhouse 
now stands is the property of the Town, have given it 
careful consideration, but have not been able to reach any 
definite conclusion. 

The records of the Town have been carefully searched 
by A. J. Doherty, Esq., and his statement of w T hat he 
finds is added as an appendix to this report in order that 
the Town may have in some tangible form what the 
records show. From this it appears that the Town ac- 
quired the land on which the school house which preceded 
the present edifice was built, but as the deeds by which 
the Town took the land are not recorded, it is very diffi- 
cult to establish the boundaries and to say exactly what 
the Town did own. 

On the other hand, Mr. J. L. Chapin claimed a portion 
of the land, and a plan recently made by a surveyor from 
his deeds, if correct seems to show that he acquired title 
to a lot, the eastern boundary of which ran through the 
middle of the land on which the present edifice stands. 
The contention is that he gave the Town the use of this 
portion of his land, as well as of an adjacent portion for a 
school yard, upon such terms that when the school build- 
ing is discontinued the land will revert to his heirs. 

Witnesses now living who went to the old school re- 
member the location of the old house, and are prepared to 



116 

testify that the new schoolhouse was built on the site of 
the old. Their testimony would tend to establish title 
in the Town. 

The building is now used for school house purposes in 
that a kindergarten is maintained there to which the 
children of the Town go, although the money to pay the 
expenses of the teacher is supplied by Mrs. Wheelwright, 
and while this use continues we think the building is 
used for school purposes. 

It is apparent, however, that no conclusion which this 
Committee can reach will definitely determine the ques- 
tion, and we think the safer way for the Town is to retain 
the land under a claim of right until Mr. Chapin shall 
establish a better title by proper proceedings in court. 
He cannot, however, obtain possession so long as the 
building is used for school purposes, and what other pro- 
ceedings he may take to establish title must be such as his 
counsel shall advise. 

MOORFIELD STOREY, 
JULIUS E. EVELETH, 
CHARLES S. WHEELER. 






117 



ABSTRACT OF TITLE 

OF 
CENTRE SCHOOL LOT, 
ADJOINING THE COMMON 

IN 
LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 

At the time of the incorporation of the Town in 1754 
there was apparently within its limits three schoolhouses, 
the same being located as follows : — One near what is 
now the Snelling Place in South Lincoln, one near what is 
now the railroad crossing of the South Great Road, and 
one near the Common or land adjoining the Common 
near the old Chestnut Tree. 

The first action taken by the Town after its incorpora- 
tion with reference to schools was taken at a meeting 
August 6th, 1762. The matter under discussion at this 
time was as to how many schoolhouses were necessary 
and where they were to be located. A committee was 
appointed at this meeting to have charge of this matter 
and report to the Town. This committee consisted of 
three men, who at that time lived out of the Town, 
one in Lexington, one in Concord and one in Weston. 
This Committee made a report to the Town at a meeting 
held January 3, 1763. What their report was does not 
appear upon the records, but it does appear that their 
report was not accepted. 

The next year, in 1763, the matter of the schools was 

* again brought before the Town, and at a meeting held 

March 7th of this year action was taken upon the request 

of certain people in the Town to determine the number 



118 

of schoolhouses required and where they were to be 
located. At that time there was in the Town the three 
schoolhouses referred to above. 

The schoolhouse in the middle of the Town, near the 
Chestnut Tree, was not owned by the Town but by pri- 
vate persons, as appears from the records in connection 
with the request above referred to and acted upon at the 
meeting of March 7th. It was voted at this meeting to 
ask the builders of this schoolhouse to give the same to the 
Town. That this school was given to the Town by the 
builders appears from a vote found upon the records of 
the meeting of March 7th, 1763, which is as follows: — 
"That the builders of the schoolhouse that stands in the 
middle of the Town by the Meeting House did at this 
Town Meeting present said schoolhouse as a gift to the 
Town to be improved for the purposes and conveniences 
of a school, and twenty-five rods of land adjoining said 
house, so long as the Town shall see fit to use it for school 
purposes. Voted and accepted." 

No further action affecting the schools in the centre 
of the Town seems to have been taken until the year 1791, 
at which time, or sometime earlier the [schoolhouse in the 
centre of the Town was damaged by fire or otherwise. 
The action taken at this time was as to the disposition 
of the remains of the old schoolhouse then standing nigh 
the Meeting House in said Town. No action seems to 
have been taken upon this vote. This was undoubtedly 
the schoolhouse presented to the Town by the builders as 
above recorded. 

In the year 1792 a schoolhouse was built in the centre 
of the Town by private persons. This school was fash- 
ioned somewhat after an academy and was known as the 
Liberal School, and was located at or about what is now 
the site of the present Centre School and on land adjoining 
the Common. How the builders of this school acquired ■ 
the land upon which the building stood does not appear 



119 

as no records of such acquisition can be found. This 
school was conducted for a period of about fifteen years. 

In 1795 it appears that the Town made an exchange of 
land with Mr. John Adams, who then owned the land 
adjoining the Common and the Liberal Schoolhouse lot, 
as will appear from the following vote: — " Voted that 
the Town will exchange a certain piece of land belong- 
ing to the Town on the easterly part of the Common 
with the proprietors of the Liberal School in Lincoln for 
the same quantity of land now in possession of Mr. John 
Adams on the westerly side of the Common, to be marked 
out by Mr. Nathaniel Weston, Capt. John Hartwell and 
Mr. Samuel Hartwell, as they, the said committee, shall 
judge most expedient; provided, however, that the Com- 
mittee and said proprietors shall judge that such quantity 
of land would discommode the Common and a less 
quantity will answer the purposes of the proprietors, that 
then they reduce the quantity as shall be found neces- 
sary." Whether or not any action was taken upon that 
vote does not appear from an examination of the Town 
Records and the records of the Registry of Deeds. 

The next action with reference to the schools was taken 
at a meeting held December 16th, 1808, and was as fol- 
lows: — Vote, "To see if the Town will provide a suitable 
schoolhouse in the middle of the Town either by building 
or by purchasing the Liberal Schoolhouse, so-called, or 
do any matter or thing respecting said Liberal School- 
house as they shall think best." A committee consisting 
of five persons was appointed at this meeting to purchase 
the Liberal Schoolhouse or to build a school in the middle 
of the Town. This committee reported at a meeting 
held Feb. 14th, 1809, which report was as follows: — "We, 
the subscribers, a committee chosen by the Town at a 
legal meeting holden on the sixteenth day of December, 
A. D. 1808, for the purpose of purchasing the Liberal 
Schoolhouse, so-called, or build an house for the purpose 



120 

of a school for the middle of the Town, have attended 
that service and beg leave to report that we have pur- 
chased the said Liberal School and the land thereto be- 
longing and have agreed on behalf of the Town to pay to 
the proprietors of the said house and land as a compensa- 
tion for the same the sum of four hundred and twenty- 
five dollars, to be paid in eight months from the fifth 
day of January, 1809, and have received for the use of 
the said Town a Warranty Deed of the premises with 
the use of the house for the present season." This report 
was accepted by the Town at said meeting. What be- 
came of the Warranty Deed referred to above does not 
appear as no such deed can be found upon the records 
of the Registry of Deeds. 

In 1809 it appears that the schoolhouse that was given 
to the Town by the builders was moved from where it 
stood on the easterly side of the Common and located 
apparently upon land adjoining the lot upon which the 
Liberal Schoolhouse stood. A vote of this moving ap- 
pears upon the records of the Town at a meeting held in 
1809, a copy of which is as follows: — "Voted — that leave 
be given to move the schoolhouse mentioned in said 
article; that it may be moved westerly from where it 
now stands and to land belonging to Mr. Jonas Adams. 
Then made choice of Dr. Grosvenor Tarbell, Mr. Isaac 
Munroe, Mr. Amos Bemis, Major Daniel Brooks and 
Lieutenant Elijah Fiske, as a committee with leave tjD 
move said house and obtain a deed of land sufficient 
upon which to set said house, also to move the wall as 
mentioned in this article with liberty to call upon the 
Selectmen of this Town to provide suitable drink which 
may be found necessary for the workmen at the removal 
of said house and wall." 

No record of any purchase of land under this vote ap- 
pears, but there is no doubt that this schoolhouse was 
moved as there appears upon the records of the Town 



121 

Treasurer an item wherein one Thomas Wheeler was 
paid the sum of $4.66 for beef and cider found by the 
direction of the Committee for moving the middle school. 

In 1851 it appears that the Town got into some con- 
troversy with Francis Newhall, who was then the owner 
of the land adjoining the lot upon which the schoolhouse 
stood. A committee was appointed at that time to take 
up the matter with Mr. Newhall and adjust the same, 
either by buying land, erecting a fence, or anything that 
they may consider to the interests of the Town. No 
record of any action ever being taken by this Committee 
can be found. 

No further changes appear with regard to the Centre 
Schoolhouse until 1870 when the present schoolhouse was 
built and presumably located upon the site upon which 
the Liberal Schoolhouse then stood. In connection with 
the locating of the present Centre Schoolhouse, there is 
the following taken from the Town Records of a meeting 
held May 30th, 1870:— "Motion— that the building be 
located on or near the site now occupied by the old 
school. Voted to accept the motion." 

That this school was located on the old site or that it 
was supposed to have been located upon the old site, 
and in addition to the above motion, there is the fol- 
lowing upon the Records of the First Parish: — "The 
Building Committee appointed by the Town to carry 
into effect its vote to erect the schoolhouse, respectfully 
submit to the First Parish that in pursuance of the 
duties under instruction of the Town, they located said 
schoolhouse on land occupied by the old Primary School- 
house and adjacent thereto without intention of impos- 
ing on the rights of any parties." 

In conclusion I would say that the land upon which the 
present Centre Schoolhouse stands was not a part of the 
Common land, neither was it that land presented to the 
Town in 1763 by the Builders of the Schoolhouse referred 



122 

to in the above vote, but was land that was owned by the 
Proprietors of the Liberal School and sold to the Town. 

There is no deed on record of the transfer of this 
Liberal Schoolhouse lot to the Town but there is upon the 
Records of the Town Treasurer for the year 1810 various 
items wherein the different proprietors of this Liberal 
School were paid various sums as their proportionate 
shares in said schoolhouse and lot. 

That the schoolhouse given by the Builders to the 
Town together with twenty-five rods of land in the year 
1763 stood on the easterly side of the Common is borne 
out by the fact that a school was moved from the easterly 
side of the Common and moved westerly upon land then 
owned by Jonas Adams. That this schoolhouse was 
moved and located upon the westerly side of the Com- 
mon, there is but little doubt as it is known by many that 
there was standing adjoining the Liberal Schoolhouse a 
building that was used as a Hearse House. There is 
nothing upon the records to show that the Town ever 
built a Hearse House, and that in all probability the old 
schoolhouse, that is the one given by the Builders in 
1763, was moved and used as a Hearse House. 

To further substantiate the fact that the Liberal 
School comprised the lot now occupied by the Present 
Centre School, we find upon an examination of the early 
records and transfers of land adjoining the Common 
where reference is made to " The Meeting House Lot," 
"The Common," and "Land belonging to the Proprietors 
of the Liberal School." Records of transfers as early as 
the year 1797 are to be found containing such descrip- 
tions. 



123 

LINCOLN COMMON LAND 
LAND COMPRISING COMMON 

The original Common Lot was deeded by Edward 
Flint to Trustees for the then newly laid out precinct, by 
deed dated June 4th, 1746, a copy of this deed being 
found upon the Precinct Records, the quantity of land 
being about one acre. The following is a copy of deed : — 

"To all people to whom this deed or gift shall come, 
know ye that I, Edward Flint, of Concord in the County 
of Middlesex, in the Province of Massachusetts Bay, in 
New England, yeoman, for and in consideration of the 
great difficulty that the inhabitants of the Easterly part 
of Concord, and the Northerly part of Weston, and the 
Westerly part of Lexington, labored under with respect 
to their enjoying the publick worship and ordinances of 
God by reason of their remoteness from their respective 
places of publick worship, and considering that they have 
petitioned the General Court of said Province, to set 
them off to be a ministerial precinct, therefore to relieve 
them, and considering that a certain number of said 
petitioners have prepared a frame for a meeting house 
already to be set up and have given and devoted the 
same to the free and publick use of the Society that have 
already joined or shall hereafter join and continue to 
promote said affair, together with my own inclination to 
promote so necessary and good a work, I do by these 
presents grant, alien, convey and convert unto Messrs. 
Benjamin Brown, of said Weston, Judah Clark, of said 
Lexington, and Nathan Brown, of Concord abovesaid, 
all in the County abovesaid, yeomen, being chosen Trus- 
tees, or a committee for said Society and in their interests 
name and behlaf , to receive the title to a convenient and 
suitable piece or parcel of land to set a Meeting House 
upon for said Society, a certain piece or parcel of clear 
land situate, lying and being in Concord abovesaid, 



124 

containing by estimation one acre more or less, and is 
bounded as follows: — Northerly by land of Mr. Ephrian 
Flint, beginning at a stake and heap of stones standing on 
the south side of the stone wall and thence running west- 
erly to another stake and stones, and running southerly 
to a third stake and stones, and thence running easterly 
to a fourth stake and stones, thence turning and running- 
northeasterly to a fifth stake and stones, thence turning- 
northwesterly to the stake and stones first mentioned; 
said land as above bounded and described, to have and 
to hold with all and singular the rights, privileges and 
appurtenances thereunto belonging, or in any wise ap- 
pertaining, to them, the said Benjamin Brown, Judah 
Clark and Nathan Browm, in their said capacity, and 
with them to the said Society and their heirs; to be by 
them enjoyed and improved for the publick use above- 
said forever. 

In Witness Whereof I, the said Edward Flint and Love, 
my now married wife, have hereunto set our hands and 
seals this fourteenth day of October, A.D. 1745, and in 
the nineteenth year of His Majesty's reign. 

Signed, sealed and delivered 

in the presence of 

Charles Pierce, Jr. 

Josiah Blanchard. 
Middlesex, ss. Concord, June 4th, 1746. The within 
named Edward Flint personally appearing acknowledged 
the within written instrument to be his voulntary act and 
deed. Before me, 

John Flint, 

Justice of the Peace." 

This deed was not recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

The next addition to the Common appears to be by 
deed of gift by the proprietors of the schoolhouse in the 
Centre of the Town in 1763, the quantity of land being 
25 rods. 



125 

It next appears that the Town purchased of Mr. John 
Adams in 1792 a small lot of land then represented as 
Common land near the public Meeting House, paying 
for the same £ 4 and 10 shillings. The quantity of 
land is not given and no record of such deed appears 
upon the records of the Registry of Deeds. 

It next appears upon the Town Records that there was 
an exchange of land by the Town and the Proprietors of 
the Liberal School with John Adams. It appears that 
the Town exchanged a piece of land on the east side of 
the Common for a piece of land belonging to Adams and 
the Liberal School on the west side of the Common. 
This was in the year 1795. The quantity of land is not 
stated and no deed of same appears upon the records of 
the Registry of Deeds. 

The next purchase was by the Town from the proprie- 
tors of the Liberal School, being the land and buildings. 
This purchase was made in the year 1809. The quantity 
of land was not stated, nor was any deed upon the records. 

The next purchase was by the Town of Jonas Adams 
of a small piece of land to enlarge and widen the highway 
and Common. The Town paid for this land the sum of 
$12. This was in the year 1810. The quantity of 
land was not stated, nor was any deed of same ever 
recorded. 

There next appears upon the records of a Town Meet- 
ing held in 1809 the following: — "To see if the Town shall 
remove the schoolhouse in the middle of the Town and 
also move the wall nigh said house so as to lay the land 
common which belongs to the Town. ' ' Under this article 
it is voted that leave be given to move the schoolhouse 
mentioned in said article ; that it might be moved westerly 
from whence it there stood to land of Jonas Adams. It 
does not appear in this vote what land was purchased or 
whether or not any land was purchased, nor does it 
appear on any record that Mr. Adams was paid for this 
land, and no deed of same can be found upon the records. 



126 

The following was taken from the Town Treasurer's 
Reports: — 

May, 1793 Paid Mr. John Adams, £4 10 shillings 

for a piece of land lying near the Meeting 
House of the said Town sold by said 
Adams for said sum. 

January 20, 1810 Paid to sundry persons for notes given 
for the Liberal Schoolhouse, the latter 
signed by the Treasurer for the sum 
set against their respective names; 
here following seventeen names each 
receiving $18. 

May 6, 1810 Paid Thomas Wheeler $4.66 in full for 
65 pounds of beef and half barrel of 
cider found by direction of committee 
for removal of middle schoolhouse. 

May 2, 1810 Paid Jonas Adams $12 in full for land 
purchased of him for the accommoda- 
tion of the Common and highway a 
little easterly of his barn. 

May 2, 1810 Paid to sundry persons for notes given 
for the Liberal Schoolhouse, so-called, 
signed by Treasurer for the sum set 
against their respective names: — 

Stephen Codman, Esq $38 .34 

Dr. Frank Tarbell 18 .36 

Deacon Thomas Wheeler 18 .00 

Samuel Hoar, Esq 56 .51 

Nov. 8, 1810 Paid the Proprietors of the Liberal 
School so-called $31.75, in full for land 
of said house. 



127 

LINCOLN FIRST PARISH LAND 
FIRST PARISH LAND 

The land originally owned by the First Parish com- 
prised that land known as the Common and deeded by 
Edward Flint to the precinct in 1746, containing about 
one acre. 

The land next acquired by the First Parish seems to 
have been by purchase from Elisah and Albert Hager, 
deed dated October 10, 1870 and recorded with Middle- 
sex Deeds Book 1150, page 574, the quantity of land not 
being mentioned, although the land was deeded by metes 
and bounds. 

The next land acquired was by deed from George G. 
Tarbell dated May 31st, 1892, recorded with Middlesex 
Deeds, Book 2138, page 170, the quantity of land being 
3144 square feet. This deed was b} r plan recorded at 
the end of Book 2138. 

The First Parish at the time of the purchase from Mr. 
Tarbell gave by deed to Mr. Tarbell a small piece of land 
containing about 1,370 square feet and being presumably 
part of the land that they acquired by deed of Mr. 
Hager. 

It will be noted from this that the land upon which the 
Liberal Schoolhouse stood and now being the present 
Centre School lot was not at any time part of land deeded 
by Edward Flint to the precinct and therefore does not 
or never has come under comtrol of the First Parish. 



128 



ABSTRACT OF TITLE 

OF 
JAMES L. CHAPIN LAND 
IN 
LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 

ABSTRACT OF TITLE TO JAMES L. CHAPIN 
LAND IN LINCOLN 



Francis Newhall 

to 
James L. Chapin 
April 3, 1858 
Recorded Book 792, 
page 219 



Warranty Deed 
Consideration $3,800. 

Description: — 

A certain tract of land situated 
in said Lincoln containing 8 acres 
and 54 rods more or less and 
bounded as follows: — Beginning 
at the northeast corner near the 
Meeting house First Parish, and 
running westerly 47 rods on land 
of Elisah Hager, thence southerly 
on land of Calvin Smith to land 
of the heirs of Elijah Fiske, 
thence on land of said Heirs of 
Elijah Fiske as the fence now 
stands to the road running from 
Lincoln to Concord, thence by 
said road to land of Heirs of Amos 
Bemis and land of the Second 
Parish to the Common, thence by 
said Common and schoolhouse 
land to the corner first mentioned 
or however otherwise bounded or 
reputed to be bounded, it being 
the same land conveyed to me by 



129 

deed of Pliney Newhall, dated 
June 18th, 1836, recorded Mid- 
dlesex Registry of Deeds, Book 
355, page 461. 

No encumbrances. 
Duly acknowledged. 



Mary Child 

to 
Pliney Newhall 



Discharge of mortgage given by 
Pliney Newhall to Jonas Smith 
dated November 26th, 1835, re- 
corded Book 346, page 545. 



April 3, 1858 
Recorded Book 792, 
page 219. 



Description : — 

Same as in deed of Martha Cole 
to Pliney Newhall, dated October 
10th, 1835, recorded Book 346, 
page 545. 



Jonas Smith 

to 
Mary Child 



Assignment of mortgage given by 
Pliney Newhall to Jonas Smith 
dated November 26th, 1835, re- 
corded Book 346, page 545. 



November 27th, 1854 
Recorded Book 792, 
page 218. 



Description : — 

Same as in deed of Martha Cole 

to Pliney Newhall, recorded as 

above. 



Pliney Newhall 

to 
Jonas Smith 



Mortgage Deed 
Consideration $500. 



130 



November 26th, 1835 
Recorded Book 346, 
page 545 



Description : — 

Same as in deed of Martha Cole 

to Pliney Newhall, recorded as 

above. 



Pliney Newhall 

to 
Francis Newhall 

June 18, 1836 
Recorded Book 355, 
page 461. 



Quitclaim deed. 
Consideration — $500. 

Description :— 

Same as in deed of Francis New- 
hall to James L. Chapin, which is 
recorded Book 792, page 219, 
being the same land conveyed by 
Martha Cole in two deeds to said 
Pliney Newhall. 
No encumbrances. 
Duly acknowledged. 



Martha Cole 

to 
Pliney Newhall 

October 10, 1835 
Recorded Book 346, 
page 545. 



Warranty Deed 
Consideration— $487. 

Description : — 

A certain tract of land situated in 
Lincoln near to the Meeting 
House of the said Town, contain- 
ing 6 acres and 109 rods by survey 
being bounded as follows: — Be- 
ginning at Road leading from 
Lincoln to Concord on the corner 
of land of Edmund Wheeler, Jr., 
and running north 42 degrees east 
ten rods; then north 43 degrees 
east four rods 21 links and bound- 
ed on land of said Wheeler, thence 



131 

north one-fourth degree east 27 
rods and 21 links bounded on 
land of said Newhall, thence 
north 80 J degrees west 35 rods 
and 19 links, on land of Mr. Eli- 
jah Hager, thence south by land 
of Mr. George Weston, thence on 
land of Rev. Eben Newhall as the 
fence now stands until it comes to 
the road, thence bounded on said 
road to the point first mentioned. 

' No encumbrances. 
Duly acknowledged. 

(One deed from Martha Cole to Pliney Newhall missing. ) 



George Weston 

to 
Martha Cole. 

March 15, 1834 
Recorded Book 333, 
page 326 



Quitclaim Deed. 
Consideration $503. 12 J. 

Description: — 

One piece of land situated in said 
Lincoln near the Meeting House, 
containing seven acres and 30 
rods, bounded : — Beginning at 
the north by land belonging to 
Elijah Hager, on the east by land 
belonging to Pliney Newhall, on 
the south by land belonging to 
Horatio Wheeler, on the south 
by road leading from Lincoln to 
Concord, on the west by land of 
said Weston. 



No encumbrances. 
Duly acknowledged. 



132 



Martha Cole, Execu- 
trix of will of Abra- 
han Cole 

to 
George Weston. 
Feb 22, 1834 
Recorded Book 333, 
page 324. 



Sale on order of Probate Court 
for payment of debts. 

Description : — 

Same as in deed of George Weston 
to Martha Cole recorded Book 
333, page 325. 



George Tarbell et als 

to 
Abraham Cole 

May 10th, 1816. 
Book 217, page 97. 



Description : — 

A piece of land lying west of the 
Meeting House and east of said 
Cole's containing by measure eight 
acres, 137 rods and bounded west- 
erly on land of said Cole, south- 
erly on the County Road until it 
comes within 1J rods of the 
Chaise's House belonging to said 
farm to a stake and stones by 
wall, thence turning northeast 
and running to a stake and stones 
by a wall standing on the north 
side of the barn belonging to said 
farm and at the corner of the wall, 
thence bounded on the east wall 
until it comes to the Meeting 
House, thence bounded easterly 
on said barn and schoolhouse lot 
and northerly on land of the Rev. 
John Codman. 






Thomas Tufts . 

to 
Samuel Hoar, Gro- 
vesnor Tarbell and 
Abraham Cole. 

March 3, 1814 
Book 207, page 53. 



133 

Assignment of mortgage held by 
said Tufts. 

For description see Book 195, 
page 323, as also for record of 
mortgage on which this assign- 
ment was written. 



Jonas Adams 

to 
Thomas Tufts 

March 8, 1811 
Recorded Book 195, 
page 323 



Mortgage Deed. 
Consideration — $2,190. 

Description : — 

Several parcels of land. First : — 
A parcel of land in middle of 
Town of Lincoln, containing 60 
acres, be the same more or less 
and bounded as follows: — One 
piece of the same southerly on 
the Town Road, westerly on land 
of Abraham Cole, southerly on 
land late of John Codman, de- 
ceased, easterly on the Common, 
so-called, to the Road first men- 
tioned, including all the buildings 
thereon standing. 

Duly acknowledged. 



John Adams 

to 
Jonas Adams. 

Jan. 3, 1797 

Book 168, page 326. 



Warranty Deed. 
Consideration $400. 

Description : — 
Land in Lincoln nigh the Public 
Meeting House beginning at South- 



134 

east corner of the hog-pen at 
the end of the stone wall bounded 
southerly on the road as the wall 
now stands, to the corner of land 
of the Rev. Charles Stearns and 
bounded westerly on the land of 
the said Stearns as the wall now 
stands to the corner of land of 
Ephriam Weston, and bounded 
northerly on land of said Weston 
as the wall now satnds to the land 
belonging to the said Town, or to 
the Common, so-called, thence 
bounded easterly on said Com- 
mon land and on land belonging 
to the proprietors of the Liberal 
School in Lincoln, so-called, and 
on a Town road to the point first 
mentioned; containing 10 acres 
more or less. 

No encumbrances. 
Duly acknowledged. 



Edward Flint 

to 
John Adams, Jr. 



Warranty Deed 

Consideration — Love and affec- 
tion. 



Dec. 1, 1749 
Book 52, page 543 



Description : — 

Seven acres more or less in Con- 
cord, bounded from a stake and 
heap of stones at the northeast 
corner of the Meeting House lot 
adjoining to Timothy Weston's 
land, south by said Weston's lot 



135 

and to the Meeting House to my 
dwelling house, and from the 
middle of said house running 
southerly to a stake and heap of 
stones on said Weston's land and 
thence northerly and easterly by 
said Weston's land to a stake and 
stones first mentioned. 

Duly acknowledged. 

Respectfully submitted, 
A. J. DOHERTY. 



September 13, 1911. 



136 



TRUSTEE'S REPORT 

The question of the class of books bought with the 
funds at the disposal of the Trustees for that purpose, 
and the character of the literature placed upon the shelves 
of the Library has, during the past year, occupied a more 
than ordinary amount of the attention of the Board. 
The problem is practical but difficult of solution. Both 
the money at command and space in the Library Build- 
ing are limited. When once purchased, ' books go upon 
the shelves and there remain. In the case of any and 
every Library the result is merely a question of time; 
and, in the case of the Lincoln Library, its amount of 
shelf room being necessarily limited, it is a question of 
comparatively short time. The shelves will soon be- 
come overcrowded. 

With a view of forming some intelligent judgment of 
the use made of the money and of the character of the 
books added to the collection, the Trustees have accord- 
ingly, during the past year, caused a record to be kept, 
from which it seemed possible some useful conclusions 
might be derived. 

During the year, it appears that some 155 volumes, of 
which the titles are specified, have been purchased, at a 
cost of approximately $250. Each of these volumes, it 
would appear, has on the average been borrowed, — that 
is taken from the Library — six times, the average cost of 
each borrowing being approximately, twenty (20 cents) . 
Hardly any volume of those specified has not been bor- 
rowed at least once, though it would seem that fifteen 
volumes had but a single borrower each. Of the books 



137 

thus purchased and added to the Library, thirty-three 
(33 ) have been called for ten times or over; while, of the 
twelve (12) books most frequently called for, eight (8) 
were of fiction, and four (4) were of a miscellaneous 
character. The works of fiction, in the order of popu- 
larity, were as follows: — 

Keeping up with Lizzie Issued 25 times 

One Way Out u 23 " 

Molly-Make-Believe " 21 " 

Woman Haters " 2 

Clay-hanger " 18 " 

Robinetta '■' 17 " 

Old Home House " 17 " 

Denry the Audacious 17 " 

The following were the titles of the four works of 
miscellaneous character : 

How to live on Twenty-four Hours a Day Issued 14 times 

Down to the Sea " 13 " 

Life of Harriet Beecher Stowe " 11 " 

Human Machine " 13 " 

The Trustees do not feel called upon to pass upon the 
character of the above books. They would all seem to be 
harmless, if not highly instructive or manifestly edifying. 
The titles indicate, however, to a certain extent, the 
nature of the book demand, as it to-day exists in Lon- 
coln. It would be matter of interest to compare the 
above list with similar lists, if such were kept, in neigh- 
boring towns, or in the Public Library in Boston; also to 
get the titles and character of twelve other recently 
published volumes in greatest demand in those places. 
This the Trustee have as yet had no opportunity to do. 
They propose, however, to continue the investigation, 
and see what conclusions, if any, can safely be derived 
from it. 



138 

Meanwhile, it seems not inappropriate to call attention 
to the fact that none of the books named are likely to 
prove of permanent value, or to be continuously called 
for. They are, without exception, in the nature of 
ephemeral literature — books of the season. A natural 
inference would be that of the books ordinarily purchased 
with the money at the disposal of the Library, not one 
in ten is likely to prove of lasting value, or indeed ever 
to be called for again six months, at furthest, after its 
acquisition. Its permanent continuance on the shelves 
is, accordingly, not desirable. It is so much dead matter. 

The obvious conclusion is that it is highly desirable 
the shelves of the Lincoln, as of other libraries, should be 
purged of literature of the lighter or passing character at 
stated intervals. It perhaps would not be a wholly un- 
safe principle of guidance to lay down the rule that every 
year volumes of that or previous years amounting to 
nine-tenths the acquisitions, should be disposed of, and 
the shelves to that extent relieved. 

Beginning with the current year, the Library of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College has entered the field 
of Library Extension. Upon request it sends out small 
selected collections of books or "libraries," so called, 
upon agriculture and related subjects, which can be 
borrowed by any local Library asking for the same. 
These "libraries" relate to such topics as Harvesting and 
Marketing of Crops, Poultry, Farmers' Co-operative 
Societies, Seed Selection, Testing, Rural Social Better- 
ment Work, Vegetable Gardening, etc., of peculiar 
interest to communities engaged in farming or cultiva- 
tion under glass. The Trustees have taken advantage 
of this opportunity, and the Library has received from 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College a collection of 
books which are now open to borrowers. 



139 

The leading titles of these works are as follows :- 

Agricultural Economics. 

Plant Breeding. Bailey. 

Diseases of Cattle. 

Rural Wealth and Welfare. 

Rural Hygiene. 

Concrete Silos. 

Cost of Food. 

Home Nursing. 

Economic Entomology. 

Soil Fertility and Permanent Agriculture. 

Fertilizers. 

Alfalfa. 

Picking, Storing, and Marketing of Fruit. 

Healthful Farm House. 

Chemistry of Plant and Animal Life. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES F. ADAMS, 

Chairman Trustees. 



140 



StOCOOlOOO lOWWOOOONiOOO OMiOOOONN 
'^COiOOOO MNNNOOHfOMOtD <o CO ■* O ^H lO >o 



<©0© 
cNCNcN 



K 



c 
_p 

. 6 
O^ 
_: * 
. as - 
■Hi? 

: ^§ 

05 3C -1 ,3 O 

6 03_(j3 - 



5 2 » 

* " n S 7 

S o g.2o 

OOQ > h r* 
O * g fcj 

^ -id ai 3 



W 3- ft-g 

. . £0*1 

o w .-5 3 
■g w'-s as a 

-3-i -. jQ CJ 



g- 'JS » S bD"3 M.S bfi 



s 

0.2 c3 

Ot! « 

_ 



5'S r] 
s g o . 

•S go, 



a >>c 



Sfl-sflbi 



iffl.2 



253-a ojsjj 

<u — H 3 o3 B as 3_ssl> as 

fs Mg cJEii c a m c 

3fl«cosg iS^o 
3 g 2 u ^d.2 , - , .2 d 2 

,° C3T3.S 3T3 -T3 St) 



'3^ as — oS? 

Idfi'S* : & 

— o ^-^ - o - 

r, c 2 3_ ^ ° 03 

cs.3 3 01 OJr^k-i 

« a"q o3 s u g 

Sd w «o g . 

O 3 B^^ o 

-a o o -^ 03 



^ oQ 



«N TfOCNOO 
O 00 i-l O !-• .-< © 
■■fT 00 ■ tJi CO 



I CO 







B 
C 






c 

"5 




Legacy 



s " 

Fund 



- 1 3 O g-B- 

_: S 3 2 3- 

a _ 






&TJ £T3 
O O O O 

HOEhO 



3 co rt -S o 

B W .h^ • 

03 asQ < 
c t, • 3 03 

T3 O o-S^: 

O CD OA ~ 



H £ 



= 5-cS 



3 
o 
2 




o o 

+i 00 




03 


o 


b <u a 




3 




o . o 
a'g a 




jj 


"G oj'E 




_c 


o3: 




DO CO 




"o 


te 


& C-O 






13 


3 tu 3 




a; 


3- 


73 ftCC 




r3 


03 " 


03 . 




-P 




a>P-i <P 




-3 


0). 

3 


M . M 




a> 


03 co o3 
00 t, CO 






ifl 


M(Dj 


'53 
o 


O" 




(0 

03 


kl 


H B .H g 


^3 
3 

.2 




a 




"53" 


3 3 


c 


O 


53 as 


-C 




a a 

02 02 


h^ 






V 






— 


©^ 


© i-i 








©02 


© © 




i-H .-( 


T-« l-H 





141 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC 

LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR ENDING Feb. i, 1912 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1911, 9,281 

Increase by purchase, 155 

Increase by gift 8 

Increase by binding periodicals, 14 

Total Increase , 178 

Number of volumes rebound, 7 
Number of volumes worn out and replaced by new 

copies, 6 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1912, 9,459 

Total delivery of books for year, 7,795 

Largest delivery in one day (Nov. 22), 123 

Smallest delivery in one day (Dec. 16), 29 

Number of days Library was open, 103 



142 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Gifts of books, periodicals, etc., have been received 
during the year from the following persons: — Hon. C. F. 
Adams, Mrs. Julia Balbach, Mr. J. W. Bookwalter, Mr. 
J. E. Baker, Mr. Arthur Chapin, Mrs. Ellen Campbell, 
Mr. Hall, Mr. E. Pope, Miss Elsie Pierce, Mr. Robert P. 
Porter, Mr. W. H. Reed, Mrs. H. C. Richardson, Mrs. 
N. L. Husted, Mr. Daniel C. Stone, Mr. D. M. Tipton, 
Mrs. A. C. Wheelwright. 



143 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

ACCESSIONS TO THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR 1911 

BIOGRAPHY 

Addams, Jane. Twenty years at Hull House: With autobiog- 
raphical notes 531 . 19 

Benson, Arthur Christopher. Ruskin: A study in personality . 631 . 12 
Cortissoz, Royal. John LaFarge : A menoir and a study . 631 . 15 

Poumies de la Siboutie, Pierre. Recollections of a Parisian 
under six sovereigns, two revolutions and a republic,- 1789- 
1863 ; translated from French by Lady Theodora Davidson 531 . 20 
Fraser, Mrs. Hugh. Diplomatist's wife in many lands. 2 vols. 631.13 

Fields, Annie. Letters of Sarah Orne Jewett 636 . 8 

Gilder, Richard Watson. Grover Cleveland : A record of friend- 
ship 636.5 

Hare, Christopher. Most illustrious ladies of the Italian Renais- 
sance 631.16 

Miles, Nelson A. Serving the Republic : Memoirs of the civil and 
military life of Nelson A. Miles, Lieutenant General of the 

U. S. army . ' . ' 636.7 

O'Brien, Barry. John Bright ; A monograph 631.18 

Records of a life long friendship, 1807-1882. Ralph Waldo 

Emerson and William Henry Furness. H. H. F. Editor . 533.21 
Stanton, Theodore. Reminiscences of Rosa Bonheur . . 631 . 14 
Storey, Moorfield, and Emerson, Edward Waldo. Ebenezer 

Rockwood Hoar : A memoir 636 . 8 

Stowe, Charles Edward and Beecher, Lyman. Harriet, 

Beecher Stowe: Story of her life 631.19 

Villard, Oswald Garrison. John Brown, 1800-1859. A biography 

fifty years after 631.11 

Wagner, Richard. Life of Richard Wagner. 2 vols . . . 631 . 17 
Washington, Booker T. My larger education: Being chapters 

from my experience 636 . 7 

Wilbur, Sibyl. Life of Mary Baker Eddy *631.12 



144 



HISTORY 

Adams, Charles Francis. Studies: Military and diplomatic. 
Contents: Military Studies: Battle of Bunker Hill; Battle 
of Long Island; Washington and Cavalry; Revolutionary 
campaign of 1777; Battle of New Orleans; Ethics of suc- 
cession; Some phases of the Civil War; Lee's Centennial; 
Diplomatic Studies; An historical residum; Queen Victoria 
and the Civil War *1532.21 

Fletcher, Charles Robert Leslie and Kipling, Rudyard. History 

of England 366.7 

Hudson, Alfred Sereno. History of Concord, Mass. Colonial 

Concord. Vol. 1 *325.13 



TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION 

Bingham, Hiram. Across South America: An account of a 
journey from Buenos Aires to Lima by way of Potosi; with 
notes on Brazil, Chili, and Peru, with eighty illustrations 

and maps 446 . 20 

Bisland, Elizabeth Editor. Japanese letters of Laf acadio Hearn 442 . 22 

Collier, Price. The West in the East . . . . . 446.19 

French, George. New England: What it is and what it is to be 446 . 18 

Hart, Albert Bushnell. The obvious Orient 437.2 

Hittell, Theodore H. Adventures of James Capen Adams. 

Mountaineer and grizzly bear hunter of California . 437 .11 
Ross, Edward Alsworth. The changing Chinese: The conflict of 

Oriental and western cultures in China .... 431.14 

Winter, William. Over the border 431.12 

Woodberry, George E. Editor. European years .... *431 . 13 



SCIENCE. USEFUL ARTS 

Erskine, John and Helen. Written English: A guide to the rules 

of composition 138.4 

Harris, H. F. Health on the farm: A manual of rural sanitation 

and hygiene 214.6 

Kelly, Edmond Twentieth Century socialism; What it is not; 

what it is; how it may come . 147.25 

Lougheed, Victor. Vehicles of the air: A popular exposition of 

modern aeronautics with working drawings . . . 131 . 17 
Plumb, Charles S. Types and breeds of farm animals . . 214.5 
Soyer, Nicolas. Soyer's paper-bag cookery .... 123 . 18 

Taylor, Frederick Winslow. Principles of scientific management 141 . 19 



145 



RELIGION. PHILOSOPHY 

Hodges, George. Training of children in religion .... 1124.21 

Brown, Charles Reynolds. Faith and health .... 1132.10 

Brent, Charles H. The sixth sense : Its cultivation and its use . 1 124 . 22 



FICTION 



Molly Make Believe 
other stories 



Abbott, Eleanor Hallowell. 

Sick-a-bed lady; and 

Audoux, M. Marie-Claire 

Bacheller, Irving. Keeping up with Lizzie 

Bacon, Josephine Daskam. While Caroline was growing 

Bennet, Arnold. Buried alive: A tale of these days 

Clayhanger 

Denry the audacious 

Benson, E. F. Margery 

Brown, Alice. John Winterbourne's family 
Brown, Frederick Walworth. Dan McLean's adventures 
Buckrose, J. E. Down our street ....'. 

Calthrop, Dion Clayton. Perpetua : or the way to treat a woman 
Carleton, William. One way out : A middle class New Englander 

emigrates to America .... 
Chesterton, G. K. Innocence of Father Brown 
Codman, Mrs. Russell. An ardent American 
Conrad, Joseph. Lord Jim .... 
Corner of Harley Street: Being some familiar correspondence of 

Peter Harding, M.D. 
Coulevain, De Pierre. Unknown isle. 
D eland, Margaret. The Iron woman 
Farnol, Jeffrey. The broad highway 
Fuller, Anna. Later Pratt portraits 
Harrison, Henry Sydnor. Queed 
Jacobs, W. W. Ship's company 
Kester, Vaughn. The prodigal judge 
Lincoln, Joseph C. "Old home house" 

The woman haters ... 
Locke, William J. Glory of Clementina 
Lucas, E. V. Mr. Ingleside 
Marks, Jeannette. End of a song . 
Mitchell, S. Weir. John Sherwood: Iron 
Mitchell, John Ames. Pandora's box 
Montgomery, L. M. The story girl 
Morris, Kathleen. Mother: A story 
Pier, Arthur Stanwood. Jester of St. Timothy's 
Silberrad, Una L. The good comrade . 
Smith, F. Hopkinson. Kennedy Square 



Master 



757.24 

754.6 

755.15 

755.10 

757 . 20 

757.23 

756.16 

756.20 

754.3 

755.11 

755.6 

755.16 

754.15 

757.21 
754.7 
754.4 

755.12 

755.8 

754.2 

755.14 

756.17 

756.21 

755.20 

754.9 

756.22 

755 9 

755.5 

755.18 

757.22 

755.7 

755.2 

754.5 

755.4 

754.14 

754.12 

755.21 

755.19 



146 



Tallentyre, S. ('«. Basset : A village Chronicle 
Van Dyke, Henry. The sad shepard 
Waller, Mary E. My ragpicker .... 
Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. Case of Richard Meynell 

Watts, Mary S. The legacy 

Wemyss, Mary C People of Popham . 

The professional aunt . . 

Whitechurch, Victor L. Off the main road: A village 
Wiggin, Kate Douglas. Mother Carey's chickens 

Kate Douglas and others. Robinetta 
Wister, Owen. Members of the family . 

Padre Ignacio 

Wright, Harold Bell. Winning of Barbara Worth 
Wright, Mabel Osgood. Love that lives 




756.15 

754.13 

754.16 

754.1 

755.3 

756.18 

755.17 

754.11 

754.18 

756.19 

755.1 

754.17 

755.13 

754.10 



JUVENILE 

Barrie, J. M. Peter and Wendy 

Adams, Andy, We% brothers: Young cattle kings 

Bacon, Dolores. Operas that every child should know ; description 

of the text and music of the most famous masterpieces 
Baker, Etta Anthony. Frolics at Fairmount 
Brown, Alice. One footed fairy: and other stories 
Burnett, Frances Hodgson. The secret garden 
Byron, May. Cecil Alden's happy family: Being the adventures 

of hungry Peter, the pig; Rufus, the cat; Humpty and 

Dumpty, the rabbits; Rags, the dog; Master Quack, the 

duckling, and Forager, the puppy. Illustrated 
Cabot, Ella Lyman. Ethics for children . . . . . 

Children's hour. Tappan, Eva March, comp. 10 vols. 

Folk stories and fables. Vol. 1. 

Myths from many lands. Vol. 2. 

Stories from the classics. Vol. 3. 

Stori es of 1 egendary heroes. Vol . 4 . 

Stories from seven old f avorites.* Vol. 5. 

Old fashioned stories and poems. Vol. 6. 

Out-of-door book. Vol. 7. 

Adventures and achievements. Vol. 8. 

Poems and rhymes. Vol. 9 

Modern Stories. Vol. 10. 
Eggleston, George Gary. What happened to Quasi; the story of 

a Carolina cruise 

Grey, Zane. The young pitcher 

Hardy, Albertus S. At the home plate 

Holland, Rupert, Sargent. Boy Scouts of Birch Bark Island 
Job, Herbert K. Blue goose chase; a camera-hunting adven- 
ture in Louisiana 



841 . 19 
847.7 

841.5 

847.6 

841 . 18 

847.5 



841 16 
841 . 15 
842 . 14 



841.4 

847.4 

847.10 

841.2 

841.3 



147 



of 



Johnston, Annie Fellows. Little Colonel's Christmas vacation 
Little Colonel's holidays 
Little Colonel's house party .... 

Little Colonel stories 

Mary Ware: the little Colonel's chum 
Mary Ware in Texas 

MacLeod, Mary. Stories from the Faerie Queene 

Major, Charles. The little King; a story of the childhood 
Louis XIV; King of France 

Paine, Ralph D. The wrecking master . ... 

Rolt- Wheeler, Francis. The boy with the U. S. foresters 

Seton, Ernest Thompson. Boy Scouts of America: A handbook 
of woodcraft, scouting, and lifecraft 
Rolf in the woods 

Tappan, Eva March. When Knights were bold . 

Tomlinson, Everett T. Light horse Harry's legion 

White, Eliza Orne. The enchanted mountain 

Young folks library. Vocations. William De Witt Hyde, Editor- 
in-Chief. 10 Vols. 

The Mechanic Arts. Maclaurin, R. C, Editor. Vol. 1. 
Home making. Harland, Marion, Editor. Vol. 2 
Farm and forest. Bailey, L. H., Editor. Vol. 3. 
Business. Carnegie, A., Editor. Vol. 4. 
The professions. Fuller, M. W., Editor. Vol.5. 
Public service. Garfield, J. R., Editor. Vol. 6 
Education. Wooley, Mary Emma., Editor. Vol. 7 
Literature. Van Dyke, Henry, Editor. Vol. 8. 
Musie and drama. Parker Horatio, Editor. Vol. 9. 
Fine Arts. Cox, K., Editor. Vol. 10. 



847.15 
847.14 
847 . 12 
847.11 
847.16 
847.13 
1211.21 

847.8 
847.9 
847.2 

847.1 
841.1 

841,17 
847.3 

841.20 



841.6 

841.7 

841.8 

841.9 

841.21 

841 . 10 

841.11 

841 . 12 

841.13 

841.14 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Autobiography of an elderly woman 

Bennett, Arnold. How to live on twenty-four hours a day 

The human machine 

Mental efficiency ; and other hints to men and women 
Briggs, Le Baron Russell. Girls and education . 
Bruce, H. Addington. Romance of American expansion 

Dawson, W. F. Book of courage 

Eastmen, Charles Alexander. Soul of the Indian 

Fillebrown, C. B. A. B. C. of taxation 

Grenfell, W. T. Down to the sea 

Husband, Joseph. Year in a coal mine 



1337.11 
1532.15 

1337.9 
1536.16 
1536.15 
1532.22 
1536.14 
1532.16 
H537.4 
1532.18 
1532.19 



148 

James, William. Memories and studies. Contents: — Louis 

Agassiz; Address at the Emerson Centenary in Coneord; 

Robert Gould Shaw; Francis Boolt; Thomas 'Davidson; 

A Knight errant of the intellectual life; Herbert Spencer's 

autobiography: Final impressions of a pschical researcher; 

Some mental effects of the earthqake; The energies of 

man: Moral equivalent ofrwar; Remarks at the Peace 

Banquet; Social value of the College bred; The University 

and the individual ; A pluralistic mystic .... 

Lyman, Edna. Story telling; what to tell and how to tell it 1337 . 10 

Rogers, Anna A. Why American marriages fail ; and other papers *1537 . 5 

Steiner, Edward A. Against the current ; simple chapters from a 

complex life . 1537.8 

Stern, R. B. Neighborhood entertainments .... 1537.7 

Tarbell, Ida M. The tariff in our times 1536.17 

Tracy, Susan E. Studies in invalid occupation: A manual for 

nurses and attendants 1532.17 

White, Stewart Edward. The cabin 1537.6 



POETRY. DRAMA. 

Baker, George Pierce. Development of Shakespeare as a drama- 
tist ;436.12 

Maeterlinck. Maurice. The blue bird : A fairy play in six acts . 1436 . 14 
VanDyke, Henry. Poems: Now first collected and revised with 

many hitherto unpublished 1436.13 



PERIODICALS. PAMPHLETS 

Atlantic Monthly. 4 vols. 1909-1910. 

Century Magazine. Vols. 79, 80. 1910. 

Harper's Motnhly Magazine. Vols 120, 121. 1909-1910. 

National Geographic Magazine. *Vols. 20,21. 1909-1910. 

St. Nicholas. Vols. 36 1 , 3Cd 2 , 37\ 37 2 . 1908-1909-1910. 

The Panama Canal Zone. An epochal event in sanitation. 

By Charles F. Adams. (Pamphlet) .... *P. B. 6, 10 

indicates the book was a gift. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1911 




150 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

EDWARD E. BRADLEY, Chairman,Term expires 1912 
EDWARD R. FARRAR, Secretary, " " 1914 

HENRY E. WARNER, " " 1913 

Superintendent of Schools. 
C. S. LYMAN. 

Supervisor of Drawing and Manual Training. 
WALTER F. BRACKET. 

Supervisor of Cooking and Sewing. 
MRS. IRVING SMITH. 

Supervisor of Music. 
MRS. HARRIET J. BARTLETT. 

Teachers. 

Lincoln Grammar Grades VII-VIII. 
CARRIE B. CHAPIN. 

Lincoln Grammar Grades V-VI. 
DOROTHY H. HAVILAND. 

Lincoln Primary Grades III-IV. 
ANNIE L. F. EDWARDS. 

Lincoln Primary Grades I-II. 
HATTIE B. HEATH. 

South Primary Grades I-II-III. 
GERTRUDE E. BROOKS. 

Special Teacher. 
ELIZABETH CUSHING. 

Truant Officer. 
JAMES T. LAIRD. 

Janitors. 
Lincoln. 
EDWARD BANNON. 

South. 
EDMUND R. DAVIS. 






151 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 1911-1912. 

The number of pupils at the Centre School is 137. 
This is a considerable increase and has caused fuller 
class rooms, so that the teacher has not only more pupils 
to teach but the general management of the class room 
requires more of her attention. It is obvious that the 
opportunity for special attention to backward pupils 
and to those who are temporarily in need of extra atten- 
tion is reduced. Children have their ups and downs and 
it is a common thing for most children to have times when 
they are less receptive, or have temporary difficulty in 
keeping up with the class. At such times it is desirable 
to give special attention to such children, not only on 
their own account, but in order that the regular progress 
of the class shall not be retarded, as must be the case if 
any part is lagging behind. 

It is of course necessary to divide the pupils into grades 
or classes, and it is not possible to arrange that all in a 
grade shall have the same aptitude and proficiency. 
Then, too, there come times when a child seems temporar- 
ily to have difficulty with some subject. Such cases 
commonly can be helped by special attention, and the 
child can be specially drilled, or helped over the hard 
places, so that, not only is the particular child enabled 
to go on with its work properly, but the whole class bene- 
fits. It is obvious that the regular teachers cannot give 
much time to such special cases except at the expense of 
the other pupils. The committee has therefore thought 
it advisable to employ a special teacher, who has no 
class room under her charge, and whose work it is to give 
special instruction to those who for any reason are less 



152 

efficient in their work than the rest of the classes. This 
is accomplished, not by withdrawing such pupils from 
their regular work with the class, but by supplementing 
that work by special instruction, or drill, given to such 
scholars, either in groups, or individually. We believe 
that the work of the special teacher will prove to be a 
benefit to the school as a whole, as well as to those pupils 
who directly receive her assistance. 

What is the proper length of time for a child to be 
kept at mental work is a subject which today receives 
much more attention than formerly. Experiments have 
been made, both here and in Europe, and some pretty 
definite conclusions are established as to the time to be 
given to any one subject, the variation of work, the fre- 
quency of recesses and the length of the school session. 
In several places in Massachusetts it has been thought 
beneficial to the scholars, and to the quality of their 
work, to reduce the length of the session. Heretofore 
our session at the Centre School, except for the two lower 
grades has begun at 9 A.M., and has not closed until 
2.30 P.M., a total of five and a half hours a day for five 
days in the week, making a total of twenty-seven and 
one-half hours a week. Of this time three-quarters of an 
hour a day, or three and three-quarters hours a week, 
were used for recesses, leaving twenty-three and three- 
quarters actual working time. In order to make this 
schedule, many children had to leave home by eight 
o'clock, or shortly after, and could not reach home again 
till after three o'clock in the aftrenoon, and most of them 
could have no regular mid-day meal. The efficiency of 
the child for work is much less toward the end of the day, 
and it is a well recognized fact that the hour at the end 
of the school session is not worth as much as that at the 
beginning. 

In a special report of a commission of physicians ap- 
pointed to report on the Boston Schools, in speaking of 



153 

the afternoon session, it is said "During the first hour the 
children are active and attentive, but noticeably less so 
than in the morning session. Yet this hour, the teachers 
feel, is of value. In this first hour the children are 
attentive, and show little evidence of fatigue. The last 
hour is different. In all the grades the pupils become 
restless, inattentive, and show unmistakable signs of 
distress." 

In Chelsea, after the fire, the lack of school accom- 
modations necessitated using the same school houses 
for two schools on the same day, one school using the 
house in the morning, the other in the afternoon, and to 
do this the school session was reduced to four hours. 
Yet it was found that the school work did not suffer, and 
some of the teachers found that they got better results 
from the shorter session than formerly with more time. 
There is a time beyond which children cannot be kept 
at work advantageously, and it is certainly inadvisable 
to keep them after that time. It is not only bad for 
their health, but it is also bad for their work. Children 
should be taught to economize time. A shorter period 
of concentrated effort is worth more than a longer time 
of dawdling, dull or listless work. They should be taught 
to work with a high degree of effort while they are work- 
ing and thus not only accomplish the work to be done, 
but acquire habits of concentration and efficiency. 
When the capacity for work at its best is exhausted, it 
is better to stop altogether, than to dawdle along, dull, 
listless and with an increasing stupidity. The child 
ought not to be worked till it is tired out. To do so not 
only injures the child, but it creates a distaste for school 
and what is taught there, instead of a pleasure and en- 
thusiasm which the school ought to try to create. 

The difficulty is to determine the proper time under 
such conditions as we have in Lincoln. After consider- 
ing such information on the subject as was available, we 



154 

decided to make a trial of shorter hours on three days in 
the week. At present the school session on Monday, 
Tuesday and Friday begins at 8.45 A.M. and ends at 
1.15 P.M. with two recesses each of 15 minutes. On 
Wednesday and Thursday, when the work is varied 
by Manual Training, the session continues till 2.15 P.M. 
with one recess of one-quarter of an hour and another 
recess of three-quarters of an hour. This makes the 
total school sessions for the week amount to twenty-four 
and one-half hours, with a total of three and one-half 
hours' recesses, or twenty-one hours' actual working 
time. While it is too soon to reach definite conclusions 
as to the effect of this change, and further experience 
may make it desirable to make some further modifica- 
tions, we already find indications of improved results. 

The question of transportation of pupils is as trouble- 
some as ever, and has become more expensive. We have 
been obliged to raise the compensation of the two horse 
barges from $12 to $15 a week, and it has also been nec- 
essary to put on an additional one horse barge from the 
South at $10 a week. In our former reports we have re- 
peatedly pointed out the inadequacy and injustice of 
the transportation arrangements, as well as the very 
great proportion of school money expended upon it. 
The difficulties are not likely to decrease, while the ex- 
pense is increasing. 

Inasmuch as no way has been found to carry all the 
children, and the present arrangement is so unsatis- 
factory and expensive, it may well be questioned whether 
it would not be better to give it up altogether, and leave 
it to the parents to take the repsonsibility of getting 
their children to and from school, perhaps giving the 
committee discretion to pay for transportation in special 
cases, where the age of the scholar, the distance from 
school, and the circumstances of the parents, would 
otherwise prevent attendance. The question is one 
which concerns the Town at large, and which it is proper 



155 

for the Town to decide. Without making any recom- 
mendation, the committee suggests that the Town give 
the matter consideration. 

Believing that for some scholars the opportunities 
offered at the Waltham High School might be greater 
than at Concord, we have made arrangements for Lin- 
coln pupils to attend there and the choice between the 
Waltham and the Concord High Schools is now allowed, 
subject to the approval of the committee. This year we 
have five pupils in the Waltham High School, and seven- 
teen in the Concord High School, and both schools report 
that the Lincoln scholars are progressing creditably. 

In order that the children may not be wholly without 
some hot food on the two days when the session lasts 
till 2.15 P.M., we have arranged that on those days hot 
cocoa shall be served free to all the pupils at the noon 
recess. It is prepared in the school building under the 
direction of the cooking teacher. The estimated ex- 
pense is about ten cents a month. While we have not 
wished to make a charge to the scholars for this cocoa, 
we think the expense properly should be met by the 
parents, and we have therefore requested the parents to 
contribute to meet it, having arranged for the present 
to meet any deficit by other private subscription. Should 
experiment prove that the parents think it not of su- 
ficient benefit to trouble to pay for it, it will probably 
be better to discontinue it than to continue it as a private 
charity. We take this opportunity to urge on all parents 
the importance of seeing that children are properly sup- 
plied with food for a mid-day lunch. No matter how 
simple the food may be each child should be provided 
with some lunch. We also wish to discourage the prac- 
tice, which is too frequent, of giving a child a small sum 
of money for luncheon which is usually spent for candy. 

HENRY E. WARNER, 
EDWARD R. FARRAR. 



156 



MINORITY REPORT. 

My object in presenting a Minority Report for the 
School Committee is to express my dissent from the 
action of the Committee in the matter of the change in 
the school session on Monday, Tuesday and Friday, and 
to give the reasons why I disapprove of the plan that has 
been adopted. 

My first objection to a school session that begins at 
8.45 A.M. and continues until 1.15 P.M. with two fifteen 
minute recesses is not that it is too long or too short, but 
that it is not adapted to secure the bests interest of the 
pupils in respect either to their health or their efficiency 
in their work. The second of the two recesses that comes 
from 11.45 to 12.00 o'clock is devoted by some pupils to 
eating their lunch and by others to play. Those who 
eat their lunch properly, as they do on those days when 
a special time is set apart for this purpose, must go with- 
out the exercise and relaxation gained in play; and those 
who spend the recess in play must go without a proper 
lunch. Now neither the pupil who has gone without 
some physical activity and mental diversion nor the 
pupil who has gone without food since an early breakfast 
is in fit condition to return to the school room and do 
good work for another hour and a quarter. The in- 
evitable fatigue that comes with the progress of the day's 
work, and it comes more quickly with children than with 
adults, the plan of session above outlined seems to me to 
help induce rather than to relieve. This plan requires 
pupils to remain in school for four hours and a half 
without providing sufficient change and relaxation to 
enable them to work to the best advantage to the end 
of the school day. 

My second objection to this plan is that it shortens 
the actual working time of the pupils to twenty-one 
hours a week, which I believe to be too short a time in 



157 

which to do the work that pupils ought to do while in 
our schools. I believe as much as any one in teaching 
children to work while they work, and play while they 
play. I believe that the most valuable thing that we can 
do for our pupils is to teach them right methods of study 
and habits of concentration. The Committee are unani- 
mous in their feeling on this matter, and to improve con- 
ditions in this respect is, as I understand it, one of the 
strongest reasons urged for the adoption of the shorter 
school day. But on the other hand, it needs to be re- 
membered that in the instruction of young pupils there 
must always be large dependence upon drill and upon 
freuqent reviews and tests. These require time. There 
are short cuts through special promotions. I believe 
that these are sometimes desirable and should be offered 
to ambitious pupils; but even the ambitious pupil who 
skips the drill work in any subject is bound to miss some- 
thing, and this lack is sure to show. later on; while for 
the average pupil a large amount of drill is indispensable. 

Furthermore, a teacher may often be able to add 
greatly to the interest and profit of a recitation by a few 
moments' digression suggested by some topic in the 
lesson, bringing to the class facts not in the text book or 
giving her interpretaion of the meaning of facts that are 
before their minds, and time ought to be provided during 
the lesson period not only for the teacher to hear what the 
pupils have learned but also for some further direct in- 
struction from the teacher's own lips. Of course it is 
true that the work of instruction can be cut down to any 
number of prescribed hours per week, but I feel strongly 
that cutting down the working time during the week to 
the present limits has been done at the expense of the 
best interests of our pupils. 

When manual training and cooking and sewing were 
added to our curriculum I felt that owing to the nature of 
these subj ects the length of the sessions on the days when 



158 

these subjects were taught might reasonably be somewhat 
increased, as they brought a change from their other work 
and required a certain amount of physical activity. But 
as these subjects are taught only to the upper grades this 
question, as so many questions have been, was com- 
plicated by the barge system that requires all pupils to 
come and go at the same time, with the result that the 
time devoted to these subjects was taken out of the regu- 
lar school session as then in force. Under our present 
schedule the time given to these subjects together with 
drawling by the seventh and eighth grades is three hours 
a week. Subtracting this from the total working time of 
the week leaves eighteen hours for the text book studies 
of these grades, and while our course of study is so ar- 
ranged as to require work at home upon the part of these 
pupils I believe that this is cutting down their time for 
text book instruction altogether too much. 

My objections to the plan of the Committee would be 
removed by adopting for every day in the week the ar- 
rangement of session now in operation on Wednesday 
and Thursday. The session begins at 8.45 A. M. and 
closes at 2.15 P.M. with a recess of fifteen minutes at 
10.15 and one of forty-five minutes at 12.00, an arrange- 
ment that divides the school days into three periods of 
one hour and a half each. The first practical benefit of 
this arrangement would be the more adequate provision 
it would make for play and for lunch on all the days of 
the week instead of on two as now. At the end of the 
first period of an hour and a half a recess of fifteen min- 
utes as on other days offers sufficient opportunity for 
relaxation if properly used ; at the present time the pupils 
use it as they will, some getting much benefit from it and 
some getting little. At the close of the second hour and a 
half period the pupils require a larger measure of relaxa- 
tion, and the use that is made of this forty-five minutes 
goes far toward meeting this need. It allows those 



159 

pupils who live in the vicinity of the school to go home 
to dinner. For those who remain at school the first ten 
minutes gives opportunity for free play, one object of 
which is to get the blood into circulation and to prepare 
the system for food; the next fifteen minutes is lunch 
time, during which time the pupils sit down and eat their 
lunch together; the remaining twenty minutes is devoted 
to organized play under the direction of the teachers. 
Some of the advantages of ogranized play are that it 
secures the patricipation of all the pupils, everyone is in 
the game, there is no one standing around watching others 
play; it is real play kept going all the time for the twenty 
minutes; the teachers suggest games to be played but the 
pupils themselves choose what they will play; as the 
teachers are always present the younger and weaker 
children are looked out for, and the very youngest are 
encouraged and taught to play together. After forty- 
five minutes spent in this way the pupils return to the 
school room physically and mentally refreshed and in good 
condition to go to work. 

Another advantage of adopting this arrangement of 
the session for every day is that an hour and a half would 
be added to the working time of the week, making a 
total of twenty-two and a half hours, which I believe is 
the least amount of time we ought to have. 

I will add that while I approve of the employment of a 
special teacher to work with pupils outside of the class- 
room, I do not feel that the expense is justified by having 
her devote her time wholly to pupils who for any reason 
find it difficult to keep up with their classes. All pupils 
should share the benefit of this individual instruction, 
and it should be this teacher's duty to try to teach every 
pupil who goes through our schools how to study. 

EDWARD E. BRADLEY. 



Kit) 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 

To the School Committee of the Town of Lincoln: — 

In presenting my fifth annual report I am glad to state 
that the Lincoln schools have been making steady im- 
provement and are in excellent condition. The spirit 
and discipline are for the most part so good that the 
schools are running as smoothly as well-oiled machinery. 
The teachers work faithfully and try to make each year 
better than the preceding year. The pupils are quick 
to respond and show much interest in the work. 

Better methods used in teaching reading during the 
past four years enable the children to learn to read 
much earlier and with greater ease. 

By teaching the free arm movement in penmanship 
better results are being obtained in this subject. 

Efforts are continually made to increase the facilty 
and accuracy of work in the fundamental processes of 
arithmetic. This, with a larger application of numbers 
to live topics and elimination of absurd, useless or ob- 
solete problems, enables the pupils to make more progress 
and get a better grasp of what is really valuable in this 
subject. There is a growing feeling among educators 
that the number of subjects taught in arithmetic should 
be greatly decreased, and that those lines of work re- 
tained in the grades should be those most used b}^ people 
in every day transactions. This means the omitting of 
much material in the text books and substituting ex- 
amples and problems which are common in the com- 
munity. Then these practical subjects should be more 
thoroughly taught. This greatly increases the interest 



161 

in the work and the efficiency of the children in the use of 
numbers. 

Our geography work continues to. be well handled by 
the teachers and is thoroughly enjoyed by the pupils. A 
revision of the course of study in this important subject 
has been made, typewritten, and placed in the hands of 
the teachers. I have had many calls for copies of this 
course from other superintendents. 

The foundation of all this work is home geography, the 
things the children see all about them. Their first maps 
are of the region near the school house, and they are 
drawn from actual observation. The first occupations 
and industries studied are those in our own Town. Then 
as we come to the study of cities, countries and land and 
water forms far away (and most geographical study must 
take us far away from home) we are able to interpret 
and understand these unseen places by comparison and 
contrast with what we already know, and by an intelli- 
gent use of pictures and maps. 

We try to make the work in history so practical and 
interestnig that the students can apply the lessons 
learned to the present and future problems in their own 
civic life. This method of study makes history of great 
human interest and not the mere acquisition of dry facts. 
So, throughout the academic work we try to put life into 
each s udy. 

For the past two or three years we have subscribed 
for forty copies of Current Events, a little weekly news- 
paper for school use. This paper gives a concise ac- 
count of the most important news especially those events 
which are of historical importance. The pupils read 
these papers, and at least once a week the classes talk 
about the great events and look up on their maps the 
places about which they read. For the benefit of both 
teachers and pupils we have the World's Work and the 
National Geographical Magazine. These magazines 



162 

not only have many excellent articles on events of great 
interest and importance, but they contain many very 
valuable illustrations which aid the children greatly in 
their study of history and geography. The events of 
the day are history in the making and are often of greater 
moment and interest to us than many of the facts which 
we study about in our text books. I believe the study 
of these periodicals will do much toward the formation 
of good habits of newspaper and magazine reading, and 
that it will influence some to select the better class of 
periodical reading. They are great possibilities for good 
in this line of work and it could be extended with profit. 

The Manual Work. 

The manual w T ork continues to be of great value to 
our boys and girls. The earnest purpose developed in 
this work, the practical knowledge gained, the skill ac- 
quired in handling tools, the ability to make things 
useful in the home, all tend toward a more complete 
education, which the schools of today must give the 
children. 

Mr. Brackett has continued to teach drawing to 
all the pupils and basketry and sloyd to the boys of 
Grades V to VIII inclusive. I quote the following 
from his report: "The sloyd work has been continued 
on the same general lines as last year. A steady im- 
provement can be seen, not only in the work, but the 
manner in which the pupils comprehend the work. 
The seventh and eighth grades made many useful and 
practical articles for their homes the past year, includ- 
ing revolving book cases, folding work tables, jardiniere 
stands, umbrella stands and stools with cane seats. 
They also have completed and put up baseball back stop, 
basket ball goals, and see saws for the younger children. 
This work was begun last year. They made a large solid 



163 

table for the cooking room, a kindergarten table for Miss 
Heath's room and a sand box for Miss Brooks. 

The amount of time given to drawing is not such as to 
give the best results. Fair progress has been made, how- 
ever, and considerable interest developed. Many use- 
ful home articles have been made and ornamented by the 
children's designs, including school bags, embroidered 
collars and lamp shades." 

Sewing and Cooking. 

The three higher grades continue to do good work in 
sewing. The girls in Grade VII have made aprons for 
themselves and boys' blouses for their brothers. The 
girls in Grade VIII have cut out and made dresses for 
themselves and have learned how to use the sewing- 
machine. The younger girls have learned some of the 
stitches in making a few simple articles; they have also 
made baskets and mats from reed and raphia. 

During the early fall Mrs. Smith had the girls make 
jellies and do canning and pickling. Some of these pro- 
ducts were kept for the winter work, others were sold 
and the proceeds used to purchase cook books. 

The afternoon of February 22, 1911, the members of 
the Board of Selectmen and School Committee and the 
Superintendent of Schools assembled at the Lincoln 
School building at the invitation of the girls in Grades 
VII and VIII. After inspecting the building and the 
children's work, which was on exhibition, they sat down 
at the table made by the older boys, covered with linen 
hemmed by the girls and partook of a most excellent 
dinner, prepared and served by the girls. Most of the 
expense of this dinner was derfayed by these pupils, 
the vegetables coming from their homes. The dinner 
was pronounced a great success, and teacher and pupils 
were given the praise they so well deserved. 



164 

Menu. 

Grape Fruit. 

Tomato Soup Crisp Crackers 

Broiled Halibut Maitre d' Hotel Sauce Potato Balls 

Roast Lamb Mashed Potatoes Creamed Onions 
Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce Mint Jelly Muffins 
Lettuce Salad Cream Cheese Balls 
French Vanilla Ice Cream 
Chocolate Cake Nut Cake Candy. 

Coffee. 

Home Gardens. 

The children continued their home garden work, but 
owing to the very dry season some of their crops were a 
failure. In spite of this failure they are ready to try 
again next year, thus they have learned the lesson to 
persevere in spite of adversity. A few good vegetables 
were brought in to our exhibit in September, but they 
did not compare well with the exhibit a year ago. We 
hope to do better next year. I believe the home garden 
work is worth much to the children. 

The Special Teacher. 

When school opened in September there were more 
children in two rooms than there were seats. We 
placed a few extra seats and desks in one room and trans- 
ferred part of the third grade to the lowest room. This 
gave much additional work to Miss Heath. Some of the 
grades were divided into two divisions. An extra teacher 
was engaged to aid the other teachers, to teach pupils 
how to study, and to help small groups of backward 
children to catch up with their classes in the studies 
which troubled them. We can already see good results 
from Miss Cushing's work. The pupils are gaining 



165 

better habits of study, and are learning how to concen- 
trate their minds on the lessons; this enables them to do 
their work in less time than formally. Some of the 
children, who had fallen behind their classes in one or 
more subjects, have made up their work. A few, who 
were far ahead of their class, have been able to go into a 
higher grade. The regular teachers have also done 
much towards getting their pupils into studious habits 
and speeding up their work. This means economy of 
time. 

Most of the teachers report, that the experiment of 
shortening the school session three days a week and clos- 
ing at 1.15 P.M. is working well. They say that the 
children work rapidly and energetically and show little 
fatigue. 

Supervised Play. 

On Wednesdays and Thursdays we continue the session 
until 2.15 P.M., as the work is varied with sloyd, drawing, 
cooking and sewing classes. On these days the second 
recess is from 12 M. to 12.45 P.M., divided as follows: 
for ten minutes the children are free ; for fifteen or twenty 
minutes they are in the basements eating their lunch, at 
which time they are furnished with hot cocoa served by 
the older boys and girls; the remaining twenty minutes 
are spent in supervised^play. The children are divided 
into groups and the teachers instruct them how to play a 
variety of games, which give both pleasure and helpful 
exercise. This instruction is continued at recess on the 
short session days. A friend of the school has furnished 
us with medicine balls, volley balls, hand balls and in- 
door base balls ; and the sewing and sloyd classes are mak- 
ing other materials for the games. 

After these games in the fresh air the children come in 
with faces aglow, blood circulating freely and with new 
life for school work. In too many of our sports, even on 



166 

the school grounds, a few play and the others look on. 
The supervised play has these great aims: to get all the 
children into the games, to see that each one gets the 
needed helpful exercise, to inculate fair play and team 
work, in a word to develop all the children along right 
lines physically, mentally and morally. 

High Schools. 

Feeling that some of our children needed a different 
line of work from that offered at the Concord High School 
we advised part of the entering class to attend the High 
School at Waltham. Five pupils therefore entered the 
Waltham High School last September and are continuing 
their courses in woodworking and domestic science. 
The other seventeen high school pupils are at Concord. 
The principals of both schools give a good report of their 
progress. 

How to Eliminate Waste. 

Our reports are optimistic, but the condition of our 
schools and their slow but sure improvement year by 
year warrant this optimism. Nevertheless, we can see 
their faults and the great need of further improvement. 
In fact, as compared with the ideal school our schools are 
not more than fifty per cent, efficient. But the ideal 
school does not yet exist, and is far away in the future. 
Our great endeavor is to find and correct the faults as 
fast as possible, and to study up and apply more effective 
methods of work in order that the children may gain the 
greatest amount of development within their capacity. 

For a long time keen business men have spent great 
effort and much money to eliminate the waste from their 
business, and to reduce the management of their affairs 
to a scientific basis. Frederick W. Taylor and his asso- 
ciates after thirty years of persistent study and ex- 



167 

perimenting have been successful to a remarkable degree. 
In some lines of work they have even doubled and tripled 
the productive efficiency of both men and machines by 
scientific management. They have made many experi- 
ments at large cost, wasting thousands of dollars' worth of 
material, and have spent much time in teaching their 
workmen the most economical way to perform their 
labors with a minimum expenditure of time and energy. 
But so successful have been their efforts that their recent 
profits much more than pay for all the losses which their 
experiments entailed. The results of their experiments 
have been so remarkable that Mr. Taylor's methods are 
being studied and adapted to business in many parts of 
the country. 

For many years the best schoolmen everywhere have 
felt that we needed more efficient methods of teaching 
and of study to eliminate the waste and make our 
schools more helpful to the boys and girls. 

Professor William James says, " Compared with what 
we ought to be we are only half awake. Our fires are 
damped, our drafts are checked, we are making use of 
only a small part of our possible mental and physical 
resources. 

"We may say that a man who energises below his 
normal maximum fails by just so much to profit by his 
chances in life ; and that a nation filled with such men is 
inferior to a nation run at higher pressure. The problem 
is, then, how can men be trained up to their useful pitch 
of energy? And how can nations make such training 
most accessible to all their sons and daughters?" 

The problem of training our children to become efficient 
men and women is much more complex and much less 
under central control than the problems worked out by 
Mr. Taylor, therefore it will require more experiments 
and a longer time for thorough solution. But men at 
the head of public school systems and others in the uni- 



168 

versities are working dilligently on this problem, there- 
fore we may confidently look for a successful solution 
and feel sure that the schools will gradually improve 
under a more scientific management. 

We endeavor from the very beginning to train the 
children in good habits of study and to prevent dawdling 
over their tasks. Some teachers have been so successful 
in this work as greatly to increase the efficiency and pro- 
gress of their pupils. I believe the teacher can do no 
more important work than helping children to form good 
habits, for good habits make character. For this service 
alone some teachers are worth twice as much to the Town 
as others. 

By remembering our own childhood days and by an- 
alyzing the causes of our successes and failures, we gain a 
better idea of how best to train the children, and we 
are able to judge more accurately what subjects are best 
for them to study in the different grades. Right here 
many teachers and text books have failed; they have ap- 
proached the child as if he were an adult, and he has 
responded with words, words with little or no meaning 
for him. Because the pupil answers glibly the teacher is 
often deceived and thinks the child has gained something 
of value, when in reality he has recited only empty words. 
We must approach the child on his own ground, find what 
he knows and on that build up the great unknown by 
comparison, contrast and imagination. It is a great 
achievement to teach a child so that he will develop 
rapidly, systematically and sanely, and I am glad to say 
that some of our teachers are achieving a large degree of 
success in this work. 

If children are interested in their work and enjoy it, 
they will learn much more in a shorter time and with less 
fatigue than they will when interest is lacking and the 
work is a task, and the knowledge thus gained will be 
more lasting because it has made a deeper impression. 




169 



In closing I wish to express to the committee my hearty 
thanks for your support and encouragement, and to as- 
sure the teachers that I fully appreciate their earnest 
endeavors to improve the schools. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. S. LYMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



170 



Schedule of School Expenditures, 1910-1911, 

1910-1911 

Supt. and Teachers $4,167 .61 

High School Tuition 1,026 .05 

High School Transportation 398 . 40 

Janitors 628.85 

Water Rates 151.46 

School Supplies 415 .55 

Repairs, etc 180 .03 

Fuel... 473.78 

Miscellaneous 45 .29 

Medical Inspector 200 .00 

$7,687.02 
Barges and Transporation. 1,461 .05 

Total $9,148 .07 $9,756 .87 



1911-1912 


$4,441 


.87 


1,015 


.80 


391 


.24 


627 


.90 


100 


.50 


623 


.96 


64 


.89 


429 


.59 


53 


.21 


200 


.00 


$7,948.96 


1,807 


.91 



171 



REPORT OF SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 

The schools have been particularly free from infectious 
diseases during the year; the buildings kept clean and in a 
sanitary condition and the ventilation good, except on 
days when the fires are out. At these times and occa- 
sionally others, the windows were opened to provide the 
fresh air and remove the perceptible vitiation. 

The individual examinations gave the usual results. 
Of 155 examined 82 had defective teeth; 52 enlarged 
tonsils or adenoids; 13 pediculi and 15 faulty postures. 

Notice was sent to the parents in all pronounced cases 
calling attention to the conditions present and urging 
their care. In other instances personal instruction was 
given where the child could effectively apply the remedy. 

The difficulty still exists of reaching the parents in some 
more effective way in those instances where the children 
most need care and treatment. 

Letters sent home by the children receive scant atten- 
tion and only by persistent effort have any good results 
been obtained. A nurse to visit these homes explain and 
instruct the parents and perhaps take the child for neces- 
sary treatment would accomplish much. 

The good work of the superintendent in this direction 
deserves special commendation, best shown in the follow- 
ing instance. There was one happy looking little fellow, 
a typical mouth breather, quick to observe but unable to 
understand. He couldn't hear what the teacher said. 
During the year he also had a discharging ear, which added 
to his deafness and stupidity, but was kindly cared for by 



172 

his teacher when in school. The mother heeded the 
appeal and had the adenoids removed. Now there is a 
bright lad already advanced a grade since the school 
year began. 

There are others, handicapped in a lesser degree it may 
be, who should receive similar treatment if they are to do 
their best work at school. 

Respectfully, 

HENRY A. WOOD, 

School Physician. 



173 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

The following pupils have been neither absent nor 
tardy for the time designated: — 



Olen A. Jensen. 



Lewis E. Cook. 
Emily M. Robus. 



For Two Years. 

Raymond F. Langille. 

For Five Terms. 
Holgar J. R. Jensen. 

For One Year. 

Esther L. Cousins. 
Alice E. Robus. 



Kate A. Connors. 
Grace Anderson. 
Harold Moulton. 
Joseph F. Eaton. 
Lillian E. Rocks. 
Marie Connors. 



Ralph H. Bamforth 
Elsie B. Davis. 
Doris Farrar. 
Emma Flemming. 
Louise J. Derby. 
Foster Bunker. 
William Bowles. 
Elizabeth Giles. 
Marian Rocks. 
Edward W. Flint, 
Maude Kimber. 
Gladys Wetherbee. 



For Two Terms. 

Redman Hartwell. 
Robert D. Donaldson. 
Carl E. Nelson. 
Edna E. Wetherbee. 
Richard Nelson. 
Mildred Sims. 
Belva Gallent. 

For One Term. 

Edward F. Boyce. 
Margaret F. Collins. 
Ruth Farquhar. 
Wm. C. Peirce, Jr. 
Warren A. Rice. 
Harriet Gilbert. 
Evelyn Cousins. 
Gladys Hamilton. 
Kathleen N. Crook. 
Kenneth C.Hamilton. 
Malcoln Donaldson. 
Arthur Butcher. 
Margaret Frazier. 



174 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 

Winter term begins January 1, 1912, ends March 22: 
twelve weeks. 

Spring term begins April 1, ends June 14; eleven weeks. 

Fall term begins September 3, ends December 13; fifteen 
weeks. 

Winter term begins December 30, 1912, ends March 21, 
1913 ; twelve weeks. 

Spring term begins March 31, ends June 13 ; eleven weeks. 

Recess from Wednesday before Thanksgiving to Monday 
following. 

Holidays: Washington's Birthday, Patriot's Day, Mem- 
orial Day, Columbus Day. 

Length of school year, 38 weeks. 



175 



STATISTICS FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1910-1911 



Number of children in Town, September, 1911, 
between 5 and 15 years: — boys, 97; girls, 94; 
total 

Number of children in Town, September, 1910 

Number of children in Town, September, 1911, 
between 7 and 14 years: — boys, 67; girls 68 
total 

Enrollment for the year, ending June, 1911 

Number between 5 and 15 years of age 

Number over 15 years of age . . 

Number between 7 and 14 years of age . 

Number attending Concord High School 

Number attending Waltham High School 

Number of regular teachers employed . 

Number of special teachers employed . 

Number of teachers who have graduated 
normal schools 

From Training School . . 

Illiterate minors in Town over 14 years of age 

Total number registered in Lincoln schools during 
the year ending June, 1911 . 

Number of pupils sent to High Schools from Lin- 
coln ....... 

Total number receiving instruction at Town expense 



from 



191 
160 



135 

159 

155 

4 

136 

17 

5 

5 

3 

5 

1 


177 

22 

199 





•33b jo sibba" gi 
j9ao sjidnj 


-tf 


o 


o 


o 


o 


rJH 




•g3b jo BjBdiC f\ paw 2, 


to 


o 


00 
CO 


co 

T— t 


i> 


CO 
CO 


M 
M 


•dSB JOSJBdA SI pUB«J 

aaa.\uaq sijcinj 


© 


o 


CO 


CO 
CM 




to 
to 


p 
o 

p 

w 

< 

w 


•aouBpuo^y 
jo -jaaouoj 


CO 

© 


© 

as 


1> 

© 


00 
CM 

© 


O 

© 

as 


© 


•aouBpuaj^v 

33BJ3AV 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


OS 

CO 


as 


00 

T— 1 


id 

CO 

T— 1 


•diqsaaqtnaj/^ 

33BJ8AV 


Oi 

CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


iO 

wo 

CO 


o 


CO 

© 

<M 


© 

CO 


•S|jif) — laatnuojug 


<* 




c 
CM 


CM 

r— ( 


i— I 


OS 
1> 


•sXog — ittamuojug 


© 


00 


00 


^ 


3 


© 
00 


o 
o 


ioj aaauijioauy 


CO 

CO 


o 


00 
CO 


CO 


CM 

CM 


© 

iO 

T-H 


o 

CO 


*\l& n d jo 
isrj; XiBiuauiaiddng 


CO 


(M 


id 


r* 


- 


00 


n 

H 

o 

2 

o 

Q 

w 

H 

5 


3 

05 

e 

o 

o 


£ 
'EL 

o 

PQ 
.® 

Sh 

a 

i— i 
»— i 

►— 1 

> 
1 

1— 1 

H— 1 

> 

'o 

O 
PJ 

• i-H 

h3 


c3 

m 

M 
d 

i— i 

> 

i 

> 

"o 
o 

d 

3 


Lincoln III-IV Annie C. Buck 

Alice M. Clifford 


03 

w 

pq 

'-+3 
+^> 

w 

►— 1 
h— 1 

1 
HH 

O 
O 

3 


South I-III Stella V. Sanborn 

Gertrude E. Brooks 


CO 

o 



177 



WARRANT. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, . on Monday, 
March fourth, next at 1 o'clock P.M., to act on the 
following articles, viz. : 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a moderator. 

ART. 2. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

ART. 3. To choose all necassery Town Officers, Com- 
mittees, Commissioners and Trustees for the ensuing 
year. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and ex- 
pedient purpose of the Town, and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To give in their votes by ballot in answer to 
the question: " Shall licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in this Town?" The check list 
shall be used as provided by Section 5, Chapter 100 of 
the Public Statutes. 



178 

ART. 0. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 8. To see of the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow dur- 
ing the municipal year, beginning February first, 1912, in 
anticipation of the collection of taxes of said year, such 
sums of money as may be necessary for the Current 
expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax 
levy for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in 
payment thereof, payable in one year from the dates 
thereof; all debts incurred under authority of this vote 
shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3 of Article 9 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will appoint a com- 
mittee to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors 
in the Town, and appropriate money for the same. 

ART. 11. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to the old schoolhouse in the center of the Town. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will accept the provision 
of Chapter 244 of the Acts and Resolves of the year 1911, 
or take any action with reference to the matter. 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will accept the provi- 
sions of the Revised Laws of Chapter 78 and particularly 
Sections 21 to 25 of said Acts, which refer to cemeteries. 



179 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will instruct the Tree 
Warden, under the direction of the Selectmen, to set 
shade and ornamental trees in different parts of the Town 
along the highways and appropriate the sum of $200 
for this purpose. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from a point on the Waltham Road, known as Kid- 
der's Corner, to a point on the same road near the house 
of Mrs. Albert Washburn, or take any action with refe- 
rence to said extension or make any appropriation for 
the same. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the electric 
lighting system from a point near the house of Kidder 
Brothers to the estate of Mrs. Albert Washburn, or take 
any action with reference to the matter or make appro- 
priations for the same. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town will appropriate the 
sum of $200 to purchase hose for fire protection in the 
East part of the Town, or take any action with reference 
to the matter. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will name the street 
running from a point opposite the house of Mr. John F. 
Farrar to the Wayland Line, or take any action with 
reference to the matter. 

ART. 19. To see if the Town will extend a 4 inch 
water main from a point opposite the house of John F. 
Farrar to a point near the residence of Vernon A. Wright, 
and appropriate money for the same or take any action 
with reference to the matter. 

ART. 20. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to any suits now pending against it. 



180 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches or some other public place, seven 
days at least before the day appointed for such meeting, 
and to make seasonable return thereof with your doings, 
thereon, to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-first day of February, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
twelve. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
C. L. TODD, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



The Acts referred to in Articles XII and XIII are 
printed herewith. 



181 



CHAPTER 244 
ACTS AND RESOLVES OF 191 1 

An Act Relative to Fires in the Open Air 

Section 1. Chapter two hundred and nine of the acts 
of the year nineteen hundred and eight is hereby amended 
by striking out section one and inserting in place thereof 
the following: — Section 1. It shall be unlawful within 
any city, or within any town which accepts the provisions 
of this act, for any person to set a fire in the open air 
between the first day of March and the first day of De- 
cember except by the written permission of the forest 
warden, or the chief of the fire department, or, in cities 
that have such an official, the fire commissioner: provided 
that debris from fields, gardens and orchards, or leaves 
and rubbish from yards may be burned on ploughed fields 
by owners thereof, their agents or lessees; and provided, 
further, that persons above eighteen years of age may 
maintain a fire for a reasonable purpose upon sandy or 
barren land, if the fire is enclosed within rocks, metal or 
other non-inflammable material. In every case such 
fire shall be at least two hundred feet distant from any 
forest or sprout lands, and at least fifty feet distant from 
any building, and shall be properly attended until it is 
extinguished. The forest warden shall cause public 
notice to be given of the provisions of this section, and 
shall enforce the same. Whoever violates the provisions 
of this section shall be punished by a fine of not more than 
one hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more 
than one month, or by both such fine and imprisonment. 

Section 2. Said chapter two hundred and nine is here- 
by further amended by striking out section four and 



182 

inserting in place thereof the following: — Section 4. The 
state forester and forest warden, or any duly authorized 
assistant in the employ of the state forester, or any duly 
appointed deputy forest warden, may arrest without a 
warrant any person found in the act of setting or main- 
taining a fire in violation of the provisions of this act. 

Section 3. Said chapter is hereby further amended 
by striking out section five and inserting in place thereof 
the following new section: — Section 5. The selectmen 
of every town may submit this act to the voters for their 
acceptance at any annual or special town meeting. The 
vote shall be taken by separate ballot, and shall be "Yes" 
or u No" in answer to the following question printed upon 
the ballot: " Shall an act passed by the general court in 
the year nineteen hundred and eight, entitled 'An Act to 
provide for the protection of forest or sprout lands from 
fire/ be accepted by this town?" A majority vote of the 
legal voters present and voting at such meeting shall be 
required for the acceptance of this act; and upon such 
acceptance the provisions of section twenty-four, of 
chapter thirty-two of the Revised Laws shall cease to 
apply to any town which has previously accepted that 
section. 

Section 4. Section eleven of chapter two hundred and 
eleven of the Revised Laws is hereby repealed. 

Section 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 



183 



BOARDS OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Chapter 78. 

Section 21. A town which accepts the provsions of 
this and the four following sections or has accepted the 
corresponding provisions of earlier laws may, at any town 
meeting, elect by ballot a board of cemetery commission- 
ers consisting of three persons, a majority of whom shall, 
for at least one year previous to their election, have been 
owners of a lot in a cemetery or other public burial ground 
in said town. If such board is first chosen at a meeting 
other than an annual town meeting, one member shall be 
elected for one year from the day following that fixed by 
law for the last preceding annual town meeting, one mem- 
ber for two years, and one member for three years, from 
said day ; and annually thereafter one member so qualified 
shall, at the annual town meeting, be elected by ballot 
for a term of three years. Such boards shall choose a 
chairman, and a clerk who may be a member of the board. 

Section 22. Said board shall have the sole care, super- 
intendence and management of all public burial grounds 
in its town, may lay out any existing public burial 
grounds in its town or any land purchased and set apart 
by said town for cemeteries and other public burial 
grounds in lots or other suitable subdivisions with proper 
paths and avenues, may plant, embellish, ornament and 
fence the same and erect therein such suitable edifices and 
conveniences and make such improvements as it con- 
siders convenient; and, subject to the approval of the 
town, may make such regulations, not inconsistent with 
law, as it considers expedient. 



184 

Section 23. Said board may, by deed made and exe- 
cuted in such manner and form as it may prescribe, con- 
vey to any person the sole and exclusive right of burial 
in any lot in said cemetery and of erecting tomfts, ceno- 
taphs and other monuments or structures thereon upon 
such terms and conditions as its regulations prescribe. 
Such deeds and all subsequent deeds of such lots made by 
the owners thereof shall be recorded by said board in 
suitable books of record, which shall be open to the pub- 
lic at all reasonable times. 

Section 24. A town in which cemetery commssioners 
are chosen may receive gifts or bequests for maintaining 
cemeteries or cemetery lots, which shall be paid into the 
town treasury of said town, and with the accounts there- 
of, shall be kept separate from the other money and ac- 
counts of said town. The town treasurer shall invest 
all such funds in accordance with the stipulations, if 
any, accompanying them ; otherwise he shall invest them 
as ordered by the selectmen and said commissioners and 
pay the income thereform upon their order or with their 
approval. The proceeds of sales of lots or rights of 
burial in said cemetery shall be paid into the town treas- 
ury and shall be subject to said orders. 

Section 25. Said board shall not incur debts or lia- 
bilities for purposes other than aforesaid nor to an amount 
exceeding the amount of the funds subject to their order; 
and it shall annually make a report in writing to said town 
of its official acts, of the condition of said cemetery and 
burial grounds, and render an account of its receipts and 
expenditures for the same and of the funds subject to 
its order. 



185 



By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Middlesex, ss. 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 
of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897, 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to w T it: — 

"ARTICLE I. 

Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on 
the first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving a 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 
**>wn, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or at- 
tached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 



186 

ARTICLE II. 

Finances. 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence vnch the 
first day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the ac- 
count to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall be 
sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month, 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them th 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer h 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 
approve in writing all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such approbation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to whom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 



187 

glial 1 be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
sums by law payable from the treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds, rot'- 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section 
Such drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be trans 
initted by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accom- 
panied by the approved bills or other documents for the 
settlement of which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. 6. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap- 
proved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes scrip, and otlier 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. No draft shall be drawn by tne selectmen un- 
less there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except 
for sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, 
final judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the 
rown and interest thereon, and money payable to the com 
missioners of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shal' 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
** countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they shall 
incur no further expenditure, except in cases where siv ' 
expenditure may be required by law; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the in- 



188 

terval between the thirty-first day of January in each year 
and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
m order to meet the liabilities of their several dpartments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditure and liability incurred for any pur- 
pose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount appro 
pj-iated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise 
vote, no extension of water pipes shall be made unless be 
fore the work of construction is begun one or more of the 
persons whom it is proposed to supply with water by means 
of such extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with 
sureties satisfactory to the water commissioners, condi- 
tioned to pay to the town for five years next following the 
completion of such extension and the letting of water into 
the same, a sum sufficient, together with the net annual in 
come from such extension, to amount annually to five per 
centum of the total cost thereof. 



ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be: a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct: in 1754 as a Town;" in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall ; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln; 
in saltire two shepherd's crooks; the device thereof being as 
follows: 



189 

Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, 
given or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be 
sealed with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town 
by a majority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a bool 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and othei 
instruments to which the town is a party except such in- 
struments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of 
Deeds; and it shall be the duty of any board or officer exe 
cuting or receiving such written contract, or other instru- 
ment, to deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for 
the purpose of record. It shall be the duty of the town 
t lerk to see that all conveyances of real estate to the town 
are properly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of *JLl town re- 
ports, reports of all committees chosen by the tow and all 
original documents relating to the affairs of the tow which 
may come into his possession. 

ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Sect ion 1. Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



190 
ARTICLE VI. 

Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds |200.00. 

8ect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may. be expedient to do so, 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the pro- 
tection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose, a committee on claims, such committee 
shall have and exercise exclusively all the powers and 
duties conferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding 
sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the town seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town 
officers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devises, bequests and donations to the town during the 



191 

preceding year; a list of all laws of the commonwealth ac 
cepted by the town during the year; all by-laws adopted by 
the town since the preceding annual report; copies of the 
laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance of 
any highway or townway within the limits of the town dur- 
ing the preceding year; and a statement of all outstanding 
bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the payment 
uf money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

* Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 

child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the 
town having no lawful occupation or business, not attend 
ing school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children 
as persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations 
of the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be com- 
mitted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelms- 
ford, Mass., or to any other place provided by the town 
within its limits, for confinement, instruction, and disci- 
pline. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 



192 

after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having 
been requested by the owner or any occupant of the 
premises or by any constable or police officer to remove 
r.lierefrom. 

Sect. 4. No person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. No person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or 
way, without proper authority to do so. 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
effense, a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, ap- 
proved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
of record. I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



193 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers, 1911-1912 3-5 

Proceedings of Town Meetings, 1911-1912 7-31 

Town Clerk's Report 32-35 

Recommendations for Appropriations 37-38 

Selectmen's Report 37-45 

Auditor's Report 36 

Expenditures for the year 46-62 

Report of Assessors 84-100 

Report of Town Treasurer 70 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund 71 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds .... 72-80 

Report of Treasurer Geo. F. Bemis Lecture Fund . . . 81-82 

Report of Treasurer Cemetery Commissioners 112 

Report of Water Commissioners 101-111 

Report of Tree Warden 113-114 

Report of Board of Health 83 

Report of Supt. of Streets 65-69 

Report of Inspector of Animals 63 

Report of Fire Engineers 64 

Report of Committee on Claims 115-116 

Abstract of Title 117-135 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library .... 136-139 

Library Statistics 141 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 140 

Report of Librarian 142 

List of Accessions to Library 143-148 

School Reports 149-176 

School Expenditures 170 

Report of School Committee 151-155 

School Calendar and Statistics 174-175 

Roll of Honor 173 

Tabular Statement 176 

Warrant, 1912 177-184 

By-Laws of the Town 185-191 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From February 1, 1912, to February 1, 1913 

ALSO THE 

Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THE YEAR 1912-1913 




BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS. 

394 Atlantic Avenue. 

1913 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



From February 1, 1912, to February 1, 1913 



ALSO THE 



Reports of the School and other Committees 



FOR THE YEAR 1912-1913 




BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS. 

394 Atlantic Avenue. 

1913 



Town Officers, 1912-1913 



Town Clerk. 
GEORGE L. CHAPIN. 

Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, CHARLES LEE TODD, 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

Board of Health. 

R. D. DONALDSON Term expires 1915 

MARTIN M. WELCH " " 1913 

EDWARDS W. HERMAN " " 1914 

Assessors. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER Term expires 1915 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE " " 1913 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN " " 1914 

Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Auditor. 
JAMES W. LENNON. 

Constables. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, WINSLOW A. EATON, 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM. 

Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

CHARLES S. SMITH ...... Term expires 1915 

C. LEE TODD " " 1913 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1914 



4 

Tree Warden. 
JOHN J. KELLIHER. 

Committee on Claims. 
MOORFIELD STOREY, JULIUS E. EVELETH, 

CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

GEORGE FLINT Term expires 1915 

C. LEE TODD " " 1913 

JULIUS E EVELETH " " 1914 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER, GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH. 

Trustees of Lincoln Library, 

CHARLES F. ADAMS. JOHN F. FARRAR, 

CHARLES LEE TODD, 
CHARLES S. SMITH, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 

Registrars. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

C. LEE TODD, GEORGE L. CHAPIN. 

School Committee. 

ELIZABETH BLODGETT Term expires 1915 

EDWARD R. FARRAR " " 1913 

HENRY E. WARNER " '• 1914 

Water Commissioners. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN Term expires 1915 

JOSEPH S. HART " " 1913 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN " " 1914 



5 



Field Drivers. 



ALBERT S. GRAVES, JAMES M. MERRILL, 

GEO. G. TARBELL. HENRY A. BUTCHER. 



Fence Viewers. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, WM. H. SHERMAN. 



Surveyors of Lumber. 
RICHARD A. SHEPARD. 

Measures of Wood and Bark. 

SAMUEL FARRAR, HAROLD S. COUSINS, 

JOHN F. FARRAR. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN Term expires 1915 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1913 

JOSEPH S. HART " " 1914 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Proceedings at the Annual Meeting, March 4, 1912 

WARRANT. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Monday, 
March fourth, at 1 o'clock P.M., to act on the following 
articles, viz.: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a moderator. 

ART. 2. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

ART. 3. To choose all necessary Town Officers, Com- 
mittees, Commissioners and Trustees for the ensuing 
year. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and ex- 
pedient purposes of the Town, and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 



8 

ART. 5. To give in their votes by ballot in answer to 
the question: "Shall licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in this Town?" The check list 
shall be used as provided by Section 5, Chapter 100 of 
the Public Statutes. 

ART. 6. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow dur- 
ing the municipal year, beginning February first, 1912, in 
anticipation of the collection of taxes of said year, such 
sums of money as may be necessary for the Current 
expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax 
levy for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in 
payment thereof, payable in one year from the dates 
thereof; all debts incurred under authority of this vote 
shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3 of Article 9 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will appoint a com- 
mittee to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors 
in the Town, and appropriate money for the same. 

ART. 11. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to the old schoolhouse in the center of the Town. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will accept the provision 
of Chapter 244 of the Acts and Resolves of the year 1911, 
or take any action with reference to the matter. 



9 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will accept the provi- 
sions of the Revised Laws of Chapter 78 and particularly 
Sections 21 to 25 of said Acts, which refer to cemeteries. 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will instruct the Tree 
Warden, under the direction of the Selectmen, to set 
shade and ornamental trees in different parts of the Town 
along the highways and appropriate the sum of $200 
for this purpose. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from a point on the Waltham Road, known as Kid- 
der's Corner, to a point on the same road near the house 
of Mrs. Albert Washburn, or take any action with ref- 
erence to said extension or make any appropriation for 
the same. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the electric 
lighting system from a point near the house of Kidder 
Brothers to the estate of Mrs. Albert Washburn, or take 
any action with reference to the matter or make appro- 
priations for the same. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town will appropriate the 
sum of $200 to purchase hose for fire protection in the 
East part of the Town, or take any action with reference 
to the matter. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will name the street 
running from a point opposite the house of Mr. John F. 
Farrar to the Wayland Line, or take any action with 
reference to the matter. 

ART. 19. To see if the Town will extend a 4 inch 
water main from a point opposite the house of John F. 
Farrar to a point near the residence of Vernon A. Wright, 
and appropriate money for the same or take any action 
with reference to the matter. 



10 

ART. 20. To see what action the Town will take with 
reference to any suits now pending against it. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches or some other public place, seven 
days at least before the day appointed for such meeting, 
and to make seasonable return thereof with your doings, 
thereon, to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-first day of February, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
twelve. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



The return of this Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, Feb. 24, 1912. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy, one in each of the Post Offices and one in the Rail- 
road Station seven days before said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 



Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Town Clerk, who read the Warrant. 
The following votes were then passed: 

ARTICLE 1. Voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. (The check list was used. ) 



11 

ART. 2. All of the reports of the various officers 
and committees printed in the Town Report were ac- 
cepted. 

ART. 3. Voted and chose: 

Town Clerk. — George L. Chapin, sworn. 

Selectmen. — 

Charles S. Smith, sworn. 

C. Lee Todd, sworn. 

Robert D. Donaldson, sworn. 

Overseers of the Poor. — Voted, To omit choosing. 

Board of Health. — 3 years. Robert D. Donaldson. 

Assessor. — 3 years. Charles S. Wheeler, sworn. 

Town Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. — Charles S. 
Wheeler, sworn. 

Auditor. — James W. Lennon. 

Constables. — 

James T. Laird, sworn. 

Winslow A. Eaton, sworn. 

George E. Cunningham, sworn. 

Commissioner of Trust Funds. — 3 years. Charles S. 
Smith. 

Tree Warden. — John J. Kelliher. 



12 

Trustee of Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. — 
3 years. George Flint. 

School Committee. — 3 years. Elizabeth Blodgett. 

Water Commissioner. — 3 years. William H. Sherman. 

Field Drivers. — 

Albert S. Graves. 
George G. Tarbell, sworn. 
James M. Neville, sworn. 
Ralph E. Butcher. 
Henry A. Butcher, sworn. 

Fence Viewers. — 

John F. Farrar, sworn. 
William H. Sherman, sworn. 

Trustee of Grammar School Fund. — 

In place of Herbert E. Barnes, deceased, George L. 
Chapin. 

In place of Charles F. Eveleth, removed from town, 
Julius E. Eveleth. 

These last two vacancies were filled at the adjourned 
meeting held March 9. 

Surveyor of Lumber. — Richard A. Shepard. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. — 

Samuel Farrar, sworn. 
Harold S. Cousins, sworn. 
John F. Farrar, sworn. 



13 



Cemetery Commissioners.— 

George L. Chapin, 3 years. 
Joseph S. Hart, 2 years. 
Julius E. Eveleth, 1 year. 

Committee on Claims. — 

Moorfield Storey. 
Julius E. Eveleth. 
Charles S. Wheeler. 

ART. 4. The following appropriations were made: 

Schools, including transportation of High 

School pupils 

Transportation of children .... 
Highways and Bridges . . . 

Support of Poor 

Library. The Dog Tax and 

Interest 

Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth Work . 

State Aid 

Miscellaneous Expenses .... 
Payment of Water Bonds. (To be taken 

from Water Works' Treasury ) . 
Water Works' Sinking Fund. (To be taken 

from Water Works' Treasury ) 
Hydrant and other Public Water Service . 
Waltham Hospital. Free Bed . 
Street Lamps . . . 

Fire Department 

Payment of Schoolhouse Bonds 

Payment of interest on Schoolhouse Bonds 

Suppression of Liquor Nuisance . 

Lee's Bridge 

ART. 5. Voted, That the Town Clerk cast one No 
Ballot for the Town. 



$8,000.00 


2,500.00 


7,500.00 


500.00 


400.00 


500.00 


2,000.00 


8.00 


4,500.00 


2,000.00 


2,173.37 


2,400.00 


250.00 


1,300.00 


300.00 


3,000.00 


1,720.00 


200.00 


4,000.00 



14 

The polls were kept open one hour, and the Check 
List and Ballot Box used. 

Upon opening the Ballot Box, one No Ballot was dis- 
closed, and the vote announced to the Town as follows: 

Yes, 0. No, 1. 

ART. 6. Voted, To collect the taxes in the same way 
and manner as last year. 

ART. 7. Voted, That the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes be 1J% of the amount collected. 

ART. 8. Voted, That the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the taxes of the municipal year beginning Feb. 1, 1912, 
to an amount not exceeding in the aggregate Thirty 
thousand dollars ($30,000 ) and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year. Any debt or debts 
incurred under this vote to be paid from the taxes of 
said municipal year. 

ART. 9. Voted, To choose a Committee on Claims. 

ART. 13. Voted, That all acts heretofore accepted 
and all votes heretofore passed, in any way affecting the 
control or care of the cemeteries of the Town, and the 
officers or trustees elected thereunder, are hereby 
rescinded. 

Voted, That the Towm accept the provisions of Re- 
vised Laws, Chapter 78, Sections 21 to 25 inclusive, and 
elect three Trustees of Cemeteries, who shall hold office, 
one for one year, one for two years, and one for three 
years. 

ART. 14. Voted, To appropriate $200 for the pur- 
pose mentioned in the Article. 



15 

After passing the above votes, the meeting adjourned 
to Saturday, Nov. 9, at 7.30 o'clock. 

Immediately upon the calling to order of the adjourned 
meeting, the Moderator, Charles S. Wheeler, offered the 
following resolutions, which were unanimously adopted 
by a rising vote: 

Whereas, God in His Infinite Wisdom, has in the 
interim of the adjournament of this Town Meeting, re- 
moved one of our citizens. 

Resolved, That in the death of Mr. Herbert E. Barnes, 
this Town has lost a citizen of worth and judgment: 
whose interest in public affairs was always keen, and who 
in his many years of service as Cemetery Commissioner, 
devoted much thought and care to the improvement 
and beautifying of our cemeteries. 

Resolved, That we, in Town Meeting assembled, ex- 
press our deep sense of loss, and extend our sympathy 
to Mrs. Barnes. 

ART. 10. Voted, That the Selectmen be a Commit- 
tee to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors in 
this Town. 

ART. 11. Voted, To recommit the matter of the old 
schoolhouse to the Committee on Claims to further 
investigate, obtain a survey and report to the Town at a" 
meeting to be held on or before June 1, 1912. 

A communication from Emily F. Chapin to the Mod- 
erator of the meeting, requesting that the Town remove 
so much of the old schoolhouse as stands upon her land, 
was read to the Town. 

ART 12. Voted, 45 to 11, That the Town accept the 
provisions of Chapter 244 of the Acts and Resolves of 
the year 1911. 



16 

ART. 15. Voted, That the Water Commissioners 
are hereby authorized to extend the water pipe from 
Kidder's Corner to opposite the residence of Winslow A. 
Eaton, and from this point to a point opposite the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Albert Washburn, provided that before 
such extensions are made, two bonds are filed guarantee- 
ing 5% on cost of construction in accordance with the 
By-Laws and the sum of $4,267.00 is hereby appropriated 
for the same. 

Voted, That the special Water Works' Sinking Fund 
of the Water Works be liquidated and the proceeds 
turned over to the Town Treasurer to be used in part 
payment of the above, the balance to be taken from the 
Water Works' Treasury. 

ART. 16. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 17. Voted, That if any fire apparatus be 
bought for the East part of the Town, it be bought by 
the Chief of the Fire Department. 

Voted, To appropriate the sum of $200.00 for fire 
apparatus in the East part of the Town. 

ART. 18. Voted, That this whole matter be referred 
to the committee appointed Sept. 8, 1906, viz., E. Irving 
Smith, C. Lee Todd, Richard Briggs, Samuel Farrar and 
Walter W. Johnson to report at the next annual meeting. 

Voted, That the Committee remove all signs from this 
road until such time as the streets are named. 

ART. 19. Voted, To lay a 4-inch water pipe from the 
present terminus near Mrs. Ehlert's house to a point 
near the residence of Vernon A. Wright, and the sum 
of $735.00 is hereby appropriated for the same. 



17 

ART. 20. Voted, To lie on the table. 

Voted to adjourn. 

Attest: 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

March 18, 1912. John F. Farrar was this day sworn 
as Superintendent of Streets by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

John F. Farrar was this day sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, March 27, 1912. Frank E. Hawkes was this 
day sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, March 14, 1912. John A. Rocks was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, March 18, 1912. Matthew H. Doherty was 
this day sworn as Sealer of Weights and Measures by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



18 



Proceedings at the State Primary. 

WARRANT. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhab- 
itants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
the election of State and County Officers, to assemble at 
Bemis Hall, on Tuesday, April 30th, at 7.30 o'clock 
p. m., to give in their votes for the nomination of persons 
for the following offices, viz. : 

Eight delegates at large to the National Convention. 

Eight alternate delegates at large to the National 
Convention. 

Two district delegates to the National Convention. 

Two alternate district delegates to the National Con- 
vention, also to express their preference for President and 
Vice-President of the United States. 

All the above to be voted for on one ballot; the polls' 
to be open at 7.30 p.m., and may be closed at 9.30 p.m. 

All officers are to be voted for at this meeting in accord- 
ance with the direct primaries law passed by the Legis- 
lature in 1912. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 



19 

one of the churches, or in some other public place, seven 
days at least before the day appointed for said meeting, 
and to make seasonable return thereof, with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-third day of April, in 
the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and twelve. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
C. L. TODD, 

Selectmen of Lincoln, 

The return upon the Warrant is as follows: — 

Lincoln, April 23, 1912. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy, one in each of the Post Offices and one in the 
Railroad Station, seven days before the date of said 
meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who 
read the Warrant, and administered the oath to the 
following officers: 

Thomas L. Giles and James W. Lennon, as Ballot 
Clerks; Herbert G. Farrar and J. Malcolm Eveleth as 
Tellers. 

The polls remained open two hours and were closed at 
9.30 o'clock p. m. 

The Ballot Box disclosed the following vote : — 

REPUBLICAN.— Delegates at Large. 

Charles S. Baxter of Medford for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 35 votes 



20 

George W. Coleman of Boston for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 35 votes 

Frederick Fosdick of Fitchburg for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 35 " 

Albert Bushnell Hart of Cambridge for 

Theodore Roosevelt, 35 " 

Octave A. LaRiviere of Springfield for 

Theodore Roosevelt, 35 " 

James P. Magenis of Boston for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 35 " 

Arthur L. Nason of Haverhill for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 35 " 

Alvin G. Weeks of Fall River for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 35 " 

Winthrop Murray Crane of Dalton for 

Wm. H. Taft. 34 " 

John L. Bates of Boston for Wm. H. Taft, 34 " 
Lucius Tuttle of Brookline, for Wm. H. Taft,34 " 
John W. Weeks of Newton for Wm. H. Taft, 34 " 
Samuel B. Capen of Boston for Wm. H. 

Taft, 34 " 

Samuel J. Elder of Winchester for Wm. H. 

Taft, 34 " 

James F. Cavanagh of Everett for Wm. H. 

Taft, 34 " 

Edmond Cate of Fall River for Wm. H. Taft,34 " 
Blank, 9 " 

ALTERNATES AT LARGE.— 

John D. Long of Hingham for Wm. H. Taft, 41 votes 
Benjamin H. Anthony of New Bedford for 

Wm. H. Taft, 41 " 

Frank Vogel of Boston for Wm. H. Taft, 41 " 
Joseph Monette of Lawrence for Wm. H. 

Taft, 41 " 



21 

Charles H. Inness of Boston for Wm. H. 

Taft, 41 votes 

Walter Ballantyne, of Boston for Wm. H. 

Taft. 41 " 

Isaac L. Roberts of Boston for Wm. H. Taft, 41 " 
Ernest G. Adams of Worcester for Wm. H. 

Taft, 41 " 

Blank, 19 " 



ALTERNATES AT LARGE.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 34 

Thomas F. Doherty of Boston for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 33 

Richard A. Flynn of Somerville for Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, 33 
John Larrabee of Melrose for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 33 

John G. Maxfleld of Springfield for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 33 

Max Mitchell of Boston for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 33 

Cassius A. Wood of Boston for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 33 

Russell A. Wood of Cambridge for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 33 

Blank, 19 



DISTRICT DELEGATES.-- Fourth District, Group 1. 
Samuel C. Bennett of Weston for Wm. H 

Taft, 39 votes 

Walter B. Morse of Marlborough for Wm. 

H. Taft, 39 " 



22 

Group 2. 

John M. Keyes of Concord for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 34 votes 

Frederick P. Glazier of Hudson for Theo- 
dore Roosevelt, 33 " 

Blank, 7 " 

ALTERNATE DISTRICT DELEGATES.— Fourth 
District. Group 1. 

Harrie C. -Hunter of Marlborough for 

Theodore Roosevelt, 28 votes 

John E. Coolidge of Waltham for Theodore 

Roosevelt, 29 " 

Group 2. 
Albert P. Messer of Concord for Wm. H 

Taft, 38 votes 

George F. Leslie of Waltham for Wm. H. 

Taft, 38 " 

FOR PREFERENCE FOR PRESIDENT OF THE 
UNITED STATES.— 

Robert M. LaFollette of Wisconsin, 1 vote 

Theodore Roosevelt of New York, 33 votes 

William Howard Taft of Ohio, 38 " 

Blank, 6 " 

FOR PREFERENCE FOR VICE-PRESIDENT.— 
John L. Bates of Boston, 1 vote 

J. W. Sherman, 1 " 

Governor Hadley of Missouri, 1 " 

H. C. Lodge of Massachusetts, 2 votes 

Blank, 20 " 



23 

DEMOCRATIC— Delegates at Large.— 

Frank J. Donahue of Boston for Eugene N. 

Foss, 8 votes 

G. Gerry Brown of Brockton for Eugene N. 

Foss, 4 " 

John W. Coughlin of Fall River for Eugene 

N. Foss, 6 " 

John F. Fitzgerald of Boston for Eugene N. 

Foss, 9 " 

William P. Hayes of Springfield for Eugene 

N. Foss, 5 " 

Charles J. Martell of Boston for Eugene N. 

Foss, 5 " 

Humphrey 0' Sullivan of Lowell for Eugene 

N. Foss, 4 " 

Charles B. Strecker of Brookline for Eugene 

N. Foss, 4 " 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg for Eugene 

N. Foss, 8 " 

Henry F. Bart of Taunton for Woodrow 

Wilson, 3 " 

Henry T. Schaefer of Boston, 4 " 

George Fred Williams of Dedham, 3 " 

John P. Sweeney of Methuen, 3 " 

James H. Vahey of Watertown for Eugene 

N. Foss, 8 " 

John A. Keliher of Boston for Eugene N. 

Foss, 1 vote 

Blank, 4 " 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES AT LARGE.— 

James M. Folan of Norwood, Group 1, 6 votes 

Joseph J. Leonard of Boston, 7 " 

Andrew A. Badaracco of Boston for Eugene 

N. Foss, 5 " 

Charles F. Campbell of Worcester for 

Eugene N. Foss, 9 " 



24 

Peter J. Flaherty of Saugus for Eugene N. 

Foss, 10 votes 

James M. Folan of Norwood, Group 3, for 

Eugene N. Foss, 7 " 

Daniel H. Maguire of Haverhill for Eugene 

N. Foss 11 " 

Luke J. Minnehan of Pittsfield for Eugene 

N. Foss, 7 " 

Daniel M. O'Brien of Rockland for Eugene 

N. Foss, 10 " 

Joseph F. O'Connell of Boston for Eugene 

N. Foss, 8 " 

John P. Kane of Lawrence, 6 " 

Blank, 4 " 



DISTRICT DELEGATES, Fourth District.— 
John J. Desmond of Waltham for Eugene 

N. Foss, 13 votes 

Roger Sherman Hoar of Concord for Eugene 

N. Foss, 12 " 

M. Fred O'Connell of Fitchburg for Eugene 

N. Foss, 2 votes 

John J. Prindiville of Framingham for 

Eugene N. Foss, 1 vote 

Blank, 6 votes 

ALTERNATE DISTRICT DELEGATES, Fourth 

District. — 
Owen A. Hoban of Gardner for Eugene N. 

Foss, 8 votes 

Charles F. McCarthy of Marlborough for 

Eugene N. Foss, 9 " 



25 

FOR PREFERENCE FOR PRESIDENT OF THE 
UNITED STATES.— 

Champ Clark of Missouri, 7 votes 

Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey, 8 " 

Blank, 2 " 

FOR PREFERENCE FOR VICE-PRESIDENT OF 
THE UNITED STATES.— 

John F. Fitzgerald of Boston, 9 votes 

Martin Lomansey of Boston, 1 vote 

James H. Vahey of Watertown, 1 " 

Blank, 6 votes 

All of the above vote was declared in open meeting. 
Voted to adjourn. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, June 24, 1912. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy on the outside of each of the Post Offices and one in 
the Railroad Station seven days before said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was called 
to order by the Town Clerk, who read the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 1. Voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. (The check list being used. ) 

Immediately upon the choice of the Moderator, Mr. 
John F. Farrar addressed the meeting and registered the 
following protest: — 

I hereby protest against any money appropriation at 
this meeting, on the ground that the Warrant has not been 
posted properly. 



26 

Voted, To take up Articles 6 and 7. 

The Committee on Claims made the following report. 

The Committee on Claims who were instructed at the 
Town Meeting of March 4, 1912, to have a survey made 
of the old schoolhouse lot and surroundings have attended 
to that duty and submit the following report: — 

First. That a survey made on the basis of the dis- 
tances and lines of the two deeds in conjunction given by 
" Martha Cole, Executrix," to Pliny Newhall, making 
the northern boundary forty-eight rods and twenty links 
would bring the division line near the center of the present 
building. 

Second. That a survey made as per the deeds of 
Pliny Newhall to Francis Newhall, who deeded in same 
form to James L. Chapin, specifying the northern bound- 
ary in both instances as forty-seven rods, would bring 
the division line in the rear of the present building be- 
tween the house and the outbuildings. The two deeds 
referred to from Martha Cole to Pliny Newhall include 
the missing deed mentioned in the Town report of the 
present year. 

It might also be stated that the deed from Pliny New- 
hall to Francis Newhall and from Francis Newhall to 
James L. Chapin both refer to the deeds of Martha Cole 
for principal metes and bounds. 

The committee herewith present a plan of the school- 
house lot and surroundings drawn by Mr. Horace Tuttle, 
Civil Engineer, in which the solid lines represent the 
boundary in the first section and the dotted lines as that 
in the second section. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH, 
CHARLES S. WHEELER, 

Committee on Claims. 



27 

Voted, To accept the report of the Committee on 
Claims. 

Voted, 43 to 23, That the Committee on Claims be 
instructed to sell the old schoolhouse in the center of the 
Town at public auction before Aug. 15, 1912, the pur- 
chaser to have sixty days in which to remove the building. 

Voted, unanimously, That the Committee on Claims 
be and it is hereby authorized and directed to institute 
all proper proceedings before the Land Court of this 
Commonwealth and elsewhere for the purpose of deter- 
mining and registering the title of the Town in and to the 
lot of land belonging to the Town now occupied in whole 
or in part by the old schoolhouse building (so called ) on 
the westerly side of the Lincoln Common; and that the 
said Committee shall exercise in this behalf all the powers 
and authority to it conferred by the By-Laws of the Town 
and all other powers to it belonging. 

Voted to adjourn. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

May 17, 1912. William H. Sherman was this day sworn 
as Superintendent of Streets vice John F. Farrar,resigned. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



List of Jurors for the year 191 2 as prepared by the 
Selectmen : — 

George. S. Avard, Lincoln, Mass. 

James E. Baker, So. Lincoln, Mass. 

Walter F. Baker, So. Lincoln, Mass. 

Hjalmar Berger, Lincoln, Mass. 

Wallace M. Brooks, Lincoln, Mass. 

J. Elliot Bryant, Waltham, Mass., R. F. D. 

James T. Calkins, So. Lincoln, Mass., R. F. D. 



28 



Clarence G. Clapp, 


Lincoln, Mass. 


Edward R. Farrar, 


So. Lincoln, Mass. 


John F. Farrar, 


So. Lincoln, Mass. 


Thomas L. Giles, 


So. Lincoln, Mass, 


Mason P. Hunter, 


Waltham, Mass., R. F. D. 


Eugene Jose, 


Concord, Mass., R. F. D. 


Roderick B. Laird, 


Lincoln, Mass. 


Charles E. Nelson, 


Lexington, Mass., R. F. D. 


Daniel H. Sherman, 


So. Lincoln, Mass. 


William H. Sherman, 


So. Lincoln, Mass, 


T. Wilbur Smith, 


Lincoln, Mass, 


Howard Snelling, 


So. Lincoln, Mass, 


Martin M. Welch, 


So. Lincoln, Mass 


C. Edgar Wheeler, 


So. Lincoln, Mass., R. F. D, 


Charles S. Wheeler, 


Lincoln, Mass 


Herman T. Wheeler, 


Lexington, Mass., R. F. D, 



CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

This list filed Aug. 2, 1912. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



29 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held July i, 1912. 

WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Monday, 
July 1st, at 8 o'clock p. m., to act on the following Articles 
viz. : 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To see if the Town will extend the water 
pipe from the terminus near Page's Corner to the lot of 
land recently purchased by John H. Stone, and appropri- 
ate money for the purpose, or take any other action with 
reference to the matter. 

ART. 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Water 
Commissioners to dispose of the Deane Steam Pump and 
install in its place a Power Pump, to be driven by elec- 
tricity, and make an appropriation for the same, or take 
any other action with reference to the matter. 



30 

ART. 4. To see if the Town will authorize the Select- 
men to make some contract or arrangement by which the 
Town teams will be located in some permanent place for 
term of years, not exceeding five. 

ART. 5. To see if the Town will build a new hose- 
house and fire-station in the center of the Town on land 
belonging to the Town and appropriate the sum of 
$5,000.00 for the purpose, or take any other action with 
reference to the matter. 

ART. 6. To hear the report of the Committee on 
Claims in regard to the location of the old schoolhouse 
in the center of the Town. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will take any action with 
reference to said report or take any action with reference 
to the old schoolhouse or act anything in regard to the 
matter. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches or some other public place seven days 
at least before the day appointed for such meeting, and 
to make seasonable return thereof with your doings there- 
on, to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-fourth day of June in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and 
twelve. 

C. S. SMITH, 
C. L. TODD, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



31 

The return upon the Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, July 24, 1912. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station, seven days before the date of said meeting. 

GEO. E. CUNNINGHAM, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Town Clerk, who read the Warrant. 
The following votes were then passed: — 

ARTICLE 1. Chose Charles S. Wheeler, Moderator. 
(The Check List was used. ) 

ART. 2. Voted, 62 to 43, That the sale of the school- 
house in the center of the Town be postponed until the 
title to the land under said schoolhouse shall be de- 
termined by the Land Court. 

ART. 3. Voted, That the Committee on Claims be 
authorized to petition the Land Court for registration 
of title to all lands in which the Town has an interest. 

ART. 4 and ART. 5. Not acted upon 

Voted to adjourn. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



The following communication was received at the 
Town Clerk's office Aug. 17, 1912:— 
To the Town of Lincoln: 

The undersigned, being a committee chosen at a 



32 

meeting of the First Parish of Lincoln, held Aug. 16, 1912, 
for the purpose of protecting the rights of the Parish in 
the so-called Common land in the center of Lincoln, 
hereby respectfully communicates to the Town a resolu- 
tion passed at said meeting, a copy of which vote is here- 
with enclosed, and requests the Town to remove from 
land belonging to the Parish, with all reasonable speed, 
within sixty days from the nineteenth day of August 
current, the buildings and structures mentioned in said 
resolution : 

Without waiving or modifying the foregoing request or 
any other request heretofore made this Committee, to- 
gether with George L. Chapin, jointly and severally, 
especially demand that the Town remove within said 
time any such buildings or structures, or parts thereof, 
standing on the land of either or both the said Parish and 
the said Chapin, within the limits of the lot of land de- 
scribed in the deed of Martha Cole to Pliny Newhall, 
dated Feburary 22, 1834, recorded with Middlesex 
South District Deeds, Book 3666, page 110. 

Respectfully, 

NATHAN S. FISKE, 
GEORGE FARRAR, 
EDWARD F. FLINT, 

Committee. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN. / 

Town Clerk. 



Parish Meeting, Aug. 16, 1912. 
Resolved: That, whereas, the Town of Lincoln [did 
on or about July 18th, 1912 petition the Land Court 
for the registration of certain land occupied by a school 
building adjacent to the Common land of the Parish, 
and in its petition claimed title to land owned in past 



33 

by the Parish and in part by the successors of the late 
James L. Chapin; and 

Whereas, on or about March 9th, 1912, the late 
Emily F. Chapin, the then successor of the said James 
L. Chapin, revoked in writing all license or permission 
which the Town had or ever had to occupy or use any 
of her land, and requested the Town to remove the school 
building and other structures so far as they stood thereon; 
and 

Whereas, the said building was located at time of its 
erection in 1870, partly upon land belonging to the Parish 
and 

Whereas, the said Parish Land was granted to 
Benjamin Brown and others, trustees or a committee 
of the society joined together in 1746, for the purpose of 
erecting a meeting house in the Precinct then set off 
from the towns of Concord, Lexington, and Weston, by 
Edward Flint, then of Concord, who gave the said land 
which now comprises a large part of the Lincoln Common 
so called, so that those persons who had joined together 
for the formation of a ministerial precinct and had pre- 
pared a frame for the meeting house ready to be set up 
and had given it to be used for the purposes of this 
society, where they could enjoy "publick worship and 
ordinances of God " conveniently to their dwellings, 
and by reason thereof the said land so given by the deed 
of Edward Flint by the Parish under a sacred trust to 
be devoted to the purposes described in his said deed to 
Benjamin Brown and others; and 

Whereas, the said schoolhouse building after its loca- 
tion on said Parish land, appeared to the committee of 
said Town having charge of the construction thereof, to 
be partly on Parish land and lands of other persons ; and 

Whereas the said building committee then sent to 
this Parish a communication reading as follows: — 
"The Building Committee appointed by the Town to 
carry into effect the vote to erect a schoolhouse, respect- 



34 

fully submit to the First Parish, that in pursuance of the 
duties under instruction of the Town, they located said 
schoolhouse on land occupied by the old Primary School- 
house and adjacent thereto without intention of imposing 
on the rights of any parties. 

Respectfully submitted for the Committee, 

SAMUEL HARTWELL, Clerk, Pro Tern., and; 

Whereas, under Article 5 of a Warrant for a meeting 
of this Parish held September 6th, 1870, "To see what 
action shall be taken by the Parish in regard to land taken 
by the Town for a schoolhouse," it was voted, "that the 
Parish cheerfully acquiesce in the town's building a 
schoolhouse in part on Parish land and in occupying the 
same so long as it may be improved for school purposes," 
and 

Whereas, the said Town has long since ceased to use 
the said building for schoolhouse purposes in accordance 
with the terms of the above vote and has been requested 
by those now owning the land of said Chapin to remove 
such part of the said building as may now stand upon his 
or their land, 

Now therefore, be it 

Resolved and Voted, That all license, permission or 
authority given or supposed to be given by this Parish 
under said vote or otherwise, in and to all land so occu- 
pied by the said Town since 1870, be and the same is 
hereby revoked, and made null and void, and the said 
Town is hereby requested to remove, with all reasonable 
speed, within sixty days from the date hereof, all build- 
ings and structures erected and now continued or main- 
tained in or on said Parish land. And it is further 
Resolved and Voted, That this Parish does now authorize 
any committee appointed for the purpose, to join with 
owners of other lands now occupied as aforesaid by the 
said Town, in any request, demand, suit or proceeding 



35 

at law, or in equity, of, to, or against the said Town, for 
the protection and conservation of the full title and 
rights of this Parish against all parties claiming or pre- 
tending to claim any ownership in said Parish land. And 
be it further Resolved and Voted, That any such com- 
mittee shall have power and authority, and they are 
hereby directed to appear and defend or take other ap- 
propriate proceedings in any suit or controversy which 
involves or may involve the rights of this Parish in and 
to the so called Common land in Lincoln. 

Moved and Voted, That Nathan S. Fiske, George 
Farrar and Edward F. Flint be a committee to carry out 
the foregoing vote, and that a copy of the foregoing reso- 
lutions and votes be sent to the Town. 

On Aug. 19, 1912, a copy of the above communication 
from the Committee of the Parish was sent to the Select- 
men and also to the Committee on Claims, together with 
the following letter : 

Lincoln, Aug. 19, 1912. 
To the Committee on Claims of the Town of Lincoln : 

Gentlemen : — 

I hereby enclose and transmit to you a copy of a letter 
with the accompanying resolutions and votes received by 
me as Town Clerk, August 17, 1912, from a Committee 
of the First Parish of Lincoln and from George L. Chapin. 

Respectfully, 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Lincoln, Sept. 12, 1912. 
Martin M. Welch was this day sworn as Inspector of 
Animals for the year ensuing, by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



36 



Proceedings of the State Election. 

WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSTETS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in the 
election of State and County Officers, to assemble at 
Bemis Hall, on Tuesday, November 5th at seven o'clock 
in the forenoon, to give in their votes for the following 
officers, viz.: Presidential Electors, Governor, Lieuten- 
ant Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor, iVttorney- 
General, Congressman, Councillor, Senator, Repre- 
sentative in the General Court, County Commissioner, 
County Treasurer, and any other officers required by law 
to be chosen in the month of November of the current 
year; also, to vote on the question of the Amendment to 
the Constitution Disqualifying from Voting Persons 
Convicted of Certain Offences. (Chap. 21, Resolves of 
1912.) 

All officers enumerated above are to be designated and 
voted for on one ballot, the polls to be opened at seven 
o'clock a. m., and may be closed at four o'clock, p. m. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices and 
one of the churches, or in some other public place, seven 



37 

days at least before the day appointed for said meeting, 
and to make seasonable return thereof with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this twenty-eighth day of October, 
in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and twelve. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return upon the Warrant is as follows : — 

Lincoln, Sept. 16, 1912. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who read 
the Warrant. 

Thomas L. Giles and James W. Lennon were sworn as 
Ballot Clerks and Herbert G. Farrar and J. Malcolm 
Eveleth as Tellers. 

The polls were open from seven to nine o'clock. The 
total number of votes cast were 37. 

Republican 27. Democratic 10. 

REPUBLICAN PARTY. 

GOVERNOR.— 

Everett C. Benton of Belmont, 16 votes 

Joseph Walker of Brookline, 10 " 
Blank, 1 vote 



38 



LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 




Robert Luce of Somerville, 


26 votes 


Blank, 


1 vote 


SECRETARY.— 




Albert P. Lantry of Springfield, 


25 votes 


Blank, 


2 " 


TREASURER.— 




Elmer A. Stevens of Somerville, 


26 votes 


Blank, 


1 vote 


AUDITOR.— 




John E. White of Tisbury, 


26 votes 


Blank, 


1 vote 


ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 




James M. Swift of Fall River, 


26 votes 


Blank, 


1 vote 


CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District— 




William T. S. Bartlett of Lowell, 


7 votes 


James Wilson Grimes of Reading, 


5 " 


John Jacob Rogers of Lowell, 


13 " 


Blank, 


2 " 


COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 




John J. Hibbs of Lowell, 


1 vote 


George E. Marchand of Lowell, 


7 votes 


G. Frederick Simpson of Newton, 


17 " 


Blank, 


2 " 


SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District- 




Waldo L. Stone of Sudbury, 


26 votes 


Blank, 


1 vote 



39 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
13th Middlesex District. — 



Frederick W. Eaton of Concord, 
Blank, 


23 votes 
4 " 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER. 

Chester B. Williams of Wayland, 
Blank, 


22 votes 
5 " 


COUNTY TREASURER.— 

Joseph 0. Hay den of Somerville, 
Blank, 


24 votes 
3 " 


STATE COMMITTEE.— 

Adelbert B. Messer of Concord, 
Blank, 


24 votes 
3 " 



DELEGATES TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

Henry E. Warner of Lincoln, 19 votes 

George L. Chapin of Lincoln, 2 " 

Charles F. Adams of Lincoln, 1 " 

Blank, 5 " 



TOWN COMMITTEE, 


Lincoln. — 




Charles S. Smith, 




21 votes 


Chester H. Sherman, 




21 " 


John F. Farrar, 




3 " 


Henry E. Warner, 




4 " 


Scattering, 




5 " 


Blank, 




5 " 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY. 



GOVERNOR.— 

Eugene N. Foss of Boston, 
Blank, 



9 votes 
1 vote 



40 



LIEUTEN AN T-GOVERNOR.— 

Edward P. Barry of Boston, 1 vote 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 7 votes 

Blank, 2 " 

SECRETARY.— 

Frank J. Donohue of Boston, 7 votes 

Blank, 3 " 

TREASURER.— 

Joseph L. P. St. Coeur of Cambridge, 7 votes 

Blank, 3 " 

AUDITOR.— 

James F. Carens of Newburyport, 7 votes 

Blank, 3 " 

ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 

George W. Anderson of Boston, 7 votes 

Blank, 3 " 

CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District.— 

James H. Carmichael of Lowell, 1 vote 

Humphrey O' Sullivan of Lowell, 6 votes 

Blank, 3 " 

COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 
John J. Hogan of Lowell, 7 votes 
Blank, 3 " 

SENATOR,. Fifth Middlesex District. 

Charles F. McCarthy of Marlborough, 8 votes 

Blank, 2 " 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 

James William Byron of Concord, 8 votes 

Blank, 2 " 



41 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER. 



John F. Farrar of Lincoln, 


1 vote 


Blank, 


9 votes 


COUNTY TREASURER. 




Thomas F. Royle of Cambridge, 


7 votes 


Blank, 


3 " 


STATE COMMITTEE.— 




Bernard W. Stanley of Watham. 


6 votes 


Blank, 


4 " 


DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.- 




Anthony J. Doherty of Lincoln, 


6 votes 


Blank, 


4 " 


TOWN COMMITTEE.— 




Martin M. Welch, 


7 votes 


Anthony J. Doherty, 


7 " 


C. Lee Todd, 


7 " 


Patrick F. Corrigan, 


5 " 


Thomas Dee, 


5 " 


Thomas L. Giles, 


3 " 


R. D. Donaldson, 


1 vote 


Blank, 


3 votes 


The above vote was declared in open meeting 


. 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows : — 



Lincoln, Oct. 28, 1912. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy, one in each of the Post Offices and one in the Rail- 
road Station, seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 



42 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who 
read the warrant, administered the oath of office to 
Herbert G. Farrar and James W. Lennon as Ballot 
Clerks, and Thomas L. Giles and J. Malcolm Eveleth as 
Tellers. 

The polls were opened at seven o'clock, with the 
counter on the Ballot Box showing 000. The polls were 
closed at 4.30 p. m., with the counter on the Ballot Box 
showing 214. 

The same number of Ballots were counted with the 
following result, which was declared in open meeting. 
After which time, the ballots together with the check list 
were sealed. 

ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESI- 
DENT.— 

Chafin and Wilkins, Prohibition, 1 vote 

At Large, John M. Fisher of Attleborough, 
Edward Kendall of Cambridge. 
By Districts: — ■ 1. Thomas A. Frizzell of Hinsdale. 

2. Oliver W. Cobb of Easthampton. 

3. Henry S. Cowell of Ashburnham. 

4. John Holt of Worcester. 

5. John B. Lewis of Reading. 

6. Willard D. Wylie of Beverly. 

7. Charles E. McColley of Lawrence. 

8. Alfred A. Wright, of Cambridge. 

9. Henry C. Russell, of Maiden. 

10. Aaron L. Woodruff of Boston. 

1 1 . John Morgan of Boston. 

12. Solon W. Bingham, of Boston. 

13. John A. Nicholls of Boston. 

14. Albert J. Orem of Sharon. 

15. David Morrison of Fall River. 

16. Edwin S. Paulding of Plymouth. 



43 

DEBS AND SEIDEL, Socialist, 2 votes 

At Large. — Fred Tepper of Lawrence. 

Daniel A. White of Brockton. 
By Districts:— 1. Wilfred Griffin of Pittsfield. 

2. Charles C. Hitchcock of Ware. 

3. Robert Lawrence of Clinton. 

4. Charles E. Fenner of Worcester. 

5. William J. Carroll of Lowell. 

6. James F. Corey of Haverhill. 

7. Ambrose Miles of Lynn. 

8. John Tiefenthal, Jr. of Cambridge. 

9. John D. Williams of Maiden. 

10. Fred B. Chase of Boston. 

11. George Roewer, Sen. of Boston. 

12. Samuel P. Levenberg of Boston. 

13. Adam Langille of Waltham. 

14. Joel Thebodeau of Brockton. 
15 . John W. Sawyer of Taunton. 
16. Arthur W. Harriman of 

New Bedford. 

ROOSEVELT AND JOHNSON, Progressive, 43 votes 
At Large. — James P. Magenis of Boston. 
Cassius A. Wood of Boston. 
By Districts: — 1. Cornelius C. Cook of Pittsfield. 

2. J. Frank Drake of Springfield. 

3. Frederick Fosdick of Fitchburg. 

4. Frank J. Quist of Worcester. 

5. Lewis D. Apsley of Hudson. 

6. Nelson B. Clark of Beverly. 

7. Lynn M. Ranger of Lynn. 

8. Lawrence G. Brooks of Cambridge. 

9. Eugene H. Cox of Maiden. 

10. Jerome A. Petitti of Boston. 

11. Arthur D. Hill of Boston. 



44 

12. Elihu D. Stone of Boston. 

13. Norman Marshall of Newton. 

14. Charles S. Millet of Brockton. 

15. Robert A. Deon of Fall River. 

16. Frank E. Ramsdell of 

New Bedford. 

TAFT AND SHERMAN, Republican, 89 votes 

At Large. — Rufus D. Adams of Salem. 
David F. Dilton of Palmer. 
By Districts: — 1. William A. Barnes of Pittsfield. 

2. Walter S. Robinson of Springfield. 

3. George R. Wallace of Fitchburg. 

4. James Logan of Worcester. 

5. Harry G. Pollard of Lowell. 

6. Alfred E. Lyons of Haverhill. 

7. C. Neal Barney of Lynn. 

8. Everett C. Benton of Belmont. 

9. Frank M. Sawtell of Maiden. 

10. James W. H. Myrick of Boston. 

1 1 . Frank Vogel of Boston. 

12. Moses S. Lourie of Boston. 

13. J. Henry Gleason of Marlborough. 

14. Horace A. Keith of Brockton. 

15. Alfred B. Williams of Taunton. 

16. Joseph Walsh of Falmouth. 

WILSON AND MARSHALL, Democrat, 73 votes 

At Large. — John W. Cummings of Fall River. 

William A. Gaston of Boston. 
By Districts: — 1. Daniel F. Doherty of Westfleld. 

2. Edward H. Lothrop of Springfield. 

3. Frank H. Pope of Leominster. 

4. John F. Meaney of Blackstone. 

5. J. Joseph O'Connor of Lowell. 

6. Charles A. Russell of Gloucester. 



45 



Blanks, 



7. Walter H. Creamer of Lynn. 

8. Thomas E. Dwyer of Wakefield. 

9. James H. Malone of Chelsea. 

10. John J. Mahoney of Boston.' 

11. Joseph H. O'Neil of Boston. 

12. James T. Powers of Boston. 

13. Charles B. Strecker of Brookline. 

14. Albion C. Drinkwater of Braintree. 

15. Thomas F. Higgins of Fall River. 

16. George M. Harlow of Plymouth. 

6 votes 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Charles S. Bird of Walpole, 
Eugene N. Foss of Boston, 
Frank N. Rand of Haverhill, 
Roland D. Sawyer of Ware, 
Joseph Walker of Brookline, 
Blank, 

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Daniel Cosgrove of Lowell, 
Alfred H. Evans of Northampton, 
Robert Luce of Somerville, 
Robert B. Martin of Boston, 
Dennis McGoff of New Bedford, 
David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 
Blank, 

FOR SECRETARY.— 

Frank J. Donahue of Boston, 
Ellen Hayes of Wellesley, 
Albert P. Lantry of Springfield, 
William W. Nash of Westborough, 
Russell A. Wood of Cambridge, 
Blank, 



42 votes 


60 " 


1 vote 


2 votes 


91 " 


18 " 


30 votes 


1 vote 


98 votes 


2 " 


1 vote 


57 votes 


25 " 


53 votes 


2 " 


99 " 


1 vote 


29 votes 


30 " 



46 



TREASURER.— 

Charles A. Chase of Swansea, 
Eldon B. Keith of Brockton, 
Joseph L. P. St. Coeur of Cambridge, 
Elmer A. Stevens of Somerville, 
Louis F. Weiss of Worcester, 
Blank, 

AUDITOR — 

James F. Carens of Newburyport, 
Herbert B. Griffin of Boston, 
Octave A. LaRiviere of Springfield, 
Sylvester J. McBride of Watertown, 
Jeremiah P. McNally of Salem, 
John E. White of Tisbury, 
Blank, 

ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 

George W. Anderson of Boston, 
Freeman T. Crommett of Chelsea, 
H. Huestis Newton of Everett, 
George E. Roewer, Jr., of Boston, 
James M. Swift of Fall River, 
Blank, 

CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District— 
William J. Carroll of Lowell, 
William N. Osgood of Lowell, 
Humphrey O' Sullivan of Lowell, 
John Jacob Rogers of Lowell, 
M. Storey, 
Blank, 

COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 
Henry G. Burke of Lowell, 
John J. Hogan of Lowell, 
Harrie C. Hunter of Marlborough, 
G. Frederick Simpson of Newton, 
Blank, 



2 votes 


28 " 


52 " 


98 " 


2 " 


32 " 


53 votes 


1 vote 


27 votes 


2 " 


1 vote 


98 votes 


32 " 


56 votes 


1 vote 


27 votes 


3 " 


94 " 


32 " 


2 votes 


22 " 


61 " 


106 " 


1 vote 


22 votes 


3 votes 


54 " 


31 " 


96 " 


30 " 



47 



SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District— 
Frederick P. Glazier of Hudson, 
Charles F. McCarthy of Marlborough, 
Paul L. Metzger of Waltham, 
Waldo L. Stone of Sudbury, 
Blank, 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 
James William Byron of Concord, 
Edward Bailey Caiger of Concord, 
Frederick W. Eaton of Concord, 
Blank, 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER.— 

Winthrop H. Fairbank of Sudbury, 
Robert J. Kelly, of Lowell, 
Chester B. Williams of Wayland, 
Blank, 

COUNTY TREASURER.— 

Nicholas H. Flynn of Somerville, 
Joseph 0. Hayden of Somerville, 
Thomas F. Royle of Cambridge, 
Blank, 

Shall the proposed amendment to the Constitution 
disqualifying from voting persons convicted of certain 
offences be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 84 votes 

No, 23 " 

Blank, 107 " 

Shall the proposed amendment to the Constitution 
relative to the taxation of wild or forest lands be ap- 
proved and ratified? 

Yes, 76 votes 

No, 20 " 

Blank, 118 " 



26 votes 


61 


(C 


2 


a 


105 


a 


20 
JRT, 


(C 


58 votes 


31 


a 


104 


ti 


21 


C( 


76 votes 


2 


u 


104 


(C 


32 


a 


2 votes 


109 


u 


43 


a 


60 


k 



48 



Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and twelve entitled, "An Act relative 
to pensioning laborers in the employ of cities and towns 
be accepted? 

Yes, 43 votes 

No, 57 " 

Blank, 114 " 



Attest : 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



Vote of Middlesex District, Number 13, for Repre- 
sentative in the General Court, as determined and de- 
clared at the Town Clerk's Meeting, held in Concord, 
Nov. 15, 1912. 

Total 
James William 

Byron of 

Concord, 54 341 58 46 130 46 6/5 
Edward Bailey 

Caiger of 

Concord, 
Frederick W. 

Eaton of 

Concord, 115 395 |l04 113 209 262 1,198 
Blank, 24 60 | 21 22 62 26 215 

2,582 

Two certificates of election were filled out for Frederick 
W. Eaton and signed by 

Abbot R. Webber, Town Clerk of Bedford. 
William D. Cross, Asst. Town Clerk of Concord. 
George L. Chapin, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Daniel Brackett, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
George W. Cutting, Town Clerk of Weston. 
Frank F. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 

GEORGE L, CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



Bed. 


Con. 


Lin. 


Sud. 


Way. 


Wes. 


54 


341 


58 


46 


130 


46 


48 


210 


31 


39 


80 


86 


115 

24 


395 
60 


104 
21 


113 
22 


209 
62 


262 
26 

420 


241 


1006 


214 


220 


481 






49 



There have been recorded during the year ending 
Dec. 31, 1912, 22 Births, 12 Marriages, 16 Deaths. 



Births Registered. 



Date of Birth. 


Name of Child. 


June 


29, 


1911. 


James Frederick Naff 


Sept. 


17, 


" 


Edward Corrigan. 


Nov. 


19, 


1895. 


Majorie Beatrice Thomes. 


Feb. 


12, 


1912. 


Mary McAskill. 


Feb. 


27, 




Mary Campobosso. 


Mar. 


15, 




Nellie Grant Christie MacRae. 


April 


3, 




Alma Muir Langille. 


April 


4, 




Doris Arline Butcher. 


April 


5, 




Evelyn Grant. 


April 


9, 




Ramona Whittier Gaffey. 


July 


7, 




Frances Grover Manuel. 


July 


17, 




Carol Hanson. 


July 


22, 




George Albert Cunningham. 


Aug. 


6, 




Foreman. 


Aug. 


30, 




John Joseph Rooney. 


Sept. 


13, 




Annie Diamond. 


Sept. 


17, 




Clifford Milton Bowles. 


Oct. 


14, 




Harriet Tamzin Robus. 


Sept. 


7, 




Min Augusta Hagerty. 


Oct. 


17, 




Margaret Mary Algeo. 


Nov. 


7, 




Elizabeth Dunbar Chapin. 


Dec. 


16, 




Corrine Sharp. 



Names of Parents. 



Frederick J. and Mary (Flood. ) 
Martin and Annie G. (Dempsey.) 
Milton E. and Nellie (O'Neil.) 
Daniel A. and Majorie A. (Morrison). 
Guiseppe and Anna (De Meo.) 
Isaac N. and Nellie G. (Christie.) 
Isaac and Adella (Waugh.) 
Ralph E. and Annie W. (Gilbert.) 
Jack and Signe A. (Blomfeldt. ) 
Leo W. and Marion Abi (Whittier. ) 
Carl H. and Iva Mae (Connell. ) 
Charles L. and Bertha W. (Flint. ) 
Geo. E. and Elizabeth M. (McKinley > 
Charles F. and Annie M. (Limond.) 
John W., Jr., and Mary C. (Shelby. ) 
James and Catherine (Fahey. ) 
William and Delia M. (Davidson.) 
William C. and Tamzin K. (Howes.) 
Raymond E. and Julia C. (Moynihan. ) 
John O. and Mary A. (Dee.) 
Robert B. and Elizabeth H. (Dunbar.) 
Richard and Susan (Manning.) 



50 



Marriages Registered. 



Date of Marriage. 


Names. 


Residence. 


Jan. 17, 1912. 


{ 


James M. Neville. 
Mary A. Malloy. 


Lincoln. 
Lexington. 


April 12, " 


{ 


Thomas Watson. 
Katie Mehan. 


Lincoln. 
Newton. 


April 24, " 


{ 


Thomas Perkins. 
Nellie Dobbyns. 


Lincoln. 
Waltham. 


April 30, " 


{ 


William A. Harding. 
Katherine E. Lahey. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


May 29, " 


{ 


William J. Bennett. 
Ellen Flood. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


June 12, " 


{ 


Warren K. Blodgett 2nd. 
Margaret Lorihg. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


June 29, " 


{ 


Chester H. Sherman. 
Ethel K. Miner. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


July 4, " 


i 


Anders Gustave Anderson. 
Hilma Spohia Johnston. 


East Hartford, Conn. 
Lincoln. 


Sept. 1, " 


{ 


John Kennedy. 
Honor Blanche Cole. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Sept. 30, " 


/ 
\ 


Hazen William Strong. 
Helen Watson. 


South Portland, Me. 
Lincoln. 


Oct. 30, " 


/ 

I 


Edward Francis Flint. 
Josephine M. Ritchie. 


Lincoln. 

Annapolis Royal, U. S. 


Nov. 6, " 


/ 
\ 


John A. Finigan. 

M. Jennie MacHugh. 


Concord. 
Lincoln. 



51 



Deaths Registered. 



Date of Death. 


Name. 


Y. 


Age. 
M. 


D. 


Jan. 5, 1912. 


Susan Flint Shedd. 


86 


11 


5 


Jan. 26, " 


Elizabeth Augusta Madden. 


24 


10 


16 


March 5, " 


Herbert E. Barnes. 


58 


9 


20 


March 8, " 


George Patton Bradley. 


81 


7 


5 


March 28, " 


Mellie Grant Christie MacRae. 


38 


7 


6 


April 25, " 


Emily F. Chapin. 


83 


11 


26 


April 26, " 


George Nelson. 


89 


10 


13 


May 11, " 


Michael Riley. 


82 


8 


12 


May 17, " 


Minnie Preenda Blodgett. 


87 


3 




June 15, " 


Guy H. Wellman. 


42 


4 


28 


June 10, " 


Napoleon Gilbert. 


45 


2 


23 


Aug. 6, " 


Foreman. 


— 


— 


1 


Oct. 19, " 


Deane A. C. Condit. 


26 


— 


— 


Nov. 13, " 


Julia Delory. 


58 


3 


23 


Nov. 13, " 


Margaret Luthera Calhoun Shepard. 


62 


3 


13 


Nov. 20, " 


George F. Harrington. 


84 


5 


— 



52 

EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS, Chap. 29. 

Sect. 3. Physicians and midwives shall on or before 
the fifth day of each month, report to the Clerk of each 
City or Town a correct list of all children born therein 
during the preceding month at whose birth they were 
present, stating the date and place of each birth, the 
name, if any, of the child, its sex and color, and the name, 
place of birth and residence of the parents, the maiden 
name of the mother, and the occupation of the father. 
A physician or midwife who neglects to report such list 
on or before the fifteenth day of the month shall for each 
offence forfeit not more than twenty-five dollars. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the 
birth of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to 
be given to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such 
child is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other 
person who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be 
given notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for 
ten days after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not 
more than five dollars for such offence. 

DOGS LICENSED IN 1912. 

There have been 125 licenses issued as follows: — 103 
Males, 17 Females, 4 Spayed Females, 1 Kennel, for 
which $324.00 has been paid to the County Treasurer. 

The attention of citizens is called to the law which 
states that dogs must be licensed on or before April 1 in 
each year. 

When the first return was made to the County Treas- 
urer on June 10, 1912, only 42 licenses had been issued 
and some licenses were not issued in turn for the return 
to be made as required on Dec. 10, 1912. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



53 



AUDITORS REPORT 

Having examined the accounts of the Town Treasurer, 
Treasurer of the Sinking Trust Fund, in their presence, I 
found their accounts to be correct. I have seen vouchers 
for all money paid and all securities of the Town in their 
charge. I submit herewith an account of the money paid 
by the Treasurer on the Selectmen's orders. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



54 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Selectmen present the following report for the 
fiscal year ending Jan. 31, 1913: — 

The Board was organized at a special meeting by the 
choice of Charles S. Smith, Chairman, and R. D. Donald- 
son, Secretary. 

The following table gives the appropriations made by 
the Town during the year 1912, and the appropriations 
recommended by the board to be made at the next Annual 
Meeting : — 



For Schools, 

Support of Poor, 
Highways and Bridges, 
Library, Dog Tax, and 
Interest, 
Cemeteries, 
Board of Health, 
Tree Warden, 
Miscellaneous Expenses, 
Payment of Water Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, Water, 
Hydrant and other public 
water service, 



Appropriations 
for 1912. 


The Selectmen 

recommend 

the following 

Appropriations 

for the ensuing 

year. 


$10,500 00 


$11,000 00 


500 00 


500 00 


7,500 00 


10,000 00 


400 00 


400 00 


500 00 


500 00 


250 00 


250 00 


200 00 


200 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


4,500 00 


4,500 00 


1,500 00 


2,000 00 


2,173 37 


2,173 37 



2,400 00 2,400 00 



55 



Waltham Hospital, 






Free Bed, 


250 00 


250 00 


Street Lamps, 


1,300 00 


1,300 00 


Fire Department, 


100 00 


100 00 


Payment new School- 






house Bonds, 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


Payment Interest New 






Schoolhouse Bonds, 


1,720 00 


1,600 00 


Suppression Liquor Nui- 






sance, 


200 00 


200 00 



Appointments 

Burial Agent, Joseph Dee. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Special Police, James E. Baker, John W. Rocks, John 
F. Farrar, Joseph DeLory, William A. Harding, F. E. 
Hawkes. 

Forest Fire Wardens, Charles S. Smith, C. Lee Todd, 
R. D. Donaldson, I. N. MacRae, John F. Farrar, James 
E. Baker, Wallace M. Brooks, Charles S. Wheeler. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at Annual State Election, 
James W. Lennon, Malcolm Eveleth, Thomas L. Giles, 
and Herbert G. Farrar. 

Superintendent of Streets, William H. Sherman and 
John F. Farrar. 

Janitor Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 

Forest Warden, J. J. Kelliher. 



56 
Finances 

The Town now has a bonded debt on account of its 
Water Department of $85,000.00, as follows:— 

Issue of 1894, $2,000 00, due one each year. 

Issue of 1897, 10,000 00, 4 % bonds, due 1917. 

Issue of 1900, 23,000 00, 3J% bonds, due 1930. 

Issue of 1902, 9,000 00, 3|% bonds, due 1932. 

Issue of 1903, 5,000 00, 4 % bonds, due 1933. 

Issue of 1904, 5,000 00, 4 % bonds, due 1934. 

Issue of 1906, 14,000 00, 4 % bonds, due 1936. 

Issue of 1907, 4,000 00, 4 % bonds, due 1937. 

Issue of 1911, 5,500 00, 4 % serial 1912 to 1924. 

Fifteen $500.00 bonds, $7,500.00, one each year. 
Total bonded indebtedness, $85,000.00. 

From this total indebtedness should be deducted the 
amount of money now in the Sinking Fund, to retire 
issues of 1897, 1900, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1906, and 1907, at 
maturity. 

There has also been paid from the Town Treasury on 
account of the water works during the past two years 
$5,987.51, which should now be funded, and the cash, 
with accrued interest, paid into the Town Treasury, to 
reimburse the treasury for its expenditure for water 
works extensions. 

The total bond issue on account of the new schoolhouse 
was $55,000, of which $15,000.00 has been retired, 
leaving bonded indebtedness on this account, January 1, 
1913, of $40,000.00. 

It will be necessary for the Town to appropriate 
$3,000.00 to retire bonds this year, also to appropriate 
$1,600.00 on account of interest on the $40,000.00 out- 
standing bonds. 



57 

There is, however, a sinking fund of $3,000.00 provided 
by the appropriation of 1911, which makes the net in- 
debtedness on account of the newschoolhouse $37,000.00. 

The Town Treasurer's report shows that he has in the 
treasury $1,815.60, and that there are uncollected 
taxes amounting to $2,971.17, making total available 
money on this account in the treasury $4,786.77. 

This amount, together with $5,987.51, due the Town 
treasury from the Water Works, and $1,650.00, the 
amount to be received from the County on the comple- 
tion of Lee's Bridge, makes a total available money in 
the treasury, of $12,424.28. 

Support of Poor 

The Auditor's Report shows that $340.65 has been 
paid during the year for the assistance of various people. 

Fire Department 

This department has been conducted during the year 
as heretofore. For a more detailed report, reference is 
made to the report of the Fire Engineer. 

Tree Warden 

The report of the Tree Warden gives a full account of 
the work that has been done, with the results obtained, 
and recommendations for the future. As far as we have 
been able to observe, the department has been conducted 
in a creditable manner. 

Silent Poor Fund 

The Board has not received any application for aid 
from this Fund during the year. The Fund is as re- 
ported by the Treasurer of the Trust Committee. 



58 
Highways 

Mr. John F. Farrar, who had served the Town for 
several years as Superintendent of Streets, was re-ap- 
pointed by the Selectmen at the beginning of the past 
year, but resigned his position early in May, when Mr. 
William H. Sherman was appointed Superintendent, who 
has conducted that department during the last eight 
months. 

For a more detailed report of the work of this depart- 
ment, both as to the expenditure of money and where 
the same has been expended, we refer you to the report 
of the Superintendent of Streets. 

It will be noticed that the Selectmen have recommend- 
ed the appropriation of more money for the two principal 
accounts for which money is appropriated; namely, 
Schools, and Highways and Bridges. The first recom- 
mendation for an increase of appropriation is made at 
the request of the School Committee, who, for various 
reasons, feel that they must, in order to continue the 
high character of the schools, have a small amount of 
additional money. 

In the case of the Highways, during the last two years 
more money has been expended than was appropriated, 
and during the last year considerable more, although 
the net expenditure on account of highways is not as 
large as would appear from the Auditor's Report there 
being a credit in the Town Treasurer's Report of 
$1,285.48, which will make the net amount expended for 
highways $9,536.68 for the year, exclusive of the special 
money expended on the approach to Lee's Bridge. 

It is the ordinary experience of cities and towns that 
their expenditure on account of repairs of highways is 
constantly increased, due primarily to the larger amount 
of traffic going over the roads, as well as the increased 



59 

use of automobiles. Quite a portion of the money ap- 
propriated also has to be expended for material, not only 
for construction, such as crushed stone and gravel, but 
for a dust suppressor, such as oil or taria; also, when the 
season is such as the past season has been, when the 
Town teams and men can be profitably employed during 
most of the winter, the expenditure of money will nec- 
essarily be larger than in a season when snow covers the 
ground for practically the entire winter. It has seemed, 
therefore, taking everything into consideration, best to 
the Selectmen to recommend the appropriation as above, 
namely, $10,000.00, although neither of the men who 
have served as Superintendent of Streets during the 
past year have made any such request or recommenda- 
tion. 



Lee's Bridge 

During the year Lee's Bridge has been practically 
completed, Mr. Adams having executed the contract for 
its completion, with the understanding that the Town 
would pay such proportion of the cost as they would have 
paid had an ordinary commercial bridge been erected. 
This amount, as determined by the Town's Engineer 
and the Engineer of the County Commissioners, was 
$5,500.00, and this amount has already been paid to Mr. 
Adams. The Town will receive from the County, as 
reimbursement on account of this expenditure, $1,650.00, 
in due time. 

The approach to the bridge from the Lincoln side has 
been graded and put in good condition for travel, except 
the railing along the sides of the approach. It has not 
yet been definitely determined whether to use ordinary 
Massachusetts highway railing or pipe. However, per- 
manent construction will be completed early in the 
spring. 



60 

The matter of repairs for Lee's Bridge, which has been 
a matter for constant attention in all previous years will 
now be a thing of the past, as the present structure should 
stand without repairs for an indefinite period. 

The recent correspondence with Mr. Adams and the 
County Commissioners is printed herewith. 

We think the Town should choose a Committee to con- 
fer with Mr. Adams, so that when the bridge is finally 
completed, arrangements can be made for dedication of 
the same, or such other observance as the Committee 
and Mr. Adams shall decide. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



61 

The important correspondence respecting the matter 
as far as Mr. Adams and the County Commissioners is 
concerned, is as follows: — 

South Lincoln, Mass., Dec. 3, 1912. 

My dear Mr. Smith: 

When we last met, you were talking about Lee's 
Bridge and your desire to get the matter settled up in this 
year's Town accounts. I entirely agree with you on that 
point. The sooner the thing is disposed of and so put 
out of the way, the better. 

It occurs to me that there is no reason for further delay. 
It could be settled now as well as at any other time. I 
have been meeting all the payments approved by Mr. 
Codman, the architect of the Bridge, until about three- 
quarters of the entire cost has been paid. The exact 
figures I have at my office, and could give you. 

My suggestion is that, so far as the two Towns are 
concerned, the matter should be closed out at once and 
before the end of the year. They could then pay me 
whatever is to be the contribution of the two Towns 
towards the cost of the structure, and I would then meet 
all further payments. In any event, the contract of 
the company is with me, and I am responsible to it. 

There would seem to be no reason whatever, therefore, 
why the two Towns should not settle for the Bridge, and I 
will then be liable for its completion. 

I shall leave for Washington tomorrow, Wednesday, 
afternoon. I may and not improbably will, be back 
here next Saturday, the 7th. I shall be at my office to- 
morrow, the 4th; if convenient, I could then see you and 
reach an understanding. 

I remain, etc., 

CHARLES F. ADAMS. 
Charles S. Smith, Esq., 
Lincoln, Mass. 



62 

Dec. 31, 1912. 
My dear Mr. Adams : 

I take the first opportunity which has presented itself 
to reply to yours of December 3rd. 

I left for the West on Nov. 29th, and since my return, a 
week ago, have been extremely busy with other matters. 

I have looked up the division of expense, which was 
apportioned by Mr. Worcester and Mr. Kendall, Engi- 
neer for the County Commissioners last year, and I quote 
as follows: 

"On the whole we report that Concord may 

fairly be asked to pay $1,500.00 toward the cost 

of the new structure and Lincoln $5,500.00," 
which is the only matter of particular interest in their 
report as affecting the amounts to be paid to you by the 
two Towns. 

If agreeable to you, we will draw an order at our next 
meeting, so that the Town Treasurer will pay to you 
$5,500.00, and I will take this matter up with the au- 
thorities of the Town of Concord, or allow you to do the 
same direct, which ever you prefer. 

On the completion of the bridge to the satisfaction of 
the County Commissioners I understand that they will 
pay to the Town of Lincoln part of this expense. I have 
not in mind just the amount, but I think somewhere in 
the neighborhood of $1,500.00. 

If the disposition of the matter as above is in accord- 
ance with your views will you kindly let me know? 

Very truly yours, 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

Chairman. 

Hon. Charles Francis Adams, 
84 State Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



63 

1701 Massachusetts Ave., Washington, D. C, 

Jan. 4, 1913. 
My dear Mr. Smith: 

Yours of December 31st has been forwarded to me here. 
I was at Lincoln Monday last, the 30th ultimo, — the 
day before you wrote me — and subsequently at my Bos- 
ton office. I was not then aware that you had got back 
from your trip to the Old Dominion property. 

However, it would have made no difference. I went 
out to Lee's Bridge with Mr. Codman and my son, Harry, 
in the midst of a drenching rain, and with the mud and 
slush fairly in evidence, I made a tolerably careful 
examination. 

Much of the work is quite satisfactory to me. Some 
of it, — especially at the two ends, and where the bridge 
work is connected with the Town work, — is the reverse 
of satisfactory. I think that Mr. Codman's design for 
the connection was unsatisfactory. I so told him, and 
gave directions to have the connecting bits put in per- 
manent shape. This, however, will not be done until 
Spring, as in the Winter is no time in which to use cement. 
It will involve, also, additional cost, of which he is to 
furnish me an estimate. I wish to make a creditable 
and permanent piece of work, and not to turn over to the 
Town, so far as the bridge is concerned, something which 
will stand in need on incessant repairs. 

As you know, in this matter I have not been disposed 
to bargain, much less to haggle, over the amount which 
the Towns will contribute. I regard the bridge as ul- 
timately a permanent memorial to Mrs. Adams and 
myself. As such, it has been my purpose to complete 
it in a form in which it will stand. I, therefore, am quite 
content to leave the matter of adjustment of proportion 
of cost, so far as the Towns and county are concerned, in 
the hands of their representatives. I should be quite 
content with such a settlement as that indicated in your 
letter. 



64 

Meanwhile, on the other hand, I wish the Towns and 
County to understand that whatever settlement is 
effected, the first cost of the bridge, in the course of the 
year now entered upon turned over to the Towns in its 
ultimate form, is something for which I hold myself 
responsible. 

You may, therefore, arrange the settlement, so far as 
the contributary amount to be paid by the Towns is 
concerned, at such time as will suit you convenience and 
the convenience of the Town Treasurer. You can pay 
over to me the amount in question, if you see fit, during 
the current month, so that the matter will be cleaned up, 
so far as the Town records are concerned. I will then 
agree to be responsible for the final payments under the 
contract, and, moreover, for such additional work as 
may be necessary to put the bridge in thoroughly satis- 
factory permanent shape. 

Hoping that the above will meet your views and the 
views of the representatives of Concord and the County, 
I remain, etc., 

(Sd.) CHARLES F. ADAMS. 

Charles S. Smith, Esq., 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
Lincoln, Mass. 



East Cambridge, Jan. 10, 1913. 
Chas. S. Smith, Esq., 

Chairman of Selectmen, 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Dear Sir: — We have your communication of the 6th 
inst., relative to Lee's Bridge and the same shall have our 
consideration. We note that Mr. Adams has already 
arranged for changes at the two ends where the bridge 



65 

work is connected with the Town work and presume so 
far as that is concerned, Mr. Adams will bear any addi- 
tional expense. 

We felt that arrangements with regard to the payment 
of the expense between the Towns and the County had 
been settled, and we have made a record of our under- 
standing to pay the Town of Lincoln $1,650.00, and the 
Town of Concord $850.00. As you suggest, it may be 
well to have the Engineer examine the work. 

Yours very truly, 

LEVI S. GOULD, 

Chairman. 



66 



SCHOOLS 

Payments 

C. S. Lyman, Superintendent of Schools $535 00 

C. S. Lyman, Express Charges, 13 03 
Walter F. Brackett, Teaching. 550 00 
H. J. Bartlett, Teaching, 200 00 
Gertrude E. Brooks, Teaching, 567 00 
Hattie B. Heath, Teaching, 600 00 

D. H. Haviland, Teaching, 495 00 

E. R. Cushing, Teaching, 478 00 
A. L. F. Edwards, Teaching, 248 00 
Carrie B. Chapin, Teaching, 327 65 
A. P. Smith, Teaching, 321 73 
Helena A. Dempsey, Teaching, 6 00 
Jean Allan, Teaching, 245 00 
Marion H. Cook, Teaching, 300 00 
John F. Farrar & Son, Carrying Children, 120 00 
George L. Cousins, Carrying Children, 555 00 
James B. Wheeler, Carrying Children, 585 50 
Thomas J. Dee, Carrying Children, 585 00 
E. Russell Davis, Salary as Janitor, 120 70 
Edward Bannon, Salary as Janitor, 500 00 
National Express, Express, 2 50 
Boston & Maine R. R., School Tickets, 603 25 
Town of Concord, Tuition, 1,149 00 
City of Waltham, Tuition, 487 50 
Matthew H. Doherty, Carrying Children, 120 00 
John D. Fleming, Carrying Pupil, 17 50 
Lorenzo E. Brooks, Carrying Pupil, 17 45 
Walter F. Baker, Carrying Pupil, 17 85 
C. D. Sargent, Carrying Pupil, 17 55 



67 



James T. Laird, Truant Officer, 

H. A. Wood, M.D., Professional Services, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Professional Services, 

Waltham Training School, 

Bertha W. Bent, School Census, 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Services, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 

M. L. Snelling, Coal, 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Coal and Wood, 

John A. Burgess, Repairs on Barge, 

John MacComber, Repairs on Barge, 

Thomas J. McGann, Repairs on Barge, 

M. Steinmann, Repairs onBarge, 

James T. Laird, Sharpening Mower, 

George E. Cunningham, Labor on Schoolgrounds, 

J. W. Griffin, Labor on Barge, 

Thomas Coan, Labor on Schoolgrounds, 

Ed. Press Co., Current Events, 

Crafts' Express Co., Moving Piano, 

Mark Mara, Painting, 

Chandler & Barbar, Supplies, 

E. E. Babb & Co., Supplies, 
Jordan Marsh & Co., Supplies, 
A. R. McLeod, Supplies, 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co., Supplies, 
Houghton, Miffin & Co., Supplies, 
Buttrick Lumber Co., Supplies, 
Little, Brown & Co., Supplies, 
Frost & Adams Co., Supplies, 
Wadworth, Howland Co., Supplies, 
D. C. Heath & Co., Supplies, 

F. B. Alexander, Supplies, 
H. Goldstein, Supplies, 
T. E. Thompson, Supplies, 



$ 10 


00 


200 


00 


2 


00 


9 


00 


10 


00 


4 48 


25 


50 


26 


25 


84 


96 


9 


25 


28 


25 


4 


00 


6 


00 


24 25 


1 


25 


, 51 


00 


19 


35 


2 


00 


8 


00 


7 


00 


4 


75 


11 


40 


168 


86 


13 


50 


3 


91 


8 


61 


11 


43 


56 


31 


18 


67 


2 


02 


1 


38 


10 


77 


8 


77 


16 50 


14 40 



68 



R. D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies, $37 81 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 80 

Lincoln Water Works Water for Lincoln School, 113 61 

C. S. Smith, Coal for Lincoln School, 333 35 



Total, $11,154 60 



HIGHWAYS 
Payments 



John F. Farrar, Superintendent, $169 22 

William H. Sherman, Superintendent and Horse, 945 00 

Martin J. Rooney, Labor, 

John Johnson, Labor, 

John W. Rooney, Labor, 

William H. Ryan, Labor, 

Patrick Craven, Labor, 

Dennis Doherty, Labor, 

James Diamond, Labor, 

Timothy O'hearn, Labor, 

James Craven, Labor, 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor, 

Cunningham Bros., Labor, 

Frank Cunningham, Labor, 

John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 

Michaels Connors, Labor, 

Daniel E. Sherman, Labor, 

Geo. E. Cunningham, Labor, 

Eugene Jose, Labor, 

D. Menilla, Labor, 



70 


00 


93 


00 


431 


00 


513 


50 


390 


70 


459 


50 


16 


00 


671 


00 


323 


00 


37 


25 


51 


50 


173 


00 


204 28 


1 


50 


222 


50 


105 00 


5 


00 


29 00 



69 



John A. Burgess & Son, Labor, 

Daniel MacAskill, Labor, 

John MacComber, Labor, 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Hay and Grain, 

Robert D. Donaldson, 1,880 lbs. Hay, 

D. E. Sherman, Hay, 

Benj. W. Brown, Grain, 

Joseph S. Hart, Straw, 

Matthew H. Doherty, Carriage Hire, 

Charles S. Smith, Posts, 

J. B. Kearney, Inspecting Boiler, 

Boston & Maine R. R. Demurrage, 

M. L. Snelling, Teaming, 

Elsie Pierce, Hay, 

M. L. Snelling, Teaming Coal, 

Welch & Hall Co., One Horse, 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 

W. E. Peterson, Services, 

Wallace E. Brooks, Rent of Crusher Lot, 

Joseph S. Hart, M.D., Rent of Barn, 

H. L. Alderman, Services, 

National Express Co., Express, 

Michael Hopkins, Labor at Lee's Bridge, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, Town Barn, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, Crusher, 

Robert D. Donaldson, Supplies, etc. 

Good Roads Supply Co., Supplies, 

Braman Dow Co., Supplies, 

Standard Oil Co., Supplies, 

Waltham Trap Rock Co., Supplies, 

Buttrick Lumber Co., Supplies, 

B. W. Pike, Supplies, 

Barrett Mfg. Co., Tarvia, Supplies, 

Eagle Oil & Supply So., Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

J. A. Higgins, Supplies, 



$179 53 


46 


25 


76 25 


503 


99 


21 


62 


435 


79 


106 


41 


32 


00 


4 


25 


72 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


7 


50 


29 05 


36 


00 


290 


00 


8 


93 


18 


00 


25 


00 


125 


00 


15 


00 




40 


120 45 


10 


00 


10 


00 


31 


42 


148 


60 


3 


37 


1,181 


27 


1,257 


47 


6 


76 


28 80 


216 


00 


2 


48 


45 


29 


4 


60 



70 



C. N. Carpenter Supply Co., Supplies, 

Lexington Lumber Co., Supplies, 

Daniel H. Sherman, Supplies, 

P. Perry, Supplies, 

J. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 

Waltham Coal Co., Pipe, 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 

Kidder Bros., Supplies, etc., 

L. E. Brooks, Stone, 

Wallace E. Brooks, Stone, 

John D. Fleming, Stone, 

Eugene Jose, Stone, 

C. S. Wheeler, Stone, 

Michael Connors, Stone, 

John Wilson, Stone, 

Frank Cunningham, Stone, 

H. W. Brigham, Stone for Bridge, 

Burt Pearson, Stone, 

J. S. Hart, Gravel, 

Annie Morrissey, Gravel, 

Mary A. Sherman, Gravel, 

Charles D. Sargent, Gravel, 

Elvin Brown, Gravel, 

T. A. Calkins, Gravel, 

Flint Bros., Gravel, 

C. S. Smith, Posts and Gravel, 

C. H. L. Spaulding, Gravel, 



Total, 



$120 


00 


80 


36 


5 


00 


19 


65 


1 


05 


23 


04 


9 


82 


7 


33 


83 


16 


87 


00 


14 


00 


21 


92 


1 


60 


9 


60 


14 


60 


12 


60 


25 


00 


5 


00 


105 


75 


6 


00 


50 


25 


4 


00 


11 


25 


6 


00 


30 


20 


17 


75 


30 


00 


$10,822 


16 



71 
GYPSY MOTH WORK. 



Payments 
James O'Brien, Labor, 
William B. Riley, Labor, 
Henry A. Butcher, Labor, 
Patrick J. Lennon, Labor, 
John Cannair, Labor, 
Thomas Barnes, Labor, 
Byron Lunt, Labor, 
Lewis Gilbert, Labor, 
Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 
George N. Sherman, Labor, 
John J. Kelliher, Supt., Labor, 
I. Langelle, Filing Saws, 
John J. Kelliher, Labor of Horse, 
James T. Laird, Labor of Horse, 
James O'Brien, Labor of Horse, 
Andrew J. Dougherty, Team, 
Frank Cunningham, Team, 
George Cunningham, Team, 
Daniel E. Sherman, Team, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Team, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Team, 
M. H. Doherty, Team, 
James T. Laird, cash paid for Supplies, 
Highway Dept. Storing, Sprayer, 
Harold S. Cousins Co., Supplies, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Repairing, etc., 
A. Dutton, Supplies, 
John A. Burgess, Repairing, 
John MacComber, Repairing, 



$370 


14 


266 


64 


587 


51 


571 


51 


528 


77 


201 


00 


40 


50 


31 


00 


221 


63 


145 


70 


813 


00 


2 


00 


29 


00 


19 


50 


22 


00 


51 


38 


5 


00 


77 


50 


145 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


8 


31 


6 


00 


25 


00 


10 


45 


13 


60 


44 


91 


8 


23 


3 


25 


4 


05 



Total, $4,264 58 



72 
MISCELLANEOUS 

Payments 



Edison Electric Ill'g Co., Light at Hall, 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, E. Bannon, 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, Town Hall, 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, J. T. Laird, 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, J. W. Rooney, 

National Express Co., Express, 

M. H. Doherty, Auto Hire, 

Jos. S. Hart, M.D., Returning Births, 

Kidder Bros., Twenty-one Loads Ashes, 

George E. Crosby, Printing, 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Flag-pole, 

Robert D. Donaldson, Labor on Scales, 

Geo. E. Cunningham, Constable, 

Winslow Eaton, Constable, 

James T. Laird, Constable, 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, 

M. M. Welch, Cattle Inspector, 

M. Storey, Fifty Statements, 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 

M. L. Snelling, Coal, 

Herbert G. Farrar, Election Clerk, 

J. M. Eveleth, Election Clerk, 

Thomas L. Giles, Election Clerk, 

James W. Lennon, Election Clerk, 

James Laird, Constable, Nov. 5., 

Geo. A. A. Pevey, Case of Francis Smith, 

Tuttle's Stable, May 30th, 

C. S. Wheeler, Certification of Notes, 

Fairbanks Scale Co., Labor on Scales, 

Frank Cunningham, Moving Rubbish, 

Horace F. Tuttle, Surveying, 



$44 85 


10 


54 


20 40 


11 


10 


8 


06 


3 


14 


6 


00 


3 


00 


10 50 


392 


55 


15 


00 


5 


10 


82 


50 


25 


00 


53 00 


94 


18 


25 


00 


1 


50 


53 


12 


149 


70 


9 00 


9 00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


5 


00 


200 


00 


8 


40 


6 


00 


4 34 


5 


00 


15 


00 



73 

C. S. Wheeler, Cash paid for Fees in Land Court, $26 00 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 5 50 

C. S. Smith, Printing and Postage, 17 81 

C. S. Smith, Wood, 4 50 

Edward Bannon, Care of Public Building, 499 96 

William Craig, Court Fees, 4 20 

George E. Cunningham, Labor at Hall, 17 00 

Warner, Warner & Stackpole, Services, 30 86 

George L. Chapin, Insurance on Schoolhouse, 30 60 
George L. Chapin, Insurance on old Schoolhouse, 7 20 

W. H. Sherman, Assessor, 50 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Assessor, 51 00 

W. C. Pierce, Assessor, 75 00 

J. Portor Crosby, Service,% Nye Mortgage, 5 00 

Charles Woodhill, Tuning Piano, 7 00 

Highway Dept., Hauling Coal, 60 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Insurance, Hall, 14 40 

Geo. L. Chapin, Clerk, 100 00 

Geo. L. Chapin, Registrar, 15 00 

C. S. Smith, Selectman, 150 00 

C. S. Smith, Overseer, 25 00 

C. S. Smith, Registrar, 10 00 

C. L. Todd, Selectman, 150 00 

C. L. Todd, Overseer, 25 00 

C. L. Todd, Registrar, 10 00 

Robert D. Donaldson, Selectman, 150 00 

Robert D. Donaldson, Overseer, 25 00 

Robert D. Donaldson, Registrar, 10 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer, 315 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Collecting Taxes, 1911 550 20 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 7 04 

A. Pettingell & Co., Supplies, 1 30 

P. B. Murphy, Supplies, 1 95 

Thomas Groom & Co., Supplies, 9 05 

E. & F. King Co., Supplies, 3 92 

Edward Bannon, Sawing Wood, 1 50 



74 

Geo. E. Cunningham, Fighting Fires, $ 6 00 

T. W. Smith, Fighting Fires, 4 40 

John Cannair, Fighting Fires, 2 40 

Thomas J. Dee, Fighting Fires, 3 00 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Fighting Fires, 56 70 

Mr. C. F. Adams (men, ) Fighting Fires, 24 00 

J. E. Baker, Fighting Fires, 9 60 

Burt Pearson, Fighting Fires, 1 20 

Herman Wheeler, Fighting Fires, 80 

C. E. Clark, Fighting Fires, 80 

T. W. Smith, Fighting Fires, 4 00 

J. J. Kelliher, Fighting Fires, 6 00 

J. O'Brien, Fighting Fires, 1 60 

W. C. Robus, Fighting Fires, 4 80 

L. E. Brooks, Fighting Fires, 1 60 

Max Tankle, Fighting Fires, 2 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Fighting Fires, 1 60 

Ralph Butcher Fighting Fires, 4 00 

T. J. Dee, Fighting Fires, 7 00 

Geo. N. Sherman, Fighting Fires, 2 00 

Elmer Bean, Fighting Fires, 9 00 

I. N. McRae, Fighting Fires, 14 90 

J. F. Farrar & Son, Fighting Fires, 6 40 

T. J. Dee, Care of Fire Hose, 15 00 

James B. Wheeler, Care of Fire Hose, 3 20 

William C. Robus, Wiring Voting Booths, 2 75 

L. E. Basley, Labor on Foot Lights, 1 25 
Lincoln Water Works, Cash Paid % F. Smith, 

Road Settlement, 100 00 
Lincoln Water Works, Cash Paid % F- Smith, 

Interest, 7 44 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor on Scales, 2 48 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor on Town Nail, 57 22 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor on Flag Pole, 15 00 

R. D. Donaldson, Labor on Old Schoolhouse 77 34 
R. D. Donaldson, Labor on Wall and Road, Extra, 245 85 



75 

C. S. Smith, Coal for Town Hall, $ 72 27 

American Bonding Co., Bond, 75 00 

J. W. Lennon, Services as Auditor, 125 00 



Total, $4,733 57 



CEMETERY. 



Payments 

J. L. Chapin & Co., Supplies, 

Roger Sherman, Labor, 

D. L. Hamilton, Making Tool Box, 


$26 42 

218 73 

10 00 


Total, 


$255 15 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Payments 

John F. Farrar, Appropriation, $400 00 

John F. Farrar, Dog Tax, 380 05 



STATE AID 



Total, $780 05 



Payment 
John Taisker, One Payment, Total, $4 00 



76 
WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



Payment 
Appropriation, Total, $250 00 



STREET LIGHTS 







Payments 




Jan., 


1912. 


Edison Electric IlPg Co., 


$102 70 


Feb., 


ct 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


101 45 


March, 


li 


Edison Electric IlFg Co., 


100 97 


April, 


ic 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


99 14 


May, 


a 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


96 89 


June, 


a 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


94 17 


July, 


a 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


94 37 


Aug., 


n 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


96 66 


Sept., 


it 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


101 75 


Oct., 


a 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


102 20 


Nov., 


(i 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


105 47 


Dec, 


li 


Edison Electric Ill'g Co., 


109 27 



Total, $1,205 04 



HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE 



Payments 

Lincoln Water Works, 122 Hydrants, $1,830 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, Hall, 50 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Water, Troughs, 444 83 



Total, $2,324 83 



77 
INTEREST 



Payments 

Estabrook & Co., Note No. 3, $198 10 

First National Bank, Note No. 4, 168 63 



BORROWED MONEY 



Total, $3,566 73 



Payments 
First National Bank, Note, $20,000 00 



EAST LINCOLN FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Payments 

H. K. Barnes & Co., 200 feet Hose, 
H. K. Barnes & Co., Supplies, 
Boston & Maine R.R., Freight, 
James T. Laird, Extinguishers, 



$110 00 


4 50 


25 


60 00 



Total, $174 75 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 




Payments 




H. K. Barnes, Supplies, 


$153 00 


James T. Laird, Supplies, 


19 05 


Boston Harness Co., Supplies, 


32 00 


W. Chisholm, Ladders, 


18 25 


Boston & Maine, Freight, 


25 



Total, $222 55 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Payments 




M. M. Welch, Inspecting Meat, 


$144 50 


M. M. Welch, Horse Hire, 


3 00 


M. M. Welch, Cleaning Troughs, 


13 00 


M. M. Welch, Disinfecting Schoolhouse, 


3 75 



Total, $164 25 



SUPPORT OF POOR 



H. E. Barnes, Burial of M. Godonie, 
City of Waltham, Care of Mrs. Ellsworth, 
City of Waltham, Care of Calkin Infant, 
J. S. Hart, M.D., Care of Charles Haynes, 
Boston Infirmary, Care of Charles Haynes, 
W. T. Farrar & Co., Burial of Charles Haynes, 
M. H. Doherty, Trip to Westboro, 
Commonwealth of Mass., Care of Andrew Kilfay 

Total, $340 65 



$18 00 


57 


36 


25 


72 


2 


00 


168 


57 


41 


00 


10 


00 


y, is 


00 



LEE'S BRIDGE 



Payment 
Highway Dept., Labor and Material, $6,200 50 



79 
BONDS AND INTEREST % NEW SCHOOL 



Payments 

First National Bank, Coupons, July 1, 1912, $860 00 

First National Bank, Coupons, Jan. 1, 1913, 860 00 

First National Bank, Bonds, due Jan. 1, 1913, 3,000 00 



Total, 


$4,720 00 


RECAPITULATION 




Payments 




Schools, 


$11,154 60 


Highways, 


10,822 16 


Moths, 


4,264 58 


Water, 


18,164 81 


Miscellaneous, 


4,733 57 


Cemetery, 


255 15 


Lincoln Public Library, 


780 05 


State Aid, 


4 00 


Waltham Hospital, 


250 00 


Street Lights, 


1,205 04 


Hydrants and Other Water Service, 


2,324 83 


Interest, 


366 73 


Borrowed Money, 


20,000 00 


East Lincoln Fire Department, 


174 75 


Fire Department, 


222 55 


Board of Health, 


164 25 


Support of Poor, 


340 65 


Lee's Bridge, 


6,200 50 


Bonds and Interest % New Schoolhouse, 


4,720 00 


Total, 


$86,168 22 



80 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND MEAT 

To Board of Selectmen: — 

I hereby submit following report of animals slaughtered. 
Animals slaughtered during the year 1912: 

Pigs 928 

Calves 148 

Cows . 105 

Bulls 5 

Sheep 1 

Animals slaughtered during January, 1913: 
C. 0. Sargent. 

Jan. 4. Pigs . . 16 

4. Cows ....... 2 

4. Calves 5 

7. Pigs 8 

7. Calves 3 

9. Pigs 10 

9. Cows 3 

11. Pigs 32 

11. Cows 2 

14. Pigs 27 

16. Cows ....... 2 

16. Calves 5 

18. Pigs 10 

18. Claves 1 

21. Pigs 23 

21. Cows . 1 

21. Calves 1 

23. Pigs 13 



81 



Jan. 



Jan. 



Jan. 



25. Pigs . . . 

28, Pigs . ."'.-. 

28. Cows . • . 

28. Calves 

T. C. Cunnert. 

28. Pigs 

28. Calves 

30. Cows 

C. O. Sargent. 

30. Pigs 

30. Cows 

30. Calves 



15 
5 
2 

4 



MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of Board of Health. 



82 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

To Board of Selectmen: — 

I hereby submit the following report from Feb. 1, 1912 
to Feb. 1, 1913: — 



Number of herds of cows 

Number of herds of cows (in milk 

Number of herds of cows (dry 

Number of herds of heifers 

Number of herds of bulls 

Number of herds of sheep 

Number of herds of goats 

Number of herds of pigs 

Cows quarantined and taken for tuberculosis 



90 

691 

129 

146 

32 

24 

1 

744 

7 



MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of Board of Health. 



83 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit the 
fifth annual report ending Jan. 31, 1913. 

Force 

Thirty-six men belong to the Department, one chief, 
five assistant Engineers and thirty call men. There are 
three organized companies. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus belonging to the Department is as 
follows: Three hose carriages, twelve fire extinguishers 
and four ladders and one harness, hose, axes and plaster 
hooks. 

Location of Apparatus 

No. 1. Hose house, old schoolhouse, Lincoln centre. 
No. 2. Kept at F. E. Cousins' grain store,[South Lincoln. 
No. 3. Hose house, John Dee farm, Vigrinia Road, North 
Lincoln. 

Fires 
The past year has been rather an unfortunate one, 
having a total loss of two dwellings and two stables and 
partial loss of two dwellings, at a loss of about $28,000. 
We have had but few brush and chimney fires. 

We would recommend the Town purchase a motor 
truck for the centre of the Town and provide a place to 
keep same. 

ISAAC N. MACRAE, Chief, 
WM. C. ROBUS, 
WM. SHERMAN, 
THOMAS DEE, 
HERBERT FARRAR, 
HAROLD S. COUSINS. 



84 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Selectmen. 

Dear Sirs: — The early Spring of 1912 created a great 
demand for cracked stone on the highways, extra teams 
were hired, and upwards of fifteen hundred tons of stone 
were distributed in the ruts and soft and low places with 
excellent results. The highways are subjected to uses 
entirely different from what they were a few years ago, 
ever since automobiles became numerous. We now 
have to meet the truck problem. Heavy machines, 
weighing when loaded from six to ten tons are continually 
travelling over our roads, one truck in particular is 
making six trips or more every day through a portion of 
our Town. This situation must be met and dealt with 
as well as any other question of advance. 

The old Country road, so-called, which a few years ago 
was almost considered abandoned must be put into con- 
venient condition for travel. This I believe is the short- 
est and most direct line from Weston centre to Lexington 
centre, or from Wellesley to Woburn, and thence on. 
Considerable real estate bordering this road in Lincoln 
has recently changed hands, good buildings will probably 
be built and a demand for a good thoroughfare is sure to 
come. Ugly sharp curves in the lower portion of the 
South Great Road should be and must be'annihilated for 
public convenience. 

The men who have been employed by me on the high- 
ways have had explicit orders, that no matter what they 
were doing to leave everything safe and hasten to the call 
of fire, whether of buildings or forests, this they have 
done, and in several cases with excellent work. 



85 

Early in May last, I tendered to you my resignation 
as Superintendent of Streets, which was accepted. 

The guide-boards at this time were in good order and 
in their proper places. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN F. FARRAR. 



86 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 



To the Board of Selectmen: — 

I hereby submit the following report: — 

I took charge of the streets on May 7th and found them 
in very good condition, there having been a large amount 
of money expended during the months of March and 
April for extra teams and crushed stone. The ruts were 
about all filled on the principal streets. 

I proceeded to finish scraping, to cover what crushed 
stone was left uncovered, clean out the gutters, and to 
smooth up the streets in general. 

I found it necessary to purchase a number of carloads 
of stone to fix up the bad places in the streets where there 
was no gravel to be obtained without teaming a great 
distance. I also used 1,400 loads of gravel on the fol- 
lowing streets: 
Making new gravel road from Farnsworth 

Corner to Wayland line 
C. F. Adams Road . 
Higginson Road 



Sandy Pond Road 
Road near Mr. Story's 
Flint's Road 
Page Road 
Turnpike 
Tower Road 



3,400 feet. 

800 feet. 
1,500 feet. 

800 feet. 

750 feet. 
1,300 feet. 

350 feet. 

775 feet. 

850 feet. 



Also put crushed stone and gravel on the following 
streets : 

On back road near Mr. Wallace Brooks . 250 feet. 
One road from Mr. L. E. Brooks to State Road 1,050 feet. 

On Depot road 750 feet. 

And several short pieces in other parts of the Town. 

There seemed to be a lot of holes in the streets caused 
by automobiles, etc., and I was at loss to know just what 



87 

to fill them with so as to have it remain. I made a 
mixture of fine crushed stone, sand and road oil which I 
proceeded to use at different times to fill them, thus keep- 
ing them fairly smooth. 

Owing to dry weather in the early Summer there was a 
call for oil to lay the dust, and I was obliged to buy four 
carloads which I used where most needed. 

The Depot road started to loosen up in several places, 
and I tried Tarvia as a binder and dust preventative. 
I think it was very satisfactory to all who travel over 
that street. 

The streets were in very good condition until the first 
of January, when the warm weather came and softened 
them. Since then they have been cut up so they are not 
as smooth as I should like to see them at this time of the 
year. The South Great Road is in bad condition and 
needs a great deal of repair. As there is no good gravel 
to be had, the Town will either have to get crushed stone 
from the cars, or set up a crusher in that part of the Town. 

I have been able to keep the regular men and teams at 
work nearly every day up to date by having the work at 
Lee's Bridge, and crushing what stone there was in the 
crusher yard, there being about 600 tons ready for Spring 
use. 

I would recommend that the Town appropriate suffi- 
cient money to keep the Town teams at work all the 
time during the year, weather permitting. Also that 
the Town purchase a stone crusher for the south part, 
using the oil boiler for both crushers. 

Respectfully yours, 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Superintendent of Streets. 
January 31, 1913. 



88 



•2 



OCOOJO 

>ooxt~ 



^ 






a) m c o C 
GO 00 O OQ « 

c 

rs- - J2 

'3* " " "3 
Ph ffl 



o 

S3 
&o 



e 

o 

CO 

g 



ox 

00 



OOOOOOON'ONiMO'i'OCslNWrHiO'H 
■* CO Tf >C b- 00 i-i O Ci O iO CO <M O <N ' _l 
tJ«,-h ,-KN OHNrtCO i-H CO 



5& 



bfi§ 



1-. C3 n 



go 
2 o 

+^J3 



c-i csfn 



3H| 

+3 ■ 

0Qi 






V ! w % Q 

^ c3 Cl O 

"3 -e 2' 



§ . SPh^moq o o o; 

O U! 



■I'd 
c s 

9?fe 



s^i 



m m OiS<I 



o 3 5 c oj "S 






89 



Report of the Commissioners of Sinking and 
Trust Funds. 



1912. 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS. 

In Account with 

TOWN OF LINCOLN. 

Dr. 



Feb. 


1. 


Balance 


$105.96 






Coupons, New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s 


50.00 






Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s . 


80.00 






Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s . 


440.00 


Nov. 


1. 


$500 Town of Lincoln, Serial 4s, due 


500.00 


u 


26. 


Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer 


2,173.37 


Dec. 


24. 


Mary A. Buffum Note, Paid 


1,500.00 


« 




Mary A. Buffum Note, Interest 


185.74 


1913. 








Feb. 


1. 


Interest 


9.22 






Balance 


2,913.37 






Cr. 


$7,957.66 


1912. 




Dec. 


2. 


$3,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 . 


$3,064.58 


a 


24. 


$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 . 


2,048.83 


1913. 








Jan. 


14. 


$3,000 Town of Lincoln 3|s, 1932 . 


2,844.25 




$7,957.66 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
$1,000 New Fngland Tel & Tel. Co. 5s, due 1915. 
$5,500 Town of Lincoln 4s, Serial Bonds due 1912 to 1923. 
$10,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1936. 
$3,000 Town of Lincoln 3|s of 1932. 

Respectfully submitted. 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer 



90 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

FUND FOR EXTRA SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 

1912. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Coupon Town of Lincoln 4s .... $120.00 

1912. Cr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $62.83 

1913. 

F-b. 1. Balance 57.17 



$120.00 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

$3,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1936. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



91 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

SPECIAL WATER WORKS SINKING FUND 

1912. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $231.47 

July 1 . Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s . . . . 80 . 00 



$311.47 
1913. Cr. 
Feb. 1. Balance $311.47 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1917. 

$2311.47 Paid to Town Treasurer according to vote of the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



92 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 



1912. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Dividends, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. 
Dividends, West End St. Ry. pfd. . 
Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 
Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Coupons, Illinois Steel Co. 5s 
Rights, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Interest on deposit. .... 



1913. Cr. 

Jan . 21. Cash, J . F . Farrar , Treasurer Lincoln Library 

1 West End Railway .... 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account 



S83.06 


64.00 


52.00 


64.00 


32.00 


25.00 


2.60 


3.48 


$326.14 


$240.48 


81.25 


4.41 



$326.14 
The Fund is invested as follows: 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co., preferred. 
8 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
1 share West End Street Railway Co., common. 
$500 Illinois Steel Co. 5s, due 1913. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



93 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 
In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 

1912. Dr. 

Feb, 1. Balance 

Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
Dividends, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. . 
Interest on deposit 



1913. Cr. 

Jan. 22. Cash paid J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account . 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co., preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 



$33.02 

35.00 

16.00 

1.08 


$85.10 

$52.08 
33.02 


$85.10 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



94 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account ivith 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT 
OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1912. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $7.25 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 4s . . . 40.00 

Dividends, West End Street Railway, common . 7 . 00 

Interest .81 



$55 06 



1913. Cr. 

Jan. 22. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer, Lincoln Library . $47.81 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account . . 7.25 



$55.06 



The Fund is invested as follows: 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
2 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



95 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account ivith 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN LIBRARY 



1912. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Coupons, Pennsylvania R.R. 
Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 4s 
Dividends, West End St Railway, common 
Interest 



1913. Cr. 

Jan. 22. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer, Lincoln Library 
Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account . 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co., Convertible 3£s, 1915. 
5 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



$19.40 

35.00 

40.00 

17.50 

1.49 


$113.39 


$93.99 
19.40 


$113.39 



96 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 



1912. Dr. 

Jan. 22. Cash, from Chas. S. Wheeler, Treasurer . . $1,000.00 

Aug. 2. $1,000 Kalispell Water & Electric 5s, due . . 1,000.00 

Coupon, Kalispell W T ater & Electric 5s . 25 . 00 

Coupon, Mississippi Valley Gas & Electric 5s 25 . 00 

1913. 

Feb. 1. Interest . ... ... . . . 2.13 



1912. Cr. 

Jan. 23, $1,000 Kalispell Water & Electric 5s . 
Interest, Kalispell Water & Electric 5s 
Aug. 15. $1,000 Mississippi Valley Gas & Electric 5s 
Interest Mississippi Valley Gas & Electric 5s, 
1913. 
Jan. 20. 1 West End Street Railway, common 

22. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer. Lincoln Library 
Feb. 1. Balance, principal account .... 

$2,052.13 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

1 share West End Street Railway, common 
$1,000 Mississippi Valley Gas & Electric Co. 5s, due 1922, 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



$2,052 


.13 


$991 


.25 


1 


.11 


1922, 880 


.00 


1922 14 


.44 


81. 


25 


Y . 36. 


58 


47. 


50 



97 



TRUST FUND COMMISSONERS 

In Account ivith 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT POOR. 

1912. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance ' $182.18 

Coupons, Pennsylvania R. R. 3^s . . . 35.00 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s . . 40.00 

Interest 6.64 



$263 . 82 



1913. Cr. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, income account . . . $218.82 

Balance on deposit, principal account . . 45.00 



$263.82 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Conv., 3^s, due 1915. 
$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s, due 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



98 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN HEARSE 

1912. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $1.22 

Dividend, Pennsylvania R. R. . . . 31. 50 

Interest .63 

$33.35 

1913. Cr. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit $33.35 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

11 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co, 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



99 



C. L. TODD, TREASURER 

In Account with 

THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND. 



1912. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $1,477.61 

Dividends, Pennsylvania Railroad . . . 97 . 50 

Boston & Providence R. R. . . 100.00 

N.Y,N.H.&H.R.R. . . . 40.00 

Fitchburg R. R. pfd 50.00 

Old Colony R.R 70.00 

Boston & Albany .... 87.50 

Boston & Maine R. R. . . . 40.00 

American Tel. & Tel. Co. . . . 480.00 

Boston & Lowell R.R. . . . 240.00 

West End St. Ry. pfd. . '. . 40.00 

Northern Idaho & Mont. Power pfd. 287.50 

Coupons, Maine Central R. R. 4|s . . . 135.00 

Maine Central R. R. 4£-s, due . . 6,000.00 

Rights, American Tel. & Tel. Co. . . . 39.00 

Coupons, New York Railways 4s . . . 40.00 

Utah Co. 6s 90.00 

Interest on deposit 61 . 79 

$9,375.90 



1912. 


Jan. 


30 


Feb. 


8 




22 


March 7 




21 


April 


5 




23 


May 


31 


June 


25 


July 


2 




5 




29 


Aug. 


10 




17 




18 



Cr. 
Boston Ladies' Orchestra, Concert 
Frederick Poole, Lecture 
Dr. Edward A. Steiner, Lecture . 

T. J. Dee, Barge 

Harvard Musical Club, Concert 

Edward H. Frye, Dramatist 

Stephen E. Rogers, Lecture 

$3,000 Utah Co. 6s 

M. H. Doherty, Transportation . 

Wm. Ferguson, stamped envs., etc. (twice 

$245.35 New York Railways 4s . 

$454.70 New York Railways 5s . 

Anchor Linotype Printing Co., Postals, etc 

Teel's Band, Concert .... 

W. C. Robus, Labor and Material 

T. J. Dee, Barge 



$123.00 

100.00 

100.00 

3.00 

57.25 

50.00 

88.50 

3,011.00 

11.00 

10.45 

197.70 

254.00 

8.00 

122.00 

9.38 

3.00 



Oct. 


10. 




11. 




2-4. 


Nov. 


14. 




21. 


Dec. 


7. 




19. 




31. 


1913. 


Jan. 


22. 




23. 


Feb. 


1. 



100 

10 Pennsylvania R. R. . 

S3, 000 Southern Railway 4s . 

Parker's Boston Imperials. Concert 

Henry \Y. Poor, Lecture 

Arthur K. Peck, Lecture 

The Ben Greet Players, Comedy . 

Bliss Perry. Lecture 

Standish Male Quartette, Concert 



5 shares New York, Xew Haven & Hartford R 

White's Musical Review, Concert 

Balance 



R. 



$625.00 

2,380.50 

125.00 

41.84 

50.00 

150.00 

100.00 

37.96 

643 13 
92.50 

981.69 



S9,375.90 



The Fund of S30.000 is invested as foUows: 
40 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 
30 " Boston <fc Lowell R.R. Co. 
10 " Boston & Providence R. R. Co 
10 " Boston & Albany R. R. Co. 
10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co., pfd. 
10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 
10 " West End Street Railway, pfd. 
10 " Xew York. Xew Haven £ Hartford R. R. Co. 
10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co.. common. 
60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
50 " Xorthern Idaho & Montana Power Co., pfd. 
§3,000 Utah Co. 6s, of 1917. 
$4,000 Xew York Railways Co. 5s of 1942. 
$1,000 Xew York Railways Co. 4s of 1942. 
$3,000 Southern Railway Co. 4s of 1956. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C L. TODD, Treasurer. 



101 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH OF THE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

JAN. 31, 1913. 

The occurrence of contagious disease during the past 
year has been as follows : — 

Tuberculosis . 2 cases 

Chicken Pox 4 cases 

Measles 7 cases 

All the cases of measles have occurred during the past 
month (January) and threatened to assume the pro- 
portions of an epidemic. 

The attention of the Town is drawn to the following 
law: — Revised Laws, 75, Sect. 49. "A householder who 
knows that a person in his family or house is sick of 
small pox, diphtheria, scarlet fever or any other in- 
fectious or contagious disease declared by the state board 
of health to be dangerous to the public health shall 
forthwith give notice thereof to the board of health of 
the city or town in which he dwells." The neglect of 
this provision is punishable by a fine of not more than 
one hundred dollars. 

It is to be borne in mind that a mild and harmless case 
of measles in one child may become virulent and fatal 
in the next. 

The prevalence of pediculosis capitis (head lice) 
among the school children became so marked that, at 
the request of the school committee the board of health 
sent a district nurse to the homes of the children reported, 
Subsequently they were treated at the school. 

No complaints have been received by the board on 



102 

account of nuisance alleged to exist. Any complaint 
must be in writing, stating the facts and signed by the 
complainant. 

The board did not appoint any inspector of meats 
during the year. The work ordinarily done by that 
official has been performed by one of the members of 
the board of health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARDS W. HERMAN, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
MARTIN M. WELCH. 

Board of Health. 



103 

ASSESSORS' REPORT. 

The Board of Assessors submit the following report: 

Number of residents assessed on property, 235 

non- residents assessed on property 94 

assessed on polls only, 180 

acres of land assessed, 8,740 

dwelling houses assessed, 252J 

horses assessed, 351 

cows assessed, 755 

neat cattle other than cows assessed, 91 

swine assessed, 345 

sheep assessed, 20 

Value of land, exclusive of buildings, $541,930 00 

" buildings, exclusive of land, 835,635 00 



" real estate, 


$1,377,565 00 


" personal estate, 


2,661,817 00 


Total vaulation, 


$4,039,382 00 


State tax, 


$5,250 00 


County tax, 


2,889 51 


State highway tax, 


103 00 


Town grants, 


43,187 64 



Total, $51,430 15 

Number of polls, 330 

Deduct part of corporation tax, $2,297 57 
Rate $12.00 per $1,000. 

Amount to be collected $49,132 58 

CHARLES S. WHEELER, 
WM. C. PEIRCE, 
WM. H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors. 



104 



Is « 



OO^Or^OOOOO00OI>OOOOO^O 

OCD^O^^OHOOOO^OOO^COOOMN 



HCOOCOHIOCC 
C5 CD CO 
CO <M 

of 



OC<IOC^^iOcO0000'<H00C0*0 
NHN ^^COCOHHO H 



rH tH t— I 



f2 I 



O CO 

co co 

LO CO 



o^o oooooooo o 

O ^H CO Ol O O t}h O O O tF O 

COH OOlCiOICOcOcOOO O 

i-H rH Ol CO CO CO CO Oi 



8 

00 



•.M-8 



w 

p 

r— I 

CO 
H 



o o 
o o 
o^co. 

CO lo 
CO 



o o o 

OJ ^ 



oooooooo 
oo^oooooo 
coot^cqoooo} 



o 
o 



o 
o 
o 



rH rH O 



CO CO CO CO 






O 

o 

CO 



CO 

CO 

OQ 



o o o 

00OC3 



TF CO 



00ON 
^H TJH 00 

00 CO 



ooo^o 

WOO(N(N 

CO tJH 00 CO r* 
rH (M O CO 



to «.g 
<o v ° ri 



o 

CO 



o 
of 

CM 



O O iO 
OiON 

Th Ol 



O O Ol 



io xo o o o 

(NNONO 

i^OOINtO 



Ol TJH 
CO 



<N 






* . e 

CO O ■» 
CD <S> 

co" of m - ~ 

SC d *■* rH 
P B cp cd 
c3 c3 cd ^ ^ 
T3 T3 T5 c3 c3 



CO CD 
CD -+-s 

^£ 

CD CD 



H 



irS I 



pdW 



O CD 
c3 CD 

pqpqpqpqpq 



c3 c3 



CD 

.jo. 

Ha c3 

'In 

CD CD 

PPPQ 



^M 



Q. CD CD O 2 "* 

o o 



bJO co O O 



pqpqpqpqpqpq 



105 



00<MOOOOOOOOOOOCO^(MOO 
<MOOOO<M^HOO<MOO(N<MCOO^OO 



O CO O 00 O O 

OOOOOWH 



eocoocoo5oo»ococ^NooH 

<M t-h CO 



00 O CO io 

CO ^ 



rH t^ 00 

co~ 



o 

iO 



o o o 


p 


o o o o o o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


CO o o 


<M 


CD O O O O O 


o 


o 


T* 


CD 


CO o o 


C5 


t-h 00 CD (N ^H Tt< 


o 


<M 


IO 


iO 


CD 00 


CD 


»O^c0N(Mi0 


CO 


^ 




^ 




t-H 












o o o 


o 


O O O O O O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o o o 


o 


o o o o o o 


o 


o 


tO 


o 


CO *o o 


T-H 


WOiOOOiC 


io 


io 


TH 


00 
















lO LQ 


^ 


t* t* to CD (N ^h 


(M 


CO 




CO 


T-H 















o 



(MOO 
O O O 



O CD CD 
t-h tQ CO 



OOOOOOOOcD^tMOO 



CO ^H CO 

CM 



GO 



CO CO 



O CO O 00 o o 

0050^(^10 



O »0 ^ 

T* t^ 00 
00^ Tji 

co~ 



t-h rJH 



o 


iO o o 


0000000*00*000 


O t-h o o o to 


o 


CO o o 


OiO^OOiOOiONWOiO 


O CD O ^f O t^ 




GO o o 


NCO^iOOCOH CD <M (N 


O CD O t-h CO 












CO CO 


CO O CO 


OON 




T-H 


<M 


(M CO 

CO 



~ ^ CD 

T3 73 "73 
c3 c3 c3 

rH pH pH 

PPpqpq 



CG -tH 

° s 

cd 

p^ 
S.sp 

S-i P-H 

pqpq 



H 



lis 

^Ph^ 

«T c/f J2 
bfl bl-£ 

WPQPQ 



t-J CD 
p-H 


a 


>>«j 


cd 


pH . — i 




C3 C3 


r^n 


§££ 


w m 


BO 


r*MM 


O O 


o 


O O 


o 


Ph Eh 


!h 


pqpqpq 



d^ 5 

• ° 
WOW 



H^^ 



^<i<! 






•-3 r=J 



pH 

P 

OPh 



:P SX) 



.^ 



d pi ~ 

& & «3 

O O >> 

^H ^H P-l 



O^^ ^ 



. ~ 02 
• CD 

HH Th 

^^6 



K ffi 2 

m a! 2 

CD CD -P 

bO b£ a 

pH ?h pH 

P P P 

pqpq pqpq pqpq pqpq 



p « 

S a 
s 2 



II 

S P 

pq S 



[V] ph 

t~H QJ 
pP O 

P P 

pqpq 



pH >i 

CD w 

M§ 

CD CD 
^^ 

o o 

p p 
pqpq 



100 



H 


o^ooo<moooooooog 


r— 


O CD t+i O O O O 




COQOOOO^WOO(X)^OOCDCDtJ<cOOOcDOWO 


* a o 5 


HiO(N0000CDc0O00^r^000000OO^^r- 


00 "tf 00 


Cas 

Pen 
and 

1 Ea 


COt-hOtJH^CO^cOi- 




»0 I>- TJH ^ 


i-h r^ 


1— 1 


T— 1 






t^ 






Total 
on 

Rea 
















05 "3 


o o o c 


o o o 


ooooooooooooo 


6-1 1 


<N (M O C 


o o o 


oooooc^oooocoo^o 


5§S 


HNOOC 


t^ (M O 


^Ttnoqcoi^oo<ioooo^- 


00 <M 00 


£ g 


CO Oi tT 


lO ^H CO 




lONCOCOOr- 


H^C^ 


h rH 


H rt 










CD 






2tH 3 


o o o c 


o o o 


ooooooooooooo 


"S"o5 


o o o c 


iO o o 


ooooooooooooo 




cD^CD lO^O 


N iO »0 


rtl iO O^ C 


t-hOOlQO00*O<MO 


&§- 


<M~ t^Tf 


^co~ef 




tF CD CO CO O i- 


HTjir- 


i-l T^ 












to 






O 


O ^ O 


O (N O C 




OOOOOt-hOOtH 


o 


X -3 
d TO 


CO CO O 


O tF (M o 




^OOt CO^COOO 


oo 




00 <M 


OOOir^ 0C 




CD <N 


i— I O 00 CD CD 


t-H 


d O d 

2 § 

Pn 




TfN rr 




r - 


T— 1 !>- 

i-4 






1 o"^-2 


o o o 


O 00 o c 




oooor^ooo 


o 


M © o if 


lO <M O 


Ohio O 




^OOlOr-HO»Ot^ 


IO 


g g m m 


I> C3 


o^co ^ 


) 


lOOCKNMOiO 


T— 1 




iH 


t*""cO~ t— 


s 


^- 


T— 1 






















<4-( 

o 




























43 














«2 P 




























a 












+3 


b c 




























rs 












CM 


"53 cc 




























"SB 










w 


^ 


f- 


















p^ 








£ 
2 


a a 1 .s 


p 
> 

c 

' p 

h*P 


•p o PI P 

\pJ.pJ.pJ.p 

-,'p/q/q/p" 


c 

p- 

E 

p 


„ cu E- 

^ p 

Oh 


1 

^p 


1 

c 
s p 


HH1I 

IN 

a p 


s 


c 
s 

p 


^H O *^ 

^-P pi 
§ of § 

'Cos 




o3 C3 cd o3 oj 


s- 


s § g 


^T5 C 


Sot 


Sh -4^ P 




cd c3 c3 _C 


^^3^ jZjz 


p£ 


o o c 


o o c 


o o o 




c 


c 


c 


C 


C 


C 


c 


UC 


c 


c 


c 


c 


o 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


c 


o 



107 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOO"* 
(NOCOOOOOOt^O(MOOOC5T-HT^OrH^COT^cOO(MT^Tti 

OHCOHNCO (TC h CO (M C^ CD iO CO t-Ht-h CONlMHrHCO 

00 i—i 



o o 


o o o o 


o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 


CD CD 


O O 00 o 


(M O O O O O ^H O O CD CD -tf CD O O O 


H CO 


00 CO t* l>- 


N^^^HO00(MMC0C500O^00 tH 


00 CO 


TtH CO 


<N 


COMC^iOOOCO 
CO 


H t^ 


CO CD (M 


t-H <M 


o o 


o o o o 


o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 


o o 


O O O »0 


OOOOiOOOOOOOOiOOO o 


00 00 


O O r* <N 


HOO»OMONOOWXNOOifl O 














CD CQ 


Tin CO 


CN 


CO(M(M^rH(M 

CO 


T-H CD 


COiON 


T-H (N 


oc o o o o 


O O 


o o o 


00 O 


O 


O O ^H 


CD O t^ O O 


t^ o 


O Oi t-h 


t-H 00 


l> 


(M tH rH 


O <M iO 00 O 


iO IO 


IOH00 


IO T-H 


TfH 


T"H T* t^ 


1— 1 T-H 


i-l CO 


T-H 




rtH 






OOiC 


o o 


iO o 


O IO iO 


iO o 


IO 


O O O 


QONOO 


r>» io 


»0(MN 


CD iO 


CM 


O O CM 


ooo^ioio 


^ °i 


(M CO CD 


J> t-H 


°1 


t-h C^CD 


















r-H CQ 


i— i 


T-H Oi 

CO 


CO 


T-H 


T-H 



o 
O 

•8 



o 
O 



mm 

CD CD 

P^PhWhIh 



WW 



o 

JH Ih 

o3 c3 



go go co go 

.S.9.S.S 

*G0 "CO *G0 *GO 

d 3 2 2 
O O O O 

oooo 



o ^ 

CD m 

o d 

»-« 

18 



S 02 

o ° 
" * far *" 

B 2 S 

c3 [H C\j 

^ .^ 

^•+^ bJO 

3 CD 9 

£ 3*a 
s fl ^ 

S 3 3 

ooo 



2 CD 

3 bJO 

§ s 
s"s"is 

c3 c3 O 

rd ^^ 

fa£ &c ~ 

£ d *-< 
.15 g CD 

d'd d 

d d d 
d d * 

OOfi 



o 


d 


T2 


HS 




cf 


^-^ 


> 


< 



T3 




F-l 


Jl 


o 


>L 


c3 


o 



Pfl 



CO H^ 
5H ^4- 03 

'53 cd A 

00.2 »" 

cd <5 

Oh O 

CD CD CD CD 

QQQQ 



:w 



- bJD 



GO 

3 9 



.£Ph 



£ s 



c3t5 W 



a d 

c3 |5 



bJD o3 
O O 

QQ 



d 

o 

nd 

d & ±4 

&&£| 

CD CD CD faD 

r& XI ^ d 

OOOO 

QQQQ 



108 



H 1 I 



OOOOOOOTtiOOOOOOOt^OOOOOQOOS 

COCD^CD(NOOOOOCOOO(N^OOOOOOOCOOON 

OOOOiOOCOrtHrtHt^(M T^»Oi0ONNc000W00NH 

i— It— I H(M IOH t-h^t-i 



H TO 

a3 O — 

+3 CO 

o cj 


ooooooooo 

oo^ocdooomo 

iooocooo^^hn 


oooooooooo 

cO(MOOOrhOOOO 

WCOOO(MO(N^OOO 
O00C0^»OCC(MH00 
t— It— 1 t— 1 tH 



d o 


ooooooooo 


oooooooooo 


~S O 03 


oo*oo*ooooo 


oooooooooo 


S? " 


C0000i0^00*0 


COOOiOiO(MOOiOO 


Mj2 






r-H^rHOO (N (M CO 


00iO(MC0^H(NHLO 




T— 1 T— 1 


T— 1 T— 1 1—1 



o o o o o 

O CO 00 CD CO 



CO 



H CO 



GO 



o o o o 



i— I CO 



NO00 
CO 00 O 

CO ^ -hh 
O 



O 00 O 
COOO(N 

00NH 
H N lO 

O 1—1 



0)^ 


o o o o o 


o 


o o o o 


CO O O 


O O H 


03 ° 03 <p 


iO iO *o »o *0 


(M 


»OOOiO 


iO O tH 


lO®^ 


2 S °^ 


(N t-H LQ 


CO 


i— l o o 


iO ^H CO 


lO^O 














m5 o»m 




r-H 


t-H (M 


LO 


HHlO 








<N 


00 o 










t-H 





'3 



3 



a 


M £ 


z 


o^ 




i — i 02 




Cu> O 




|£ 




^ -J 




CD 




S3 




O c3 




PW 



CQ si f-4 
r* 2 * 8 

hS5^ S 

?h CD c3 o3 

rO > o3 03 

HH^Ph 



■4-3 

CD 


p^ 


rO 





0'' 


p£| 


M 


u 

r-3 


*-T 


*h 


03 


cd 


^H 


(Li 


f-H 


^ 


03 


rt 


PhP^ 






PR 



PQ 



^h^p 



c3 



^^H ~ CO 

as*!* 

Ph pan Ph Ph Pr 



(Li 

02 



hD CD 

o i=j 



T3 

T3 Ph 



CD CD 

CD CD 

-+J -4-3 

CO CO 

O 3 



HH CO - ; 

W o3 CD CD CD 

•^p^ o o a 

^ u OOP) 



^| 



o 

2^- 

CD CD CD 



^ >> >^ 



-4-3 -+-» 

.2.2.2 
ESSEEfSooo 



>, O CD ^ ^ _£ 



109 



OOOOOOOOOOOOcMOOCOOOOcOOO^OO 

(N^O(M^OOi<McDOOi<aiWOOHcDkOOOOGOOH(N 

HO^C0005000iiOOO(MNHH^Oi(MOiHOHCOiO 
WOH(NCD05^CDQO <N CO O ' O CO t^ ^cH CM (N 
CM i—l i—l rH rH LQ 



oooooooooo ooo 

(N^OCD^OONOO ^OO 



HOOOQOOilMOdO CM GO t^ 

CM TF WC0 05HC0 05 rH CM 



OOOOOOOOO 

OCD(N^OO^CDOO 



(N05H1O 

t^ ^ CO 
CM 



GO CO tJ< thh 
CO CO CM CM 



oooooooooo ooo 

0*00000 ooo 



ooo»oooooo 
ooo*o*ooooo 
O^GO ^"^^ c^i 00 ^ ^ .. 
coT o" »o~ co~ (N~ c<T cm" 
CM 



o o 


ooo 


o 


CM O O CO 


GO O 


O rH O O 


O CO 


O O CO 


o 


O5IMQ0H 


CO CO 


,^h ^ rH (M 


CO CO 


CO O CO 


o 


^* I> rH CM 


r-i CO 


MNINh 


iO 


CO CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




r— 1 




T— 1 




r-T 




o o 


*o o o 


CO 


o o o o 


iO O 


O O iO O 


o o 


t^ o o 


CO 


rH O LQ GO 


rH O 


O CM r-^ O 


O CO 


>^iO0C 


CO 


CO rH CO 


rH CO 


(MCOHH 








^ fff 






CO 


CM CM 


CO 


iO 




r-i 




rH 




o 





w s 
a s 

d o 
d^ 

ZG 02 
CD CD 

So 



o 



<C^ CD 

o 



•§■3 



oo 



g^gJEaiJ 3 



&H H CD CD T! 



cd" 

o « 

~ o 
02 -^ 
<D rd 

Si § 

ow 



oo 



P ^ CD r£ 

k: h &*-< g 

. § s ^ 

^ 8 « 

fH ^ ^ t>5^ 

w c3 c3 o3 CD 

WWWWWWWW 



§ d 

rd O 

Oh 3 



fe fe £ 

O O cd 



.9 a 



C/T aT M 

CD CD C?3 
bfl bJO d 

OOO 



r £_?<< 



s£ 



CD CD 

d d 

a d 

WW 



d -+3 

d d 
WW 



H 



CO .^ 

■ „ d 

02 O 
CD 02 

d d 
<3 o 



o 



Hd-g CD^rd 

| r/T^ Srd 

d 



CO CD 

-, 2 CD CO^ 

rd d o2 d ^3 

OOOOiu 



110 




M 








ash T 
2rsona 
nd 
Estat 


UCM 


*S i 




« 1 


cs a 


tf 


o 




H 


I 



0000000000000000000^00^ 

C^(NOOOMOO(N^ai^O(NOOCC)(MOO(NCO^lOO^ 



ONOCOiOCD0^003(N»OHN05HCO 

-^C5H (MHHHH(MH(N lOH H/l 



00 Tt< rH 



oooooooooooo 

<NOOOOOOOCNt*cN(MO(M 

NOcD^^CDOr|HOi^O<MiO 

C0O5 H (MHHHHMHIN 



o o 

O <M 


O 


o 
o 


o o 


00 Oi 






CD rJH 

CO rH 



OOOOOOOOOOOO oo 

o o o o o o *o o o o o o oo 

HiC^iOO^OOiNOHOH oo 



CO l> 



CM rH 



HH(NHC^ tH rH 



o 
o 

co" 



o 
o 
o 

CO 



o o 
o o 
o^<n 

CO" r-T 



H -5 

03 m 
Eh H 

— fl — 
So a 

o o 
H £ 



O O 
O <M 



CO t^ 



o 



00 o 



^H 



O O 
00 CO 



O O O tH O O T* 

OOOOCO^iOOO 



y-^ O T-i H 



CO rH O lO 



"mi 


o o 


O 


lO o 


O O 


O O >-0 O IQ O O 


rega 
ue o 
onal 
tate 


iO o 


O 


CD iQ 


lO o 


io io <m cm <m io cq 


<N CO 


i—\ 


CO 


r-i 00 


rH t-1 ,_| rH t^ "# 


MoJ S3W 










rH 


<>Ph 













Pi 

O to 
>-5 O 

^ H 
WW 



HH CD 
CD 03 

_0 _H CQ 

§^ s 

fc£ 03^ 

:<-} C3 03 
Wr-3h^ 



h-sPh 

d d 

o o 

PI Pi 

PI PI 

CD CD 



d 

02 P3 

JH Pi © 

U - o3 

sal 



hS 

p 

03 CD 

as 

CD ^ 

.§ p= 

03 03 



2 :<1 
1 S^ 



PQ 

CD cp 



-r? 

o 

a 



pq c o 



P 
O 

<1PhPh 

CD CD O 



o 

Pi Pi 

cS< 



lis 



>,§oW§ 



r CD ^ 



ef ifi? § 



"£h 'fh " O Th ""Pi 

O O O^ g gffl 



Ill 



O O © 00 O O O O O 00 tH o 
IMMCD(NHCOMOCONH t^ 



OOOCOOOOOOOOOO 

O^OOCOOOOOCO^OOO 



o> b- 


i— 1 


00 ^JH 


t^ tH CM CO CO 


© 


OlMiO^^O^cO 


rh CM 


00 


T-H 


CO i-l 


CO rH 


rH 


CO 


CM 


CM iO CD CM CM CO CO 




CM CO 


*o 






rH 




CO 


CO 


rH r-i i—{ 






T-l 


o 


o 


o o o o o 


o 




© © 


o o o o 




© 


o 


CD 


O CD O O O 


o 




o t4H 


O O O 00 




o 


o 


T— ( 


CM 


0^(N 


o 




o o 


OO^OtH 




rH 


CM 


1—1 


rH 


CO rH 


r-i 


o 




CM CM 


rH CM CO CO 




CM 


"tf 


" 




l—i 




CO 




rH 








o 


o 


O O O O O 


o 




O O 


o o o o 




O 


o 


o 


© io © © © 


© 




o o 


o o o o 




o 


o 


CO 


CD 


»OiOO 


o 




©r^ 


ID O O tH 




o 
























iO 


Oi 


rH 


CM © i- 


iC 




cTth 


HfMiOiO 




CM 


CO 










CM 




i—i 








© o 




00 o 


O 


© 00 rH 


o 


O O CO 


O 00 o o o 


CM CM 




CM rH 


CM 


CONH 


1> 


O 00 CO 


CO ^ CD CD O 


C5 t^ 




00 CM 


i> 




CD CO 


© 


CM IC CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 




CO 






CO 


CM 


CO CO 






CO 


rH 












CO 

cm" 


l—< rH 






rH 


o o 




© iO 


o 


OlOO 


CM 


ONO 


o o o o o 


© o 




©r^ 


o 


lOCOiO 


^ 


OiOCO 


O^iOOO 


rH CO 




r-i rH 


CO 




lO CM 


tH 


ON^O 


CO 


O 






















«tf 




CO 


' 




IO 


Tj< 


rH CO 






i—\ 


r- 1 












© 


i-H rH 






rH 



H 



a a |ph 

PTjHWcTQ g 

O ~ ~ ~ g 

O D CO 03 ^ 

fcjO bC bD bC o3 

CO Cj (^ 0j 

OPhPhPhPh 



;ph 
do £ 






CD 



^^doS 



CD CD 
CD CD 

*CD *0> 

PhPh 



dTO 

O , 

cq CD 
CD 

t-t 

CD 



a 

CD # CD 



• f-H 

*h CD 

•+f> +=> 

CD 02 



DQ 



2 "CD 



M^W 






C3 

:c73 



CD CD 

O CD 

H r-r 

CD CD 






CD 
CD 

fin pL< Ph Ph P£] pin 



I "3 Jg 

cd~ •» „r 
PhWPh 



o 

rH rjH 

- c3 

CD T3 



o 

CD *H 

bfl c3 

CD CD M 

^ cj o 

o o o 
PhPhPh 



O 



o3 


>j 




;d 


rH 






(Si 


CD 


£ 


g 


CD 
• i—i 

< 


^ 


>» 




K 


CD 


rn 


2 


Pi 


CD 


dD 


O 


Ph 


o 


o 


O 


PhPhPh 



112 



OS 



SS22S 000cOGi ^ooooooooooooo 

oo^cooow^ooocoiooo^SHio^oSwo 

^ ^? £ °° ^ ^ ° ^ ^ co w ^ co (Nhioio^ TtH co 

I - H I>" CN T— ( t-H 1— I t-H QQ 



o 

c5 if 


SSSSSS ooooooooo 


ootno 




OOOfMOO OOOO^MCOO^OOOWO 


— o 
5 "3 


(NOOOOiGO^ COOcDOC^iOkOTHO 


CM t-h 00 O 


o <^ 


lOOONHr- 1 to CO CO G5 CO 
CM t-h 


CM t-h to to t^ Ci CO 


©^S 


oooooo ooooooooooooo 


'S'o.g 


OOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOtOOiO 


N3 


oo^o^w^ O lO O to CM 


H CO iO N lO tH i- itO 


S«r3 


r-T ic s co s ^i-T'^ co'cnT cxTc^f 


CNTT-T^r^co cxTcnT 


< & 


N^ 






03 


OOOOOOOOOCi^OOO 


o o 


O O 




OO^OOcOCN^OOOCOtOOO 


to iO 


O t-H 


— 0— i 


OOOCOH HHNO(M QH 


1—1 TjH 


CO CO 


03 ° 2 


CN O CO CO i-i t-h ^H rH 




"tf 


o o 


t— 1 Tf t-H t-H 




t^ 


H 2 
Cm 








03^, 


OOOOOO^tO^HOOiOO 


to to 


o to 


1°?5 


OO^tOtOOtOtOt^l>»tOCMtO 


<N I>- 


O <N 


£§o| 


OlOQH HC5NOH t— It— 1 


t-h CO 


to o 












O t-h CO *0 OirH "^ 




T-H 


<;>Ph w 


t-H T* t—I 




CO 



CD 

O WFH 1-5 

o3 03 fl 

o3 






o3 

m m 02 

CD CD (D j>2 

ftft ft2 

O O O S3 



cd ;g 

*h CD r? " ^ »-j 

03 03O r *«d 

ksH +3 CD CD 

r<i GO -♦i* fa £ 

d 3 ^ 



^h CD CD 
O o3 o3 



CD rd 

d ~. 



OQ 



•P H-2 



•gS I 

5 - ,H ,H - u o 

^d^drd 
mmm 



*>§*" 



PnP$P3tftfP3ri8oQOQa§ 



Eugei 
J. D. 
Mart 
Roge: 


m 


^ *s at *, 




d d d d 


d 


Cg Cg CJ Cu 


c3 


a a s a e 


u t-< m m 


?H 


CD CD CD CD 


CD 


.d^d^^^j 


mmmmm 



ffl 
a 

^ d 

§° 

CD d 

&£ 

mm 



02O 

^ d 

,d >> 
OO 

a | 



113 



OOhiOOOOOOOOOOOO^OOOOOOOOOOO 
O^QOOOOOO^HLOOOOrtHOOO(M^oO(M^(MOO 



CD(NOONOOCOCDMIO>0(N^COH(NMCDHH 
00 "tfi HG5HNO00HG0CD H iO CO CO CO 
rH 00^ CN i-h CO GO ID CD rH 

CO~ rH 



t^ t}H CO TtH 00 

CO 



o o 


o o 


o 


00 o 


o oooooooo 


o o 


o o 


CD O O 


O O O 00 CM O <N O O 


o ^ 


Tt< CD 


CiM^ 


O O CD i—i 


N^CO^CX) 


00 o 


IO rH 


<N 


i-i 00 


^h CO <M 


i-l H CM t^ 


i-l CM 


CM 


1—1 


00 


<N i-i 


T-H 


o o 


O O 


O CD O 


o OOOOOOOO 


o o 


o o 


O O O 


o oooooooo 


LQ O 


»D O 


00 o o 


O ID ID r-i 


O iD i— i O »D 














iO l> 


^H 00 


o 


rH t^ 


O (MO 


O rH C^ CD 


T— 1 1— 1 






LD 


<N r-H 




O i— I *D O O 


O 00 o 




o tp o o o o o 


o 


^h GO O O O 


O ^ oi 




O^OOON^ 


TtH 


<N rjn t^ 00 O 


<M iD >D 




CO^<^(NOrHlO 


O 


^ 


y-i CO 


r>» o id 




CD H H CO 


CD 


CO 




H <M 




CO CD 


CM 


co~ 










- 


O tjh t^ o o 


O O iD 




O O O O O O O 


O 


OCOOOOkC 


OOi(N 




lONOOOOO 


o 


<M t^ *D ID CM 


OWCO 




CM ^H O O O rH tHI 


t^ 














CO 


t-H CO 


CD CD ^h 




tD i— i CD CO 


1— I 


o 




i-i <M 




<N ^D 


CM 


CO 

























CO 

D 

H 


CO 








CD 

9 cu 
cd +!s 












O 

CO 










£oo r 


CO 

D 

H 








, Trust 
., Trus 












2 S £ 

S D c 


g, Caroline.. 
g, Howard . 
g, Marion L 
Lincoln Dai 
ole, Kathari 
ole, Kathari 

Moorfield . 

Moorfield, 
, Richard C 
Elizabeth B 


V 

c 

< 


I, George G. 
., George G. 
I, Martha E 
. John 


c 

c 

< 


-a 

M 


c 

oc 


r, Henry E.. 
1, Samuel J. 


,a\d\s .a .s .9 «-• & & >> ^ >? 


(D ; — i i — ir-i Sh 
-Ti CU CD CD cu . 


^ ^ C m 


a a 

GO DC 


0. 

c 
DC 


0J 
X 




DO 


0^ 

DC 


3 d 


c3 C 

x x 


c 
-4-3 -*i 
cox 


DC 




03 


U rH CO 


' 

c 


> 




i 


o3 



G3 CD 



114 



h a 



'Cm C3_ 

IS 2 



I 10000000000^00 

OOOt^(MO00O(N(NCX)^O 

I iQOOCO^IN^OhHOMH 
I OCO NO^COCCD CO CM CM 

i— I CO H 



c3 a 


1 o o o o 


© © © © 


© © © 


H -2 


© o o ^ 


© © 00 00 


© © © 


— «H 










ce c^ 


OCCi 


(N © IO <N 


© © © 


O c3 


CO OS 


iO 


^h CO iO IO 


CO © 


H « 




T-H 






o^5 


o o o o 


© © © © 


© © © 


o © o o 


OCLQO 


© © iO 


?§H 


lOO^QN 


IO IO © "^ 


iO^©J> 




<M~00 


CM 


po eC-nT^T 


ofio" 


^ 




t-H 






o> 










c; 


iO 


© © 


© © © © ^ 


H -»f 


© 


co cm 


0O CM tJH CM CO ^h © 


Eh H 


iO 


t-h ^ 


TJH © ^ -r-i 


CM CM 


<S O e3 


IO 


CM © 


T-H T-H 


CO i-l 


o § 




CO 






Eh m 










Ch 










-So^c 


l> 


iO © 


©©©©©©© 


M° C "S 


CO 


t^ IO 


© IO © © I> ©- © 


a>.H m "g 


© 


I>- CO 


^00MH 


CM © 












Th 


i—i IO 


T-H 


IO T-H 


<J 




CM 







;* i 



M 



to 

JH 

Jh '53 

o3 _T 

fl O °3 
Pi O 



tf3 a 



71 



fl ti a> 

CO 02 92 
CD CO ^ 



o3 o3 
h3h3 



•^ • ° o3 

UOOh 



X 



a a 



■r- u 

CD CD 

"CD *CD 
CD CD 
hIhI 



h k h h 

CD ^CD CD JD 

"cd 'qj 'a; "cd 

CD CD CD CD 



03 h3 
o3 

n . 

*-■ J2 

"S CD 

CD p^h 



.2§ 

.ShI 

r^ &P 



£££££££££££!£!£ 



115 



art 

-^ rt 

rt a> 



00 



oo*oooaooTtHGOOooooooooooo 

OOOHOOGON^OOOOOOCDHOO^OO^^ 



TjH CO 



H iO CO iOtJ<N h 



00 o o 
GO O O 



(M CO GO 



GOO^GOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

0000(M^0000OOOH00^OO^^ 



<M t^ 



(N 



h^cDCO<MhcD^M(X)00 
iO CO »0 ^ !>• 






w 

p. 

w 
p 

CO 

o 



o o o 
TH o o 

(M iO O 



ooooooooo»ooooooo 

iLOW^iQiooOOMOOOOOO 
(MO O h i-l to O CO i-i t-1 I>~ O O t^ I> 



tH CO 



^(NO 






iO GO 
O i-H 



(M O 

CO 



o 
oc 



4?>£« 



T— i iO 
t^ H 



o 
to 



d - o 
ioffl 

2 «+h CD _r< 

= S ?S 

03 a> is <fi 

£ fl s - 

13 q iu o 

<^pqpq 



ei 




o 




+-> 




73 


-j 


o 


?H 


rn 


3 




^ 


05" 


o 


rn 


^ 




6 
pq 


pq 


?8 




w 


Hs 






^ 


cu 
03 


03 


T3 


O 


kS 


o 


Sh 


u 


WPP 



. s 
. o 

5 a> 

2^ 

t3 m 2 

£ rt -9 

§'*£: 

S3 <» 
O h? «^T 
■O d -o 

<-§,;! 

^ bX3 g 

O £ 

- o o 







§ '•'£§ 



o 



cd t; o s a 

r£ 03 



o ° 3 - 



pqpqpqOOOOO 



o3 A 
.§« 

S el^"2 

03 o o3 

OOfiQ 



§ CD g 

~^S '£ CD 

1° 2 

o3 ^ ^h 

•^ o c 

13 co ^ 
CD O O 

QPP 






116 



5- .2 I 

B © to 

* £T5W 

O a) c_ 

a] <u 

o o w 

H 



OOOOOOCDOOO^OOOOO(MOOOOOO 
O CO (M (M (M O »0 00 CD (M ^ (N O O O ~ 

tOCONHNOOHOO 



CD O O O lO _ 

05 O lO O O N O 

H05H(N^(MHMOi(NoNM 

CD rH W i— I <M 1— I CD 



03 03 

ay 

5 a 


| 

O O O O O CD O O O 
COCS|(MC<lTtHLOOCD(N 

CONr- IN^HT^ t— 1 


OOOOCNOOOOOO 

MOOOOOOOOONCO 

HM^^HCONIMONCO 
t— i (N t— i CD t— i CD 
CD 


Aggregate 

Value of 

Real Estate 


^OOOOOOOOO 
I>OOOOCOOiOO 

CD" l>-~ 

CO 


ooooooooooo 

OOOOCDtQioOOOO 
i— 1 O^O^O^i— I c<i o o O CD CO 

to 



03 i 



CD 



O 
CD 



CO 



O 
00 



Th 






CD 



O 



CD 



V — 


O 


o 


o 


1—1 


»c 


"el O g© 


O 


o 


o 


<M 


l> 


Aggreg 
Value 
Perso 

Esta 


lO 


CO 


^ 


r-1 

<* 

T-H 


co~ 

T-H 





. ."^ 






fH 






■ • O ' 






• o • 






• d • 






• O 


d 

o . 




f-t s> f* 


■4-=> 

bJO 




o ° o 


d^ 




© CO ^ r^Tg 




d >h d - m fe 


QC 


o M o o - § 


Arthur 
E. W., 
R. W., 
. Dora, 
R. R. 
L.&Co 
a J., Co 


bCO o - 5 " FT 


rrj CQ 02 r-H ,D ..h^H 


.^ Sh *H Ojfl^ 


is 2 2 b ■ o S © 


H 


WW^fe 


f^O 



d 

o 

-J-3 

O 



>^H 



d oJ3 
+3 d 

d 03 03 tT -7 

o r ^ o«3 d 
q Ph c3 d ,d 

r aa O H? ^ 

3 CD 03 rd 



73 

• o 

• o 

• d 

• o 

9 ~ o 



d • 

o • 

H x ^ w d : 
pj-'g pkO 

g g S Sh| 

53 ^M 03^ 

S^gSd 
s o g g-e*g 3 § fffr.sps o 



c3 

rd 
d 

rd 

o 
1-5 

08 
o3 

3 

O 



03 

^« 

>>£ 

03 73 

o d 
WW 



117 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOr^oOOOOOGOOOO-^OO 

OWO^OOOOOO^ONOH^OOOOiOOOINOOOOO 



ON 
CO 



Th TjH O rH rH (N 



rH CO CO (M ^h NH 
rH CM 



o o o o o o 

OfNO^OO 

ON IM(N03 
CO Tfri 


OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^OO 

oco^ocNOrHH^ooooooocqooooo 

00 CO <M CM O CO (MOOHOOGONO «tf CM 

O rH t— 1 rH CO (M (N rH Cq rH 
rH rH (M 



o o o o o o 

O O *0 o O iO 
iO CO CM IO N 



<N 



CO 



oooooo^oooooooooooo 

OOOOiOOrHOO^OOOOOONOO 
O^CO CM O^QO »0 (M iO h O^iO Tt^O O^ °^°^ 

oT t-T h ioo* of oo~ c^Tt-T 



o o 


rH 


00 


o o 


o 


»o 


C5 (N 


00 


00 


^H 


r-^ 




o o 


CO 


LO 


»o o 


N 


rH 


N »o 


to 


l> 








CO 


* 1—i 





c 
3.2 

CD ► 

X CD 
©^ 

Sh ^ 

!>H^ 

a .a 

o > 

CD CD 
►H^ 



O 

co 

-d o 
go" 

- Cw 
o 
co 

>> O 

CD O 



5 s 

CO O 

O fl 

mo 

*■£ 

CD c3 

O^ 

P3 






-+-3 C3 

go 



2^ 

r^ O 

CD O 

rO 

B T 

CD« 

^ 'fj 

of o 

o o 
o o 



o 

-1-3 

.9 

*>< 

CD r 



*-< fa 

P^ ri 

~ CO 

. O 



-. CD 
fl O 
CD 



ssssls 



o 

Tin £ 

CD ^ O 

" CD ^3 

r»r, CD 

CD H . 

£ w § 

CD CD O 



O CD co c3 

rh co ^ c3 
• cd . d 

S * S 

o O o 

d 



CD . 
b£ . 

3 PI 

S o 



CO CO 



g rpi C 



08 »r* c3 CD ^ 

CJ 



B 



03 






r; ^ cp rt cd 

0) 0)4-) d [ 

bCbiDO " 



r^ 



5 S S S 
Plh S Ph P4 B Ph Ph OQ S 



o o o 



rd CD 



H co 
^j O 



CD ^ 

5q co 



118 



_^ * "3 

O O ^ 

H 



O 



tN 



CO 
CO 

o 
of 



cOOOcOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO* 

0500HOWONOONOOCOCiO(NOOOON03H 



<N^(N(NH^NH 

10 



h(NiQO^h^^(MhWH 

t-H rH t-H (M TM H 00 



5^ 



O 



(N 



CDOOCOOOOOOOO 
C5OOr-tO(NO<M00<NO 



ooooooooo 

(MO(N00OO(MOO 



T+< T-H tHH (N 



t-h O 
CO 



O ^ 
t-H Ol 



t-H T*H tHH (M t-H CO GO 
T^ rH r> 






o 
o 



ooooooooooo 

0000000000*000 

»OOt— llOr- I O CO t— It— I O 



CO CO 



CO 



03 



o 

CO 



OOOOOOO^OQ 
LOOOOOOOOlO 
00 O t— i tJH O^O^t-h CO ^ 

of oTt-T c©~ 



H W 



CO 
CO 

o 

O 
of 



o 

o 






o o 

00 CO 



LO T-H 



T— I 

CO 



MM 

3? ^ 



o 

CO 

of 

Ol 

Ol 



o 
o 
»o 

co~ 



o o 
o o 



o 

CO 
Ol 



o • 

4h 

0) G 

-4-3 O 

CO -4-3 

rrj co 

£ O 



S~ 



■« o3 

<^> -4-3 
CO 



<ri a> 


<S 


^ W) 


a 


o3 ?h 


nfi 


CSJ O 
e3 ^ 


Q 


HO 


CO 




ad 


^rS 


2 


-4^3 -4-3 




! - ^ 


a a 


pd 


mm 


H 



s s 
J 5 

£ r 
5 ° 

CD O 

+3 -4-3 



. rH 

o 

' d 

"S ° ° 

o gm 

w 'qj r 

^ r d 

§ el S 

-is 

O ^^3 

fl ^ ^ 
fe ^ ^ 

O O £> 

43-P l> 

mmm 



IS 

° s° el 
02. el S 

^ « 

,. P-< o3 

y £^ 

H M « 

£ S ^ 

d a - 

el rH co 
o o CJ 



CD 

O 

I a 

£ o3 

re! r^ 

^ o3 



^ 



c3 el 
e^ o 

•3*8 

^P 

eg 

CD CD 
£h h^3 

^H CO 



H 



e 

r-T rH 

CD CD 



c3 o3 o3 CD 



'T3 

' rM 

• o 

• c 

• e 

• o 

^ o3 



CD 

T3 rC 



d 
-So E 

CO ^ 

CD C4_T CD 

fe °^ 

*^ CO - 



o3 O 



o3 e 



^^^ 



CD 
CO 2 

CD r^H 



« . .gfl 

©Oh ^ - 
<D CD <D .TX .^ 

^ ^ ^ pTJ r^ 



H-3 H^> -1-3 



O +3 
H-3 CO 

bl) O 
.9« 

^w 

„ CO 

«5 

^o 

O r? 

^^ 

o 

ne o 



^£^££££££££ 



119 



WATER COMMISSIONERS REPORT 

The Water Commissioners herewith present their 
Annual Report: — 

Two extensions of pipe have been made in accordance 
with the votes passed at the last annual meeting. First, 
5,517 feet of 4-inch cast iron pipe being layed from the 
corner near C. E. Wheeler's place to the Weston line, 
the work of digging and laying was done in a very satis- 
factory manner by P. Malloy & Son, Waltham. 

The total cost is as follows : — 
Pipe, 

Digging and Laying, at 30c. per foot, 
90 yards Rock at $4.00 
Setting four Hydrants, 
Gates and Hydrants, 
Teaming and Freight, 
Fittings, 
Sundries, 

Total, $3,718 11 

About 1,480 feet of 2-inch galvanized pipe has been 
removed from the Ehlert Road, socalled, and replaced 
with the same amount of 4-inch wood pipe. 

Cost of the same being: — 

Pipe, $422 56 

Teaming, 8 00 

Hydrant and Gates, 46 89 

Digging and Laying, 420 98 

Labor and Superintendent, 12 00 

Fittings, 3 50 

Total, $913 93 



$1,443 


25 


1,655 


10 


360 


00 


10 


00 


146 


24 


68 


02 


17 


50 


18 


00 



120 

The 2-inch galvanized pipe has been used in part to 
make an extension from opposite Dr. Herman's to the 
cottage of Dr. R. L. DeNormandie and a further exten- 
sion near Baker's Bridge. 

There have been eighteen new services connected 
during the year, a large proportion of which were made 
so late in the season that but little revenue appears in 
this year's receipts. 

Ten of these services have been on the old system and 
consequently will materially help in next year's expenses. 

The Commissioners have during the year considered 
the advisability of putting in an Electric Pump in place 
of the Deane Pump, the time having arrived when it will 
require the service of another man in the summer months 
if all the pumping is to be done by steam. 

With an Electric Pump the work can be operated as 
heretofore by one man, with some help for outside work. 

An estimate has been made by Mr. Herbert Nash, Jr., 
Electrical Engineer, and his letter is made a part of this 
report. 

We recommend that the Town authorize the Commis- 
sioners to install an Electric Pump as soon as practicable. 

We are pleased to state that the case of Francis Smith 
vs. The Town of Lincoln, on account of taking additional 
land before the Pumping Station was built, has been 
decided and the Town has now a title to the land. 

It will be seen by the Trial Balance Sheet, that the 
amount of Uncollected Rates is considerably more than 
any of the past few years. Your Committee recommend 
that the Town pass the following vote: — 

Voted, That when Water Rates due July 1 in any year 
remain unpaid on Oct. 1, a notice shall be sent to the 
delinquent and if such rates remain unpaid on Oct. 15, 



121 

the water may be shut off at any time without further 
notice. 

Respectfully, 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 
JOSEPH S. HART, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN. 



Boston, Feb. 1, 1913. 

MR. GEORGE L. CHAPIN, Chairman, 
Board of Water Commissioners, 
Town of Lincoln, Mass. 

Dear Sir: 

In accordance with your request, I have prepared for 
you the following information on the proposition to install 
one or more electric pumps in pumping station of the 
Town of Lincoln. 

I have carefully looked into the merits of various types 
of water pumps operated by electric power and believe 
that the most satisfactory pump would be of the centri- 
fugal type operated on the same shaft as the motor and 
not geared. 

The plunger types are quite complicated and require 
more attention. The general cost of up-keep is greater 
than that of the centrifugal. 

Everything considered the latter type is more efficient 
and economical. It is being used with great success in 
many pumping plants throughout the country. 

During the past year your present station pumped 
80,890,000 gallons of water against a head of 160 feet. 
Considering your local conditions at present I believe 



122 

that you should install one centrifugal pump with a ca- 
pacity of 400 gallons per minute. Under the existing 
power rates of the Edison Company, a pump of this 
capacity would handle your requirements more economi- 
cally than a pump of larger capacity. It would be neces- 
sary to operate the smaller unit for longer periods to 
pump a given amount of water but the electric power 
rates are such that the average unit cost for power would 
be less. 

Electric pumps require no regular attendance other than 
starting and stopping and an occasional cleaning and 
can be operated continually for indefinite periods as the 
demand for water requires. Your engineer could start 
the pump and close the station and utilize his time in 
other work for the Town and return only when he believes 
a sufficient amount of water has been pumped into the 
reservoir. An installation of this type is simple and 
practically fool-proof and really does not require the 
service of an engineer as in the case of a steam pump. 

When the demand for water has increased beyond the 
safe capacity of one pump another similar unit may be 
installed, which probably would be required only during 
the summer months or at times of emergencies. 

At the present time the most highly recommended 
pump is manufactured by the DeLaval Steam Turbine 
Co. of Trenton, N. J., and which is sold by the Power 
Equipment Co. of 131 State Street, Boston. It is con- 
structed of the best material, is extremely rugged and 
has a guaranteed efficiency. (See specifications and 
catalogue). The pump can be easily installed within 
your present plant and at a comparatively slight expense. 

I have prepared the following figures on the cost of 
operating one of these pumps using the present water 
requirements of your Town as a basis for my estimate. I 
also show the actual costs of the steam plant for the last 
year as furnished me by you. 



123 

(1) Cost of pumping by electricity: 
80,890,000 gallons water— 160 foot head. 

72,800 Kilowatt hours per annum. 
(See Rate B. Edison Rate Book) 
Cost of power at 2.34 cents per Kilowatt hour, $1,715.00 
Oil, Waste, etc., 10.00 

Attendance, 120.00 

Interest on investment and depreciation, 150.00 

(10% of $1,500.00. See cost of installation 

below. ) 

Total Cost, $1,995.00 

(2) Cost of pumping by steam: . — 

Engineer's Salary, $1,000.00 

Fuel, 1,365.00 

Oil, Packing, Repairs, etc., (average yearly), 250.00 



$2,615.00 

The above figures show a saving by using electric 
power of $620.00 per year. 

The question of installing an electric pump really comes 
down to the question as to just how much labor the Town 
is willing to charge to the cost of operating the plant. 
I arbitrarily have figured $120 per year or $10 per month 
which in may estimation is ample. 

The Town should consider the fact that the cost of 
fuel per ton has steadily increased while in the other 
hand the Edison Company is gradually reducing their 
rates for electric power. 

In figuring the cost of pumping by steam I did not 
include the interests and depreciation of the present plant. 

If the boiler and steam pumps are properly protected 
while they remain idle the depreciation should not in- 
crease materially. 
Estimated Cost of installing one 400 gallon DeLaval 

Centrifugal Pump: — 
One 400 gallon pump complete with 220 volts, 



$1,185.00 


35.00 


200.00 


30.00 


50.00 



124 

3 phase G. E. Motor and Compensator, 

F. O. B. Lincoln, 
Cost of cartage from station to plant, 
Piping, Valves, etc., 
Setting Pump. 
Electric Wiring Complete, 

Total, $1,500.00 

The installation of this pump is quite simple and can 
be done under the direction of your present engineer. 
The Power Equipment Company will furnish a man free 
of cost to give advice and inspect the installation. 

The Edison Illuminating Co. will run all necessary 
wires to the building free of cost and will also furnish a 
main switch with fuses. 

I enclose with this letter the specification and proposal 
contract for the pump and motor, a catalogue giving 
general data on DeLaval Centrifugal Pump, and the 
schedule of power rates offered by the Edison Co. 

I trust that the above covers what you wish and I will 
be very glad to furnish you with any additional informa- 
tion you may desire. 

Yours very truly, 

HERBERT NASH, Jr. 



125 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING FEBRUARY i, 1913. 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 

General Statistics 

Population by census of 1910, 1,175. 
Date of construction, 1874. 
By whom owned, Town. 
Source of supply, Sandy Pond. 
Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon, Cross compound Fly Wheel 
Pump, 12" and 20i" x 5f " x 12". 

Deane Compound Condensing Duplex Pump 7§" and 
16" x 9f " x 18". 
Description of fuel used. 
Kind, hard and soft coal. 
Brand of coal, Lackawanna, New River. 
Average price of hard coal per gross ton, delivered, $7.35. 
Average price of soft coal, per gross ton, delivered, 
Percentage of ash 22%. 
Wood, price per cord, $5.50. 
Coal consumed for the year in pumping, 
Pounds of wood consumed, equivalent amount of coal, 
Total equivalent coal consumed for the year 368,308 lbs. 
Total pumpage for the year, 80,893,800 gallons. 
Average static head against which pumps work 148.5 ft. 
iWerage dynamic head against which pumps work 160 ft. 



126 

Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent coal, 

219. 
Duty. 
Cost of Pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

viz., $3,033.65. 
Per million gallons pumped, $37.50. 
Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic ), 23.4 cents. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water 

Estimated total population at date, 1,175. 
Estimated population on lines of pipe, 1,145. 
Estimated population supplied, 1,145. 
Total water pumped for the year, 80,893,800 gallons. 
Passed through meters, 28,968,365 gallons. 
Percentage of consumption metered 35.7. 
Average daily consumption, 221,624 gallons. 
*Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 135. + 
*Gallons per day to each consumer, 146. + 
^Gallons per day to each tap, 545. + 

*The metered water sold to R. R. Co. is deducted from 
the total consumption in making these averages. 



127 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System 



Mains. 

1. Kind of pipe, cast iron 

and cement lined. 

2. Sizes, from 4" to 12". 

3. Extended 5,517 ft. 

during year. 

4. Discontinued 00 ft. 

during year. 

5. Total now in use, 

26,411 miles. 

6. Cost of repairs per 

mile, 

7. Number of leaks per 

mile, 

8. Length of pipes less 

than 4 inches diam., 
900 feet, 

9. Number of hydrants 

added during year, 8. 

10. Number of hydrants 

(public and private) 
now in use, 122. 

11. Number of stop gates 

added during year, 
6. 

12. Number of stop gates 

now in use, 133. 

13. Number of stop gates 

smaller than 4 inch, 
4. 

14. Number of blow-offs, 

29. 

15. Range of pressure on 

mains 40 lbs. to 102 
lbs. 



Services. 

16. Kind of pipe, galv. 

iron and cement 
lined. 

17. Sizes,!" to 4". 

18. Extended 175 ft. 

19. Discontinued 00 feet. 

20. Total now in use, 

miles. 

21. Number of service 

taps added during 
year, 18. 

22. Number now in use, 

308. 

23. Average length of 

service, 12 feet. 

24. Average cost of serv- 

ice for the year, 
$9.50. 

25. Number of meters 

added, 6. 

26. Number now in use, 

43. 



128 



WATER. 

Payments. 
J. T. Laird, Services as Superintendent and 

Engineer, $1,000 50 

J. T. Laird, Labor of Horse, 
Cunningham Bros., Labor, Water Extensions, 
F. H. Cunningham, Labor, Water Extensions, 
F. H. Cunningham, Labor, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 
P. J. Whelan, Labor, 
W. J. Maguire, Labor and Repairs, 
Boston S. P. R. & Supply Co., Labor and 

Repairs, 
M. F. Dougherty, Labor, Reading Meters, 
Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor, 
L. E. Bazley, Labor, 
N. Catona, Labor, 
H. F. Tuttle, Labor, 

P. Maloy & Son, Labor, on Water Extension, 2 
Robert D. Donaldson, Labor and Supplies, 
I. Langelle, Labor, 
J. Moynihan, Labor, 
M. Sherman, Labor, 
Scott Cofran, Labor, 
I. N. McRae, Labor to Dec. 23, 1912, 
Edison Electric Ill'g Co., Service of Light, 
National Express Co., Express, 
Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 
Matthew H. Doherty, Carriage and Hire, 
M. L. Snelling, Teaming Coal, 
Geo. E. Crosby & Co., Printing, 



140 


18 


244 


88 


425 


98 


322 


59 


168 


91 


6 


15 


112 


16 


48 


15 


20 


00 


44 


50 


2 


33 


1 


00 


23 


15 


399 


60 


24 


65 


2 


00 


1 


00 


3 


75 


5 


25 


126 


68 


10 


60 


14 


02 


183 


52 


10 


18 


87 


24 


22 


95 



129 

Miss Patrick, Printing, 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 

Thomas Groom & Co., Printing, 

Waltham Coal Co., one barrel Fire Clay, 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 

M. L. Snelling, Coal, 

M. Sherman, Wood, 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Labor and Supplies : 

M. J. Drummond & Co., Water Pipe, 

Eastern Mfg. Co., Wood Pipe, 

First National Bank, Coupons, 

Geo. A. A. Pevey, Professional Services, 

E. I. Smith, Professional Services, Smith case, 

C. S. Wheeler, Expenses, Smith Case, 

J. J. O'Brien, Expenses, Smith Case, 

J. Rose & Co., Expenses, Smith Case, 

State Treasurer, Coupons, Registered Bonds, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Telegram, 

Highway Department, Dust and Teaming, 

W. C. Pierce, Rent of Land, 

A. P. Peterson, Plants, 

Estate of Francis Smith, Verdict, Land and 

Costs, 
C. S. Wheeler, Treas., Coupons, Due Nov. 1, 

1912, 
C. L. Todd, Treas., Sinking Fund, 
S. W. Tucker, Professional Services, 
C. S. Wheeler, Payment $1,000 Bond, Due 

Dec. 1st, 
C. S. Wheeler, Coupons, Due Dec. 1st, 
J. S. Hart, M.D., W^ater Commissioner, 
W. H. Sherman, Water Commissioner, 
Geo. L. Chapin, Water Commissioner, 
Geo. L. Chapin, Water Collector, 
National Meter Co., Supplies, 
Garlock Mfg. Co., Supplies, 



$2 75 


4 00 


1 


75 


2 


50 


992 


55 


226 


67 


25 


00 


j, 24 


25 


1,294 


41 


422 


56 


2,487 


50 


400 


00 


25 


00 


13 


61 


9 


50 


6 


00 


40 


00 




94 


7 


50 


5 


00 


10 


50 


594 44 


87 


50 


2,173 


37 


5 


00 


1,000 


00 


622 


50 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


150 


00 


6 


35 


2 


11 



130 



H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

Burdett & Co., Supplies, 

Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 

Chadwick Boston Lead Co., Supplies, 

Chapman Valve Co., Supplies, 

Builders' Iron Foundry, Supplies, 

John A. Burgess, Supplies, 

Union Water Meter Co., Supplies, 

Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

Davis Farnum Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

Wilson Lumber Co., Supplies, 

S. H. Davis Co., Supplies, 

Buttrick Lumber Co., Supplies, 

J. S. Hart, M.D., Supplies, 

J. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 

C. S. Wheeler, Coupons, Due March 1, 1912, 

First National Bank, Coupon, 1911 Issue, 

Due March 1,1912, 
First National Bank, Coupon, 1911 Issue, 

Due Sept. 1, 1912, 
First National Bank, Interest, Registered 

Bond, State, 

Total, 



$5 35 


1 


01 


130 43 


25 


49 


325 31 


14 


34 


4 00 


29 


38 


100 


23 


39 


01 


6 


66 


3 


50 


1 


00 


2 


00 


14 


62 


777 


50 


120 


00 


120 00 


80 


00 


18,184 


81 



131 



CO 
*°~ 

T— I 



CO 

©^ 

T— I 



a 



m 
O 

Q 

«1 



O 



CO 
© 



bfl 

g 

03 

rH 



CD 



o *o o id ^h o 



00N00OO5O 
€# CQ lO CQ t-h CO^ 

H H CO H LO 



■CO 
CO 





O t^ ^H i-h 


(N 




© Th O IO 


© 




O t-H © CO 


tH 




OHNiC 


^h 




© CO ^ © 


^ 










ONNO 


© 




00 ^H 


© 




m^ ^ 


<N 




T3 


€^ 




d 






3 




m 


fc 




H 


bfi 




i— i 


£ 




h— 1 


15 r 




r-3 






1— 1 


02 -3 




W 


i— i o 




O 


-. c3 $ 




l-H 


hD-r; j_ 




^ 


Bonds outstandin 
Town Loan (Spe< 
Town Loan Const 
Surplus, 






iO ^ © CO 


<M 




r-i <N © © 


© 




© GO iO i—i 


^h 




iOhcOO 


^h 




WNHN 


^1 




rH GO 


<s 




00 ^H 


© 






<N 



5- 



<3 

<3 - 



SI 



7) 


• rH 


H 


C^ 


cS 


b£ 


ft 


+3 


03 


CD 



o 



02 

H 

m 
< 



-a 

■HP 

o 
cu 

"o 
o 

2 m * 3 

g w a bJO 

-S fe ° s 

illl 



132 
WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT 

WATER RECEIPTS. 

Domestic, $7,665 18 

Meters, 4,230 89 

Uncollected, 718 24 



$12,614 31 



OUTSTANDING WATER BONDS. 

Issue of 1894, due one each year, $2,000 00 

Issue of 1897, due 1917, 10,000 00 

Issue of 1900, due 1930, 23,000 00 

Issue of 1902, due 1932, 9,000 00 

Issue of 1903, due 1933, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1904, due 1934, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1906, due 1936, 14,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due 1937, 4,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due $500 each year, 7,500 00 

Issue of 1911, due $500 " " 5,500 00 



$85,000 00 



133 



CO 

Q 
& 
O 
o 
w 

w 

CO 

p 

O 

B 

w 
o 



CO 

M 
3 

o 
w 

s 

o 
o 



e <3 



CQ 



e 



t 



Is 



^ & 



F 



■» Si? 

.2 2 



(M W "O CO lO W (N H N CO ■* 



MCOOOOOCO^iCTfiCrfTJ' 

axooxxosooooiff.oi 



i-O M CO N N C-l (N LO 05 O (N M 



COOOOCOiXJNCOCOOXO) 
OOiO^fOiHOMQLOCCiM 
NCO K 00^00<N05 i O i O_q_X i (N'* 
lO~ CO t>T tJh" tC c4~ CO~ io of o" eo o~ 
COCO(MC<IO<ICOCOCOCOCO(NCO 



oooooooooooo 
ooocoooooooo 

© ©^ ©^ r-i !>_ 00^ 00 "tf rH ©^ ©_ CO 
!> O O ©~ l> CO ^~ rtf tC o" TtT oo" 

rHMNNN^OcOiCTtHMOi 

(M(NHHH(NCOIN(N(NHH 



OOOOOOOOOOOO O 

oooooooooooo o 

IC C^OO O^^^^^LO^O^t^tO 00 

eci>Vr Tt^cTTtTocft^c^'-H'irf'O co" 

NNNOOO'fOJH^TfiO OS 

t^CO^C^I^O^^T^^t^T^O'-^ 00 

co" co~ ift u$ iS i>^ cT go" i>~ i>~ »o" co" 



.^OiOOiOOOOiCiOOOiC 
^^OCON«(NiO(NON(NO 



mic^L'Tcoo'-oNtoocoNoo 

j3«O»O(N(MCOiOOi00»OiO(NCO 



J_ 03 ,-H - 

~ h s_ • — 






s-Sp 






■=3 ^ t* o O o> 






134 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Lincoln, Mass., Jan. 31, 1912. 
To The Town of Lincoln:— 

The Board of Cemetery Commissioners respectfully 
submit the following report: 

At the Annual Town Meeting of March 4, 1912, the 
Town voted under Article 13 of the Warrant to accepl 
the provisions of the revised laws of Chapter 78 anc 
particularly Sections 21 to 25 of said Acts which refei 
to Cemeteries. 

The Town also appropriated ($250.00 ) Two hundre< 
and fifty dollars to be used for Cemetery work. At ai 
early meeting of the Board the following organizatioi 
was made: — Julius E. Eveleth, Chairman; Joseph S. 
Hart, Clerk. 

During the year the usual work of cleaning has beei 
attended to. A number of trees that were no longer use- 
ful or ornamental have been removed and those that il 
seemed desirable to retain carefully pruned with a vie 1 * 
of saving them as long as possible. 

In this connection we wish to suggest that many more 
should be removed, the larger part of which are locate( 
on private lots. In the opinion of your Commissioners 
by so doing a decided improvement would be made in th( 
appearance of the ground. We refer particularly to th( 
"pitch pines" that have withstood the storms of man; 
winters and have outlived their usefulness. Without 
limbs or foliage they certainly are not ornamental and at 
most their future existence must be short. With 
feeling that the wishes of private owners should be r< 
spected we have so far confined the cutting to the un- 
occupied parts of the Cemetery. 



135 

Suggestions from private owners regarding the matter 
would aid the Board materially in their work of the com- 
ing year. 

The planting of more trees and a few clumps of orna- 
mental shrubbery at the various approaches seems a de- 
sirable feature of the future. 

Referring to the matter of deeds from the Town to 
private owners of lots the Board respectfully requests all 
such to notify it in writing at their early convenience, 
stating their lot number or a description of the location, 
that a comparison may be made with the lists in the 
possession of the Board. By so doing they will not only 
assist the Board in its work but will also assure a full 
investigation of their claims. When identified the owner 
will receive a deed of the property from the Town estab- 
lishing an ownership that will save any future disappoint- 
ment to themselves or their families. 

As the money becomes available from the various 
sources of income it is the desire of the Board to improve 
the triangular Cemetery and the one near the Town Hall. 
The matter of grading would add much to their appear- 
ance and would be a permanent improvement. 

The total cemetery area comprises about thirteen 
acres and to keep so large an expanse of ground in even 
passable condition an appropriation from the Town of an 
amount equal to that of last year is respectfully requested 
by the Board, and should an increase of $50.00 be made 
it could be used to good advantage. 

According to the Legislative provision under which we 
are now acting the Board of Commissioners has no longer 
a Treasurer. All monies pertaining to the department 
are to be held by the Treasurer of the Town. 

JULIUS E. EVELETH, 
GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 
JOSEPH S. HART, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



136 



Town Treasurer in Account with the Lincoln 
Cemetery Commissioners 



Received of Cryus S. Chap in for lot $20 00 

Received of C. S. Smith 337 01 



Total $357 01 

Deposited in Middlesex Inst, for Savings . . . . 357 01 



The following is a list of the Securities of the Lincoln Cemetery Com- 
missioners : — 

Four Shares American Sugar Ref. Co., preferred stock. 
Three Shares Union Pacific R. R. Co., preferred stock. 
Two shares Fitchburg R. R. Co.. preferred stock. 

Also the following funds for the care of lots in Cemetery, all of which are 
deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings: — 
Orilla J. Flint Fund, $300.00, interest accrued ... $12 12 

Samuel Hartwell Fund. $300.00, interest accrued . ... 1212 

John N. Pierce Fund, $500,00. interest accrued ... 15 10 

Maria L. Thompson Fund, $500.00, interest accrued ... 20 20 

Annie A. Ray Fund, $300.00, interest accrued .... 12 12 

(Signed) CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Town Treasurer. 
E. &. C.E. 









137 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 

The Tree Warden submits to the Town his report for 
the year 1912. 

The work of this department this year has been mostly 
against the brown tail and gipsy moths, and elm leaf 
beetle, and has been carried on as it was the previous 
year, cutting off the brown tail nests and cresoting gipsy 
moth nests along the roadsides, and on private property, 
where owners wish to pay for the labor. Tanglefoot 
bands were also put on trees along the roadside in the 
badly infested places, to keep the trees near the road 
from being stripped. Spraying began the last week in 
May, when the foliage was sufficiently developed to 
hold the spray, and continued until the last week in 
June, during this time all the trees on the highways, and 
about two hundred acres of woodland were sprayed with 
very good results. Commencing in July the underbrush, 
on the roadside on a good many of the highways was cut 
and piled up, and burned later on stormy days, when the 
men could not work on the trees, and there was no danger 
from the fires. The dead wood was also removed from 
the trees in the cemetery, and trees on the highways where 
it was necessary. 

In reference to the gipsy moth question in this Town, 
it is a serious one; the residential section is in good con- 
dition, but comprises but a small part of the Town. The 
highways are almost all backed up by woodlands where 
there is never any work done, and makes it very hard in 
some places to keep the street trees from being stripped, 
the woodlands, however, which have been most badly im- 
fested are now comparatively clear of the gipsy moth. 



138 

This condition is a result of the cholera or what is called 
the wilt disease, which occurs whenever the caterpillars 
become overcrowded, and consequently poorly fed. 
Enough caterpillars, however are always left about the 
borders of these lots to start again. It then takes them 
about three years to increase sufficiently to strip the 
trees. This disease has been artificially produced by 
the State Moth Department, and distributed among the 
different towns. We received enough of this disease to 
plant over five hundred acres, which was put out accord- 
ing to the directions. While results of the disease were 
not very good in the first part of the season in some 
places, I found a good many dead caterpillars and not so 
many nests later in the season. 

I have made arrangements with the State to procure 
a large amount of the disease this year, it is not expensive, 
all the expense attached to it is the time it takes in dis- 
tributing it in the different places where there is no work 
done against the gipsy moth. The brown tail moth con- 
ditions change from year to year. Their flight is mostly 
controlled by the winds; if there are high winds during 
the early part of July when the moths are in their flight 
they will be blown from one place to another, laying their 
eggs wherever they happen to light. Several plantings 
of the brown tail fungeous have been made with very 
encouraging results. 

The elm leaf beetle presents a serious problem for the 
Town's consideration. This year we carried on the process 
of spraying for the gipsy moth and the beetle together. 
This has been possible as they are both feeding on the 
tree at the same time, and it made a saving to the Town 
of a few hundred dollars. The time has now come how- 
ever, when we will have to give our elm trees a little more 
time and more arsenite of lead if we are going to save 
them from the ravages of the beetle. 

The Town now owns three power sprayers and equip- 



139 

ment which have been used for a number of years in this 
work, two of which I have used and attained good results 
from under difficulties at times; the other one was divided 
into two parts so as to make it easier to handle in the 
woodlands spraying, but it proved a failure and was never 
put together. I used the different parts of it on the 
other sprayers when we wanted them. It would cost 
about two hundred dollars to put this sprayer in shape 
and then we would have an old sprayer. I think the 
Town had better sell this sprayer and purchase a new 
one, as we can get help from the State this year. I would 
like to have the Town take some action on the matter. 

The total expenditure of this department this year was 
$4,264.58. We received $2,177.12 from private work, and 
$448.27 from the State, leaving a net cost to the Town 
of $1,639.19, and a unexpended balance of $861.81. 

I recommend that $2,500.00 be appropriated this 
year: $2,0000.00 for moth work and $500.00 for tree 
work and elm leaf beetle. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



140 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Trustees have the honor to submit the following 
statement, and financial showing, as respects the doings 
of the Library for the year just closed. 

CHARLES F. ADAMS, 

Chairman Trustees. 



141 



OOOO^OOOOOOONHHNLOOOOOONMNOJOOO 



6 &**£> £*> 

O.S bote's 
o-3 - * £ 



£ § a rt a 



o 



: 2 y - a 









E <S 

-3.2 

c ^ 



<QO 






9 a> c j .— ' 



! - - hJ fe Se5 

! 0^3 2^ 

I dT3 ii)i(i3 

! <u-S M"EPQ 

pq S-o 5 , o 



-So 
* en 



■2-^,2 5 
'E S ^ 



Hi" 

h;h1! 



P*S 



!££ 



H^r 



iOOOpHHlnlOOi?) 



L0010 00 00 03 00HHN 
NOO^OOJiOOOiOO 

MOOONMONCCOO 
■* O 00 Tt< "2 O CO ■* i-< 
Tt<CO<M 



ft M » o & 2 _ 

^ M — o i — ■ I <d 3 
E E^hI oal-lpq 

^ ££-£=: 2 g. 2m 



Hh 



<d a> l ~ 9 W<j« 



o o o <u aiX! o3"3.2 



142 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC 
LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEB. i, 1913. 

Number of volumes in Library Feb. 1, 1912, 9,459 

Increase by purchase. 201 

Increase by gift. 11 

Increase by binding periodicals. 4 

Total increase, 216 

Number of volumes rebound, 34 
Number of volumes withdrawn, replaced by new 

editions, 36 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1913, 9,675 

Total delivery of books for year, 7,845 

Largest delivery in one day (Aug. 17), 120 

Smallest delivery in one day (Oct. 23), 37 

Number of days Library was open, 103 



14^ 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Gifts of books, periodicals, etc., have been received 
from the following persons: — Charles F. Adams, Esq., 
Mr. Henry Adams, Miss C. Chapin, Miss A. C. Coolidge, 
Mrs. Alice Floyd, Mr. A. R. Graves, Mr. Robert Pierce, 
Mrs. Henry J. Richardson, Mrs. Anna Snelling, Mrs. A. C. 
Wheelwright, Rev. L. M. Zimmerman, Mrs. B. Pietersz. 



144 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



ACCESSIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR 1912. 



BIOGRAPHY. 

Adams, Henry. Life of George Cabot Lodge .... 633.23 

Antin, Mary. The promised land 531.24 

Bradford, Gamaliel, Jr. Lee, the American 633.20 

Bradley, Arthur Granville. Owen Glyndur and the last straggle 
for Welsh independence, with a brief sketch of Welsh 

history 613.6 

Cantlie, James and Jones, C. S., Sun Yat Sen ;. and the awaken- 
ing of China . 613.13 

Conrad, Joseph. A personal record 531.23 

Cook, E. T. Life of John Ruskin 643.1 

Cornwallis-West, Mrs. George. Reminiscences of Lady Ran- 
dolph Churchill 643.2 

Cortissoz, Royal. John LaFarge: a memoir and a study . . 633.21 

indicates the book was a gift. 
Cullom, Shelby M. Fifty years of public service: Personal 
recollections of Shelby M. Cullom. Senior U. S. Senator 

from Illinois •. 643.11 

Greenslet, Ferris. James Russell Lowell 643.12 

Kauser, Elizabeth J., Editor. My story: By Tom L. Johnson . 643.5 
Howe, Maud. The eleventh hour in the life of Julia Ward Howe 542 . 13 
Hyndman, Henry Mayers. The record of an adventurous life . 633.22 
^Lincoln, Abraham. "Abe" Lincoln's yarns and stories . . 641.1 
Lounsbury, Thomas R. Early literary career of Robert Brown- 
ing. Four lectures 643.9 

McGiffert, Arthur Cushman. Martin Luther: The man and 

his work 643 . 3 

Ricolay, Helen. Personal traits of Abraham Lincoln . . 643.14 
Page, Thomas Nelson. Robert E. Lee. Man and soldier . . 643. 10 
Pearson, Henry Greenleaf. An American railroad builder: 

John Murray Forbes 643.7 

Rideing, William H. Many celebrities: and a few others . 531.21 

Rideout, Henry Milner. William Jones: Indian, cowboy, 

American scholar, and anthropologist in the field. . 636.9 

*Stafford, Wendell Phillips. Wendell Phillips: a centennial ora- 
tion delivered at Park street Church, Boston, November 
28,1911 643.8 






145 



Stewart, William R. The philanthropic work of Josephine Shaw 
Lowell: containing a biographical sketch of her life, to- 
gether with a selection of her public papers and private 
letters. Collected and arranged for publication by- 
William R. Stewart, president of the New York State 
Board of Charities . 531 . 22 

HISTORY. 

Addison, Albert Christopher. Romantic stoiy of the May- 
flower Pilgrims; and its place in the life of today . . 352.8 

Baring, Maurice. The Russian people 352.10 

Birkhead, Alice. Tales from Irish history 366.9 

Haskin, Frederic J. The American government . . . . 366.10 
Miller, Francis Trevelyan. Photographic history of the Civil 

War. 10 Vols 

Contents. — Vol. 1. The opening battles. 
Two years of grim war. 
The decisive battles. 
The Cavalry. 
Forts and artillery. 
The navies. 
Prisons and hospitals. 
Soldier life, secret service. 
Poetry and eloquence of Blue and Gray. 
Armies and leaders. 
. Social forces in American history .... 366 . 8 
*Smith, Albert. History of the town of Peterborough, N. H. . 352.9 

Trevelyan, Sir George Otto. George the third and Charles Fox: 

the concluding part of the American Revolution. Vol. 1 366. 11 

TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION. 

Cabot, William B. In Northern Labrador 431.19 

Comer, William R. Landmarks in the "Old Bay State" . . 447.4 

Edwards, Albert. Panama: The country and the people . . 447.2 

Grenfell, Wilfred T. Down North on the Labrador . . . 447.3 
Henson, Matthew A. Negro explorer at the North Pole; with a 
foreword by Robert E. Peary, and an introduction by 

Booker T. Washington 431.18 

Holland, Clive. The Belgians at home 431.15 

Hutton, Edward. Venice and Venetia 431.16 

Marks, Jeanette. Gallant little Wales: Sketches of its people, 

places, and customs 437 . 13 

Mason, Caroline Atwater. The spell of France .... 436.28 

*Mont Saint Michel and Chartres 436 . 29 

Muir, J. The Gosemite 431 . 17 

Shuster, William M. Strangling of Persia 414.20 



Vol. 


2. 


Vol. 


3. 


Vol. 


4. 


Vol. 


5. 


Vol. 


6. 


Vol. 


7. 


Vol. 


8. 


Vol. 


9. 


Vol. 


10. 


Simons, A. M 



146 

SCIENCE. USEFUL ARTS. 

Bailey, L. H. Manual of gardening: A practical guide to the 
making of home grounds and the growing of flowers, fruits, 

and vegetables for home use 137.23 

Cafifin, Charles H. Story of French painting 141.24 

Drennan, Georgia Torrey . Ever blooming roses : for the out-door 
garden of the amateur; their culture; habits, description, 
care, nativity, parentage; with authentic guides to the 
selection of ever blooming varieties of roses . . . . 214.8 
Ely, Helena Rutherford. The practical flower-garden . . . 137.24 

Henderson, C. Hanford. Payday 141.10 

Ingersoll, Ernest. Animal competitors: Profit and loss from the 

wild four- footed tenants of the farm 141.21 

Isola, Antonia. Simple Italian cookery' 146 29 

Kirby, A. M. Daffodils, naicissus; and how to grow them, as 
hardy plants for cut flowers. With a guide to the best 

varieties 137.25 

Lincoln, Jonathan Thayer. The factory . . . . 141.20 

McKeever, William A. Farm boys and girls .... 146.28 
McKready, Kelvin. Beginner's star-book: An easy guide to 
the stars and to the astromonical uses of the opera glass. 

the field glass, and the telescope 121 . 5 

MontesorrL Maria. The montessori method : scientific pedagogy 
as applied to child education in "The Children's 
Houses" with additions and revisions by the Author. 
Translated from the Italian by Anne E. George, with an 
introduction by Prof. Henry W. Holmes of Harvard, 

University 141.22 

Peabody, Robert Swain. An Architect's sketch book . . . 141.23 
Schauffler, Robert Haven. The musical amateur: a book on 

the human side of music. 145.28 

Smith, Nora Archibald. Home made kindergarten . . . 214.9 



RELIGION. PHILOSOPHY. 

Dinsmore, Charles Allen. The new light on the old truth . . 1134. 14 

Black, Hugh. Comfort 1134.13 

Grenfell, Wilfred T. The adventure of life. Being the William 

Belden Noble lectures for 1911 1137.4 

Hyde, William DeWitt. Five great philosophies of life . 1137.3 

Palmer, George Herbert. Problem of freedom .... 1137.5 
Royce, Josiah. Sources of religious insight. Lectures delivered 
before Lake Forest College on the foundation of the late 

William Bross 1134.15 



147 



FICTION. 



Alexander, Miriam. Beyond the law- 
Allen, Frances Newton Symmes. The plain path . 
Allen, James Lane. The doctor's Christmas eve . 
Andrews, Mary Raymond Shipman. The marshal 
Atkinson, Eleanor. Greyfriar's Bobby 
Bangs, John Kendrick. Little book of Christmas 
Bangs, Mary Rogers. High Bradford . 
Barclay, Florence L. Following the star . 
Barr, Amelia E. Maid of old New York . 
Bennett, Arnold. Hilda Lessw r ays 
Bjornstjerne, Bjornson. The fisher lass 
Bryant, Marguerite. Christopher Hibbault: Road maker 
Castle, William R.,./r. The green vase . 
Child. Richard Washburn. Jim Hands . 
*Coolidge, Asenath Carver. Between two Rebellions 
Davis, William Stearns. Friar of Wittenberg 
*Day, Holman. The skipper and the skipped . 
Deiand, Margaret. The voice .... 
Doyle, Arthur Conan. The lost world 
Dragoumis, Julia D. Tales of a Greek Island 
Erskine, Payne. The mountain girl . 
Farnol, Jeffrey. The money moon .... 
Freeman, Mar}' E Wilkins. Butterfly House 
Hopkins, William John. Conserning Sally. . 
Lancaster, Hewes. The one and the other . 
Lincoln, Joseph C. Cap'n Warren's wards . 

The Postmaster 

Little, Frances. Lady and Sada Sen. Sequel to Lady 

Decoration 

London, Jack. Adventure 

Lucas, E V. London Lavender .... 
Martin, Helen R. The fighting; Doctor . 
Mason, A. E. W. The turnstill .... 
Munger, Dell H. Wind before the dawn . 
Nicholson, Meredith. A Hoosier-Chronicle . 
Palmer, Frederick. Over the pass 
Schauffler, Rachel Capen. The goodly fellowship 
Sedgwick, Anne D. pseud. Tante. 
Sienkwick, Henryk. In desert and wilderness . 
Smith, F. Hopkinson. Arm chair at the Inn . 
Stevenson, Burton E. Mystery of the Boule Cabinet 
Stewart, Charles D. The wrong woman . 

Sullivan T. R. Heart of us 

Tompkin, Juliet Wilbor. Pleasures and palaces; being the home 
making and adventures of Marie Rose 



of the 



753.3 
753.1 

753 . 20 

752.5 

753.11 

752.8 

757.25 

754.24 

753.13 

757.26 

917.30 

753.5 

753.6 

753.19 

754 . 24 

753.21 

754.20 

752.1 

752.12 

917.29 

755.23 

754 19 

754.14 

752.7 

753.9 

754.8 

753.23 

752.9 
754.21 
752.3 
753.8 
753.25 
755 . 24 
753.12 
917.26 
753.18 
753.16 
753.24 
755.22 
753.23 
753.17 
"754.23 

753.4 



148 



Vachell, Horace Annesley. Blinds down 753.15 

Vance, Louis Joseph. The bandbox 753.10 

Van Dyke. Henry. The unknown quantity 752.6 

Van Loan, Charles E. The ten thousand dollar arm; and other 

t ales of the big League 917 . 28 

Van Slyke, Lucille Baldwin. Eve's other children . . . 752.11 

Waller, Mary E. Sanna of the Island town 752.2 

Wells, H. G. Marriage 752.2 

Wemyss, Mary C. E. Prudent Priscilla . . . . . 752.10 

Wentworth, Patricia. The Devil's wind 753.26 

Williamson, C. N. and A. M. Guests of Hercules . . . 753.7 

Wright, Harold Bell. Their yesterdays 752.4 

MISCELLANEOUS 



Babcock, Lilian W. Pin money suggestions .... 1537.10 

Beesley, Lawrence. Loss of the Titanic: The story and its 

lessons 1531.5 

Burroughs, John. Time and change 1537.11 

Contents — The long road; The divine abyss; The spell of 
the Yosemite; Throught the eyes of the geologist; Holidays 
in Hawaii; The old ice flood; The friendly soil; Primal 
energies; scientific faith; "The worm striving to be man;" 
The phantoms behind us; The hazards of the past; The 
gospel of nature. 

Clarke, Helen Archibald. The poet's New England . 

Crook, Colonel W. H. Memories of the White House: Being 
personal recollections of ColonelW. H. Crook. Sometimes 
body guard to Lincoln, since disbursing officer of the 
Executives 

Grant, Robert. Convictions of a grandfather .... 

Hillis, Mrs. Newell D wight. The American woman and her 
home 

Read, George H. Last cruise of the Saginaw .... 

Smyth, Herbert Weir, Editor. Harvard essays on classical subjects. 

Contents : — The new criticism of Roman art ; By assistant _ 

Professor of Classical archaeology; Notions of humanity 
among the Greeks, by Charles Burton Gulick, Professor of 
Greek; An ancient letter- writer- Alciphoron, by Carl 
Newell Jackson, Assistant Professor of Greek; Greek and 
Roman tendencies, by C. H. Moore, Professor of Latin; 
Some aspects of an ancient city, by M. H. Morgan, late 
Professor of Philology; Plato and pragmatism, by C. P. 
Parker, Prof essor of Greek and Latin ; Ovid and the spirit of 
of metamorphosis, by E. K. Rand, Professor of Latin; 
Greek conceptions of immortality from Homer to Plato, 
By H. W. Smyth, Eliot Professor of Greek literature . . 1532 . 24 



1531.3 



1337.13 
1532.23 

1337.12 
1531.6 



149 



Storey, Moorfield. Reform of legal procedure .... 1533.20 

Wilson, Calvin Dill. Working one's way through college and 
university; A guide to opportunities to earn an education 
at American colleges and universities 1533.19 

Winter, William. Shakespeare on the stage .... 153.14 

POETRY. 

Musgrove, Eugene R., Editor. White hills in poetry; An 
anthology, wth an introduction by Samuel M. Crothers, 
and with illustrations from photographs .... 1426.20 

Norton, Grace Fallow. Little Gray songs from Saint Joseph's . 1436.15 

WORKS OF REFERENCE. PERIODICALS. PAMPHLETS. 

*Adams, Charles Francis. The Trent affair. An historical 

retrospect, (Pamphlet) B.M6.13 

*American Church silver of the seventeenth and eighteenth centu- 
ries. With a few. pieces of domestic plate. Exhibited at 
the Museum of Fine Arts, July to December, 1911. 
Boston . . . . Ref . R.R 

Encyclopaedia Britannica, Eleventh edition, with index. 29 

vols. Ref. R.R. 

Harper's Monthly magazine. Vols. 122-123, for 1911. 

Encyclopaedia of etiquette What to write; What to wear; 
What to do; What to say. A book of manners for every- 
day use Ref. R.R. 

Pierce, Robert Morris, Editor. *Dictionary of aviation . . Ref. R.R. 

^Dictionary of hard words Ref. R.R. 

nVilhelm Tell, by Johann C. F. Von Schiller. The idea- 
phonic texts for acquiring languages. Seiies 1. German 
texts for English readers ...... . Ref. R.R. 

St. Nichols. Vols. 38, 1 38 2 for 1911. 

*Ticonderoga. A memorial tablet at Ticonderoga. ( A Pamphlet ) 

B.W.6.14 

*Reed, William Howell. Heroic story of the United States Sani- 
tary Commission. 1861-1865. (A pamphlet.) . . P. B. 6.11 

*Lawrence, Robert Means. Rev Amos Adams, A.M. (1728- 
1775.) Patriot minister of Roxbury. Massachusetts. 
And his American ancestry. (A pamphlet ) . . . P. B. 6 . 12 

BOOKS FOR YOUNG READERS. 

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, Translator. Story of a cat. Translated 

from the French of Emile De La Bedolliere .... 831.16 

Brown, Abbie Farwell. John of the woods 1241 . 12 

Their City Christmas 1241.7 

Brown, Alice. Secret of the clan 1241 . 13 

Brown, Helen Dawes. Two college girls 1241 . 17 



150 

Bruce, Mrs. C. G. Kashmir. (Peeps at many lands) . 831.26 

Bryant, Sara Cone. Best stories to tell to children . . . 1241.3 

Burgess, Thornton W. Mother West Wind's children 831.20 

Old Mother West Wind 831.19 

Cooke, Edmund Vance. The story club 1241.4 

Craik, Dinah Maria (Miss Mulock). Little lame Prince . . 831.18 

Dowd, Emma C. Polly of the Hospital Staff . . . . 841 . 24 

Fox, Frank. Australia. (Peeps at many lands ) . . . . 831.25 

The British Empire . 831 . 24 

Oceania 831.23 

Greenaway, Kate. Under the window: Pictures and rhymes for 

children 1241 . 2 

Hare, Christopher. The good Knight : Without fear and without 
reproach. Retold from the old chronicles of the Loyal 

Servitors and others 831.22 

Hodges, George. Castle of Zion. Stories from the Old Testa- 
ment 1241.10 

Saints and heroes. To the end of the middle ages . . 831.23 

Hoy t, Elizabeth. Little Chum Club . . . . . . 1241.15 

Hoyt, Elizabeth Editor. Santa Claus dolls 1241 . 5 

Johnson, Owen. Stover at Yale 841.23 

Keiffer, Harry M. Recollections of a drummer boy . . . 1241.9 

Lagerlof, Selma. Further wonderful adventures of Nils . . 842.15 
Lang, Mrs. Andrew. All sorts of stories book. Edited by Andrew 

Lang 832.24 

Lovejoy, Mary I. Doll's story book 1241.6 

Mabie, Hamilton Dwight and Stephens,. Kate. Heroines every 
child should know. Tales for young people of the world 

heroines of all ages 831 . 17 

Price, Overon T. The land we live in. The boy's book of 

Conservation 831.15 

Rhys, Ernest. English fairy book 1241.11 

Rolt- Wheeler, Francis. Boy with the U. S. Census . . . 844.22 
Boy with the U.S. Survey. With thirty-seven illustrations 
from photographs taken by the U. S. Geological Sur- 
vey 1235.24 

Seawell, Molly Elliot. Son of Columbus 1241.14 

Smith, E. Boyd. The sea shore book: Bob and Betty's summer 

. with Captian Hawes 1241.8 

Smith, Mary P. Wells. Boy captive of old Deerfield . . . 846.20 

Webster, Jean. When Patty went to College .... 1241 . 16 

Winter, Milo. Billy Popgun 1241.1 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



OF THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1912 




152 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman, Term expires 1914 
EDWARD R. FARRAR, Secretary, Term expires 1913 
Mrs. ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, Term expires, 1915 

Superintendent of Schools 
C. S. LYMAN 

Supervisor of Drawing and Manual Training 
WALTER F. BRACKETT 

Supervisor of Cooking and Sewing 
MRS. ABBIE P. SMITH 

Supervisor of Music 
MRS. HARRIET J. BARTLETT 

Teachers 

Lincoln Grammar Grades VII — VIII 
MARION H. COOK 

Lincoln Grammar Grades V — VI 
DOROTHY H. HAVILAND 

Lincoln Primary Grades III — IV 
JEAN G. ALLAN 

Lincoln Primary Grades I — II 
HATTIE B. HEATH 

South Primary Grades I-II-III 
GERTRUDE E. BROOKS 

Special Teacher 
ELIZABETH R. CUSHING 

Truant Officer 
JAMES T. LAIRD 

Janitors 

Lincoln 
EDWARD BANNON 

South 
EDMUND R. DAVIS 



153 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

At the close of the Spring Term Miss Chapin resigned 
her position as teacher, and closed her connection with 
the Lincoln Schools, after a service of forty-three years. 
So long a service in the schools of the Town is not only 
most unusual in these days, but it is also indicative of 
the interest in the affairs of the Town which has been 
shown by other members of the same family. 

In recognition of Miss Chapin's long service and interest 
and devotion to our schools the committee adopted the 
following : — 

Lincoln, Mass., June, 1912. 
RESOLVED:— 

In accepting the resignation of Miss Carrie B. Chapin 
from her position as Principal of the Grammar School 
at the end of the present school year, after a continuous 
period of 43 years of teaching in the schools of Lincoln, 
the Committee feels that the long and faithful service 
she has rendered the Town should receive special recog- 
nition. 

Her devotion to the highest interests of her pupils, 
her endeavor, while instructing their minds, to set before 
them right views of life, to secure respect for rightful 
authority, both in the school room and out of it, and her 
sense of responsibility for the proper use and care of all 
school property, have placed the Town in her debt be- 
yond the power of her salary to repay. 

There are many now engaged in the active duties of 
life whose lives bear the impress of her influence, and 
who gratefully acknowledge the debt that they owe to 
her. 



154 

Her life in the community has always been such as to 
strengthen and never to impair her influence in the school- 
room, and is a strong argument for a lengthened tenure 
of the teacher's office. 

To the Town she has given the best years and strength 
of her life, and it is fitting that honorable mention should 
be made at this time of the high character and full meas- 
ure of the service she has rendered. 

VOTED: That a copy of the foregoing resolution be 
sent to Miss Chapin by the Secretary, and that the reso- 
lution be published with the Report of the Committee 
in the Town Report. 

Miss Marion H. Cook was elected to take Miss 
Chapin's palce, and she began her work with the Fall 
term. 

The plan of shorter hours for the school sessions, re- 
ferred to in the last report, has been continued. As will 
be seen by the report of the Superintendent this plan is 
showing beneficial results. 

We are fortunate in our corps of teachers and the 
school work is progressing harmoniously, and we believe 
efficiently. 

The report of the Superintendent and the usual sta- 
tistics are appended. 

HENRY E. WARNER, 
EDWARD R. FARRAR, 
ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT. 












1 

9x ^^B^H 










t; 



l& 






V&9& 






m 






Mj 



WW 



mwMm 

B m 



— 



■HHBEoH 



■HSror 






*# 



■ 



ggjgrara BMHOH 






ifiii 



■n 



» 



1 ■ -' ■ ' 






■ 






155 



Summary of School Expenses 



Superintendent and Teachers . 


$4,849.00 


High School Tuition 


1,636.50 


High School Transportation . 


673.60 


Janitors 


620.70 


Water rates 


139.11 


School Supplies 


392.74 


Repairs, etc 


95.56 


Fuel 


489.81 


Miscellaneous 


46.23 


Medical Inspector 


200.00 




$9,143.25 


Barges and Transportation 


2,047.35 


Total 


$11,190.60 



156 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the School Committee of the Town of Lincoln : — 

At the end of another school year we are glad to report 
a steady growth towards greater educational efficiency. 
Each year the teachers are working a little more effec- 
tively and the children are gaining more in power. Al- 
though we know our schools are far from perfect, it is 
ever our aim to keep our educational curve rising slowly 
towards perfection even though we know the schools 
will never reach that mark. We are constantly trying 
with a good degree of success to reduce friction and waste 
to a minimum. Even after the long vacation, when 
most of the children enter other school rooms and take 
up new tasks, both teachers and pupils slip quickly into 
the harness, and very soon all are working as easily as if 
there had been no long break. This means that the 
wheels of the school system are running smoothly. 

We are familiar with the severe criticism which the 
press and public speakers often launch against the public 
schools, and although we know that much of this criti- 
cism is foolish and unreasonable, yet some of it is just 
and should be gladly received. We believe that the 
public schools are so strong and have such a magnificent 
history that they can rise above the severest criticism. 
The free public school is the only institution that can 
properly train and assimulate our heterogeneous popula- 
tion. 

Co-operation 

Our schools are, I believe, in better condition than 
ever before. The spirit of co-operation, so fully mani- 



157 

fested among all our teachers, is bringing about excel- 
lent results in all departments. The spirit, which the 
children show towards their work, is of the right kind 
and that which makes for a good school. There seems 
to be a general disposition to obey the school rules and 
regulations, so that the general atmosphere of the rooms 
is such, that a visitor naturally feels that everything is 
going well. There is still some friction on the barges, 
but we believe it is slowly being reduced. The barge 
question has been and always will be very difficult to 
handle satisfactorily to all. There are times when each 
family and each individual must be willing to yield in- 
dividual good to the general good of all. 

The Playground 

The playground activities have had a large share in 
the success of the past year. Some of the recesses have 
been devoted to organized play, the teachers going out 
with the children, organizing all of them into suitable 
and convenient groups, regulated by size and strength and 
often by sex. Then these groups have been taught a 
variety of active games, which give the children much 
needed, vigorous exercises and a great deal of pleasure. 
The teachers make sure that all the children have an 
active part in these games. 

Various ball games are the favorite sports: for the 
larger boys baseball in the Spring and during the rest 
of the year football in modified form to suit season and 
weather conditions; basket ball among the larger girls; 
medicine ball throwing among all the boys and girls ; and 
the rubber hand balls for the very small children. A 
large variety of very interesting ball games has thus been 
learned, and the children play them so much that the 
balls are fast wearing out. We can assure the giver of 
these balls that his gift has been thoroughly appreciated. 

Running games, the tug-of-war, and other games where 



158 

the team of children and not the individual is the unit, 
have been taught. On stormy days these various games 
in modified forms are played indoors, the older pupils 
in the basement and the younger ones in the rooms and 
corridors. 

To encourage initiative in the children and to prevent 
any group depending too much upon the teachers, we 
have many recesses for free play, merely telling the chil- 
dren to be sure that all have a chance to play. By giving 
the balls and other apparatus to different children many 
have been encouraged to assume leadership so now there 
are many leaders who can quickly form teams amd run 
a game. 

Miss Cushing, who has been especially interested in 
this department writes, "The past year shows what a 
little organizing of play can do towards improving the 
attitude of the children towards games and to each other. 
In our school it has done much to help the playground 
spirit, so that the so-called playground troubles are 
very, very few." 

The afternoon before Thanksgiving was chosen for 
Field Day, at which time teams from the different rooms 
took part in a variety of races and games and tugs-of- 
war. This field day was greatly enjoyed by both pupils 
and teachers, and stimulated their interest in playground 
activities. 

We are fortunate in having so good a school yard for 
all kinds of games. In winter it is suited for coasting, 
which the children greatly enjoy after every snow storm. 
With a little work a place for skating can be prepared. 
We are all ready to work on a skating rink as soon as we 
have suitable weather. 

School Physician 

The school physician and the nurse under his direction 
are doing much for the physical comfort and- health of 



159 

the children. The nurse is showing the children how to 
keep clean and neat, and free from some of the physical 
troubles which beset so may children. Both parents and 
children should gladly welcome this aid to physical im- 
provement. There are still too many children whose 
eyes and teeth need attention, but the parents do not 
realize the importance of remedying these defects. 

Short Sessions 

In our last year's report we told of trying a shorter 
session in our schools; beginning at 8.45 A.M. and closing 
at 1.15 P. M. with a recess of fifteen minutes beginning 
at 10.15 A.M. and another beginning at 11.45 A.M. This 
plan has been continued for three days a week through- 
out the year, excepting that recently we lengthened the 
second recess to twenty minutes. On Wednesdays and 
Thursdays we lengthen the school day so as to close at 
2. 15 P. M. and the second recess is from 12.00 M to 
12.45 P. M. This gives one and a half hours for each 
class in manual training and cooking. 

The teachers all report that they like the plan. They 
say, "The pupils are getting up speed, they work harder, 
are more energetic and show less fatigue at the end of 
the day." One teacher added, "The children just love 
school, and some of them don't care for vacation." One 
of the new teachers said, "Last year my work seemed to 
drag. The last part of the day the children were listless 
and inattentive. I have none of this trouble in Lincoln." 
One primary teacher said "I find time enough for all the 
regular work but some days I should like ten minutes 
for extra work." 

As I go about the schools each week, I notice very 
little inattention, scarcely any fooling away of time. 
The children are all busy, studying or reciting. They 
are alert, interested in their work and eager to do their 
best. They are gaining good habits of study and the 



160 

ability to concentrate their minds on the work in hand. 
This is a great gain. 

The Special Teacher 

The special teacher continues to be a great success. 
The pupils, singly and in small groups, go to her daily for 
instruction and help. She shows them how to study, 
calls their attention to the most important points in the 
lesson, and tries to impress upon each child that these 
points must be thoroughly learned. She drills pupils 
on subjects in which they are especially deficient. In 
this way she is a great aid to the pupils and also to the 
regular teachers. Some backward children have caught 
up with their classes, while a few children with special 
ability and a desire to study have been able to skip a 
grade. I believe the special teacher is worth much 
more to our schools than her salary indicates. 

The Manual Training 

Mr. Brackett reports that the boys are doing much 
better work than ever before. In each class they are 
more earnest, and all desire to do a good piece of work. 
The various articles, which they have made, will bear 
close inspection. Many of these articles are constantly 
on exhibition, and we are always glad to have visitors 
examine them. Last spring one of the boys made a 
wireless telegraph instrument, which worked well, and 
received first prize at Framingham Fair for mechanical 
models showing skill. 

Cooking and Sewing 

Mrs. Smith writes, "Under the new schedule of work- 
ing hours the lessons in my department are going on 
systematically and with marked improvement, both in 
cooking and sewing. The children each year seem more 
ambitious and anxious to excel. 

"The work in the sewing classes begins with the younger 



161 

girls learning the stitches and the weaving of baskets. 
As skill is gained, useful articles of clothing are made, and 
the course ends in the eighth grade with the cutting and 
making of dresses. One aim, kept before the girls, is to 
use material which will simplify laundry work in the 
homes. One especially skilful girl in grade VI has 
finished the work of her grade, and is now making dresses 
for her baby sister. 

"The cooking is as popular as ever. Our object is 
always to teach the girls to make everyday foods, which 
are as nourishing and as economical as possible." 

The seventh and eighth grades have done much good 
work in canning fruits and making jellies, both for class 
use and for the homes. The eighth grade filled a large 
order for canned tomatoes. The money received for 
this work was put into cook books for the girls' homes, 
where we hope the girls will continue their good work. 

Some kind friends of the school have given the classes 
vegetables and fruits, which have enabled them to cook a 
large variety of dishes. Other friends furnished cocoa 
which the cooking classes served hot during the cold 
months to the pupils who bring their dinners. 

In March a luncheon was prepared by the girls in 
grade eight, and served to a company of mothers, who 
joined Mrs. Blodgett in responding to an invitation to 
test the school cooking. The following menu was served, 
and all were much pleased to find the girls able to prepare 
so good a lunch. 

MENU 
Bisque Soup Croutons 

Creamed Chicken 
Rissoto Baked Onions Riced Potato 

Cranberry Sauce Pickled Peaches 

Lettuce and Tomato Salad 
Rolls 
Pudding Candy 

Coffee 



162 
Home Gardens 

In their home gardens the children produced a good 
quantity and quality of vegetables, some of which were 
presented to the cooking classes. 

At the Framingham Fair the pupils exhibited the best 
products of their work in manual training, cooking, sew- 
ing and gardening in competitionwith many children 
from other Towns. They won prizes in all these depart- 
ments. We hope to send in a better exhibit next year. 

Attendance 

The attendance has been the best for a number of years, 
as the following table will show : — 

Average Average Percent of High 

Year Enrollment Membership Attendance Attendance School 

Attendance 



1907 


117 


103 


96 


92.7 


22 


1908 


115 


107 


96 


89.2 


23 


1909 


150 


139 


128 


92.6 


19 


1910 


141 


127 


117 


91.9 


20 


1911 


159 


147 


136 


92.4 


22 


1912 


159 


151 


142 


94.0 


32 



The two highest grades contain about twice as many 
pupils as they did the first year of my supervision. We 
have also a large number of pupils attending high schools. 
This would indicate that the Lincoln children are re- 
maining longer in school. 

In closing I wish to commend the teachers for their 
good work and hearty co-operation, and to thank the 
members of the committee, collectively and individually, 
for their continued support and confidence. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. S. LYMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



163 



ROLL OF HONOR 

The following pupils have been neither absent nor tardy 
for the time designated: — 



Holgar J. B. 
Alice Robus. 



For Two Years 

Jensen. Esther O. Cousins. 

Emily Robus. 



Evelyn M. Cousins. 
James Corrigan. 
Belva Gallent. 
Mildred Sims. 
Reynold Bowles. 



For One Year 

James Farrar. 
Robert Donaldson. 
Marjorie Doherty. 
Marie Connors. 
Richard Corrigan. 
Lyman Cousins. 



For Two Terms 



John H. Coane. 
J. Redman Hartwell, 
Warren A. Rice. 
Doris Farrar. 
Andrew Weir. 
Edna Wetherbee. 
Gladys Hamilton. 
Marion Rocks. 
Raymond Langille. 
Malcolm Donaldson. 
Bertha Chapin. 
Helena Sherman. 
Roy Sims. 
Arthur Butcher. 



Bertha V. Bowles. 
Kate A. Connors. 



Thomas T. Giles. 
W x m. C. Peirce, Jr. 
Ruth Farquhar. 
Kenneth Hamilton. 
Carl Nelson. 
Elizabeth Giles. 
Harriet Peirce. 
Eliazbeth Connors. 
Alden Farrar. 
Richard Nelson. 
Helen Pierce. 
Louisa Monella. 
Chester Bates. 
William Robus. 
Royden Berger. 

For One Term 

William S. Bowles. 
Ethel M. Cousins. 



164 



Ralph H. Bamforth. 
Edward F. Boyce. 
Leonard Crowley. 
Louis Cook. 
Edward Flint. 
Mildred Bates. 
Francis Corrigan. 
Allen Dougherty. 
Edward Rocks. 



Philip F. Bamforth, 
James Diamond. 
Grace Anderson. 
Mary Diamond. 
Rothwell MacRae. 
Lillian Rocks. 
Rosa Conteau. 
Harold Rocks. 
Marjorie Sadler. 
Edmund Giles. 



165 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Winter Term begins January 6, 1913, ends March 28; 
twelve weeks. 

Spring Term begins Arpil 7, ends June 13; ten weeks. 

Fall term begins September 2; ends December 19; 
sixteen weeks. 

Winter term begins January 5, 1914, ends March 27; 
twelve weeks. 

Spring term begins April 6, ends June 12. 

Recess from Wednesday before Thanksgiving to Mon- 
day following. 

Holidays: Washington's Birthday, Patriot's Day, 
Memorial Day, Columbus Day. 

Length of school year, 38 weeks. 



166 



STATISTICS FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1911-1912. 

Number of children in Town, September, 1912, 
between 5 and 15 years: boys, 95, girls 90; 

total 185 

Number of children in Town, September, 1911 191 
Number of children in Town, September, 1912, 

between 7 and 14 years: — boys, 75; girls, 72; 

total 147 

Enrollment for the year, ending June, 1912 . 159 

Number between 5 and 15 years of age . 157 

Number over 15 years of age 

Number between 7 and 14 years of age 

Number attending Concord High School 

Number attending Waltham High School 

Number of regular teachers employed 

Number of special teachers employed 

Number of teachers who have graduated from 

normal schools 

From Training School .... 

Illiterate minors in Town over 14 years of age . 

Total number registered in Lincoln schools 

during the year ending June, 1912 . . 164 

Number of pupils sent to High Schools from 

Lincoln 32 

Total number receiving instruction at Town 

expense • 



137 
20 
12 



196 



167 



•93b jo BJB9A* gx 


<N 


o 


o 


o 


o 


(M 


J9ao sjtctnjj 














•33b jo bUBaX ^ x pan 2, 


o 


00 


co 


o 


CO 


l> 


naa^naq ejidrijj 


CO 


CO 


TF 


r— ( 


, " H 


co 
1— 1 


'93b jo SIB9A" gx P aB 9 


03 


00 


00 


O 


OS 


1^ 


uaaM^aq sjidn^ 


CO 


CO 


^h 


(M 


T— 1 


1— i 




(M 


^f 


rH 


T^ 


^H 


o 


•eouspna^y 














jo -^aaojaj 


lO 


^h 


Tfl 


i—l 


^ 


T^ 




os 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 




iO 


CO 


iO 


<N 


CO 


1—1 


•aoaBpua^v 














93sj9Ay 


<N 


CO 


<N 


00 


10 


<M 


CO 


CO 


^ 


T— 1 


T-H 


^ 














T— 1 




<M 


<N 


(M 


O 


IO 


rH 


•diqeiaquiaj^ 














93BjaAV 


CO 


iO 

CO 


to 


o 
oq 


CO 


i— 1 


•siiif) — ;uaraj|0jua 


^ 


CO 


•*& 


00 


o 


OS 




rH 


(M 


c<\ 




T— 1 


t^ 


•SA"oa — ^uauiiiojua 


O 


iO 




r-i 


OS 


O 
00 


•jjoda^i amg 


^h 


00 


00 


O 


G5 


OS 


joj aaatajjojug 


CO 


CO 


^ 


<N 




1— 1 


ejidnj jo 
isii ^jB^uatu9[ddng 


T— 1 


1— 1 


- 


<M 


O 


iO 






T5 














1— 1 

w 


GO 




m 




CO 


g 
'ft 


T3 


+3 

a 


O 

o 




5^ 


« 




Eh' 


pq 


cu 

+3 








+3 

o 


a> 


-J-3 






?H 


fH 


'3 


c3 


a> 






C3 

o 


o 

p 




w 


a 






l*H 












CO 

•3 


1 


1 


i 

►"H 


1 


^ 

^ 

^ 


r — i 

•S 


CO 


£ 


g 


s 


§2 


i 


^ 


i»S 


f»~» 


r-«a 


l^~i 


r—o 






O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^ 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


"Ki 




.42 


ss 


g 


£ 


g 


9 




o 


■e* 


•<s> 


•<>> 


•<S> 


o 




CO 


^ 


^ 


^ 


H 


QQ 





168 



WARRANT. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at town meeting for 
the transaction of town affairs, to meet in Bemis Hall 
in said Lincoln, on Monday the 3rd day of March next, 
at 11.30 o'clock A. M. by posting a copy of this warrant 
by you attested, in each of the Post Offices and in some 
other public place in said Town, seven days at least before 
the said third day of March, then and there to act upon 
the following articles : 

ARTICLE 1. To choose, a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers; and any other officers required by law 
to be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees : 

Town Clerk for one year. 

Selectmen for one year. 

Overseers of the Poor for one year. 

Assessor for three years. 

Treasurer for one year. 



169 

Auditor or Auditors for one year. 

Collector of Taxes for one year. 

School Committee for three years. 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years. 

Tree Warden for one year. 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

Water Commissioner for three years. 

One or more Constables for one year. 

Board of Health Member for three years. 

Also to vote upon the following question: 

" Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon and may be 
closed at six o'clock P.M. 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February 1st, 
1913, in anticipation of the collection of taxes for the 
said year, such sums of money as may be necessary for 
the current expenses of the Town, but not exceeding 
the total tax levy for the said year, giving the notes of 
the Town in payment therefor payable in one year from 



170 

the date thereof. All debts incurred under authority 
of this vote shall be paid from taxes of the present 
municipal year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a committee 
on claims under the provisions of Section 3 Article 6 of the 
the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will appoint a committee 
to prosecute persons from selling intoxicating liquors 
in the town and appropriate money for the same. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will issue water bonds 
pursuant to the Acts of 1907, Chapter 476, and reim- 
burse the treasury on account of money paid from the 
treasury pending an issue of bonds on account of pay- 
ments for water construction purposes; also, issue bonds, 
as aforesaid on account of payment for water construc- 
tion purposes, which have been made from current in- 
come of the water works or take any other action with 
reference to the matter. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will accept provisions 
of Section 364, Chapter 560, of the Acts of the year 1907, 
or any other Act or Acts them thereto enabling and elect 
a Highway Surveyor for one year. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will, under the provi- 
sions of statute in such case made and provided, vote 
to adopt official ballots for the election of Town Officers 
required to be elected by ballot or otherwise and deter- 
mine the officers to be elected by official ballot and the 
terms of service of such officers. 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will purchase a new 
sprayer for use by the Tree Warden, as recommended in 
his report. 



171 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will purchase a stone 
crusher, to be located in the south part of the Town, as 
recommended in the report of the Superintendent of 
Streets. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will authorize or direct 
the Town Treasurer to pay the employees of the Town in 
cash at some special dates in each month and post a 
notice as to the date or dates in each month when such 
payment will be made; also, to fix the daily wage and 
length of day for Town employees. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the street 
lighting from the house of Edwin S. Bent to Mr. A. H. 
Higginson's avenue on the Concord road and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town will install three electric 
lights in the east part of the Town, one at the junction 
of Lexington road and Cambridge turnpike, opposite the 
house of Mr. James B. Wheeler, one at the junction of the 
Weston road and the Cambridge turnpike, and one at the 
junction of the Lexington road and Cambridge turnpike, 
opposite the Farrington Memorial, or take any action 
with reference to the matter or make any appropriation 
for the same. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will require peddlers 
and junk dealers to secure local licenses before doing 
business in the Town. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your doings 
thereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time for the 
meeting aforesaid. 



172 

Given under our hands this twentieth day of February 
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
thirteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
Selectmen of Lincoln, 



173 



By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Middlesex, ss. 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 
of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897, 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to wit: — 

"ARTICLE I. 

Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on 
the first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving a 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 
*own, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or at- 
tached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 



174 

ARTICLE II. 

Finances. 

Section 1. The financial year shall comment vnch the 
tirst day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the ac- 
count to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall be 
sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month, 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them th» 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer is 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 
approve in writing all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such appropriation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to rwhom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 



175 

shall be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
sums by law payable from the treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds, notes 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section 
Such drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be trans 
mitted by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accom- 
panied by the approved bills or other documents for the 
settlement of which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. 6. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap- 
proved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes scrip, and other 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. No draft shall be drawn by tne selectmen un- 
less there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except 
for sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, 
final judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the 
town and interest thereon, and money payable to the com 
missioners of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shaK 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
* countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they shall 
incur no further expenditure, except in cases where such 
expenditure may be required by law; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the in- 



176 

terval between the thirty-first day of January in each year 
and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
in order to meet the liabilities of their several dpartments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditure and liability incurred for any pur- 
pose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount appro- 
priated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise 
vote, no extension of water pipes shall be made unless be- 
fore the work of construction is begun one or more of the 
persons whom it is proposed to supply with water by means 
of such extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with 
sureties satisfactory to the water commissioners, condi- 
tioned to pay to the town for five years next following the 
completion of such extension and the letting of water into 
the same, a sum sufficient, together with the net annual in- 
come from such extension, to amount annually to five per 
centum of the total cost thereof. 



ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be: a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct: in 1754 as a Town;" in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall ; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln; 
in saltire two shepherd's crooks; the device thereof being as 
follows: 



177 



Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, 
given or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be 
sealed with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town 
by a majority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a boo! 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and othei 
instruments to which the town is a party except such in- 
struments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of 
Deeds; and it shall be the duty of any board or officer exe- 
cuting or receiving such written contract, or other instru- 
ment, to deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for 
the purpose of record. It shall be the duty of the town 
clerk to see that all conveyances of real estate to the town 
are properly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of <Jil town re- 
ports, reports of all committees chosen by the tow ^ and all 
original documents relating to the affairs of the tow. which 
may come into his possession. 

ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Section 1. Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet- 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



178 
ARTICLE VI. 

Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds $200.00. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may be expedient to do so, 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the pro- 
tection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose, a committee on claims, such committee 
shall have and exercise exclusively all the powers and 
duties conferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding 
sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the town seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town 
officers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devises, bequests and donations to the town daring the 



179 

preceding year; a list of all laws of the commonwealth ac- 
cepted by the town during the year; all by-laws adopted by 
the town since the preceding annual report; copies of the 
laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance of 
any highway or townway within the limits of the town dur- 
ing the preceding year; and a statement of all outstanding 
bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the payment 
of money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 
child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the 
town having no lawful occupation or business, not attend- 
ing school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children 
as persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations 
of the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be com- 
mitted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelms- 
ford, Mass., or to any other place provided by the town 
within its limits, for confinement, instruction, and disci- 
pline. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 



180 

after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having 
been requested by the owner or any occupant of the 
premises or by any constable or police officer to remove 
therefrom. 

Sect. 4. No person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. No person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or 
way, without proper authority to do so. 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
•ffense, a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, ap- 
proved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
pf record, I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



181 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers, 1912-1913 3-5 

Proceedings of Town Meetings, 1912-1913 7-48 

Town Clerk's Report 49-52 

Recommendations for Appropriations 54-55 

Selectmen's Report 54-65 

Auditor's Report 53 

Expenditures for the year 66-79 

Report of Assessors 103-118 

Report of Town Treasurer 88 

Report of Town Treasurer in account Cemetery Commissioners . 136 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund ..... 89 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds .... 90-98 

Report of Treasurer Geo. F. Bemis Lecture Fund . . . 99-100 

Report of Water Commissioners 119-133 

Report of Tree Warden 137-139 

Report of Board of Health 101-102 

Report of Supt. of Streets . 84-87 

Report of Inspector of Animals 80-82 

Report of Fire Engineers . 83 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library .... 140 

Library Statistics 142 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 141 

Report of Librarian 143 

List of Accessions to Library 144-150 

School Reports 151-167 

School Expenditures 155 

Report of School Committee 153-154 

School Calendar and Statistics . 165-166 

Roll of Honor 163-164 

Tabular Statement 167 

Warrant, 1913 168-172 

By-Laws of the Town 173-180 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From February 1, 1913, to February 1, 1914 

ALSO THE 

Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THE YEAR 1913-1914 




BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS. 

394 Atlantio Avenue 

1914 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



From February 1, 1913, to February 1, 1914 



ALSO THE 



Reports of the School and other Committees 



FOR THE YEAR 1913-1914 




BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS. 

394 Atlantic Avenue 

1914 



Town Officers, 1913-1914 



Town Clerk. 
GEORGE L. CHAPIN. 

Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor. 
CHARLES S. SMITH, JOHN F. FARRAR, 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON. 

Board of Health. 

R. D. DONALDSON Term expires 1915 

MARTIN M. WELCH " " 1916 

EDWARDS W. HERMAN " " 1914 



CHARLES S. WHEELER Term expires 1915 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE " " 1916 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN " " 1914 

Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Auditor. 
JAMES W. LENNON. 

Constable. 
JAMES T. LAIRD 

Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

CHARLES S. SMITH . . . . . . Term expires 1915 

C. LEE TODD " " 1916 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1914 



4 

Tree Warden. 
JOHN J. KELLIHER. 

Committee on Claims. 
MOORFIELD STOREY, JULIUS E. EVELETH, 

CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free Public Lectures. 

*GEORGE FLINT Term expires 1915 

C LEE TODD " " 1916 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1914 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER, GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH 

Trustees of Lincoln Library. 

CHARLES F ADAMS, JOHN F. FARRAR, 

CHARLES LEE TODD, 
CHARLES S. SMITH, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 

Registrars. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, JOHN F. FARRAR, 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON, GEORGE L. CHAPIN. 

School Committee. 

ELIZABETH BLODGETT Term expires 1915 

HENRY E. WARNER " '• 1914 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY " "■ 1916 

Water Commissioners. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN Term expires 1915 

JOSEPH S. HART " " 1916 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN " " 1914 

♦Deceased 



5 



Field Drivers. 

CHESTER H. SHERMAN, WILLIAM A. HARDING, 

EDWARD F. FLINT. 



Fence Viewers. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, WM. H. SHERMAN. 



Surveyors of Lumber. 
RICHARD A. SHEPARD. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 

SAMUEL FARRAR, HAROLD S. COUSINS, 

JOHN F. FARRAR. 

Cemetery Commissioners. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN Term expires 1915 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1916 

JOSEPH S. HART " " 1914 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Proceedings at the Annual Meeting, January 25, 1913 

WARRANT 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Saturday, 
January 25th next, at 8 o'clock P. M., to act on the 
following articles, viz. : 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To see if the Town will adopt Section 392 
of Chapter 560 of the Acts of the year 1907, or any 
amendments thereto, or any other act or acts relative 
to the use of official ballots in the election of officers 
at its Annual Town Meetings, or take any action with 
reference to the same. 

ART. 3. To see if the Town will take any measures 
in regard to the observance of its by-laws, or act any- 
thing in regard to the same. 



8 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by 
posting an attested copy thereof in each of the Post 
Offices and one of the churches or some other public 
place, seven days at least before the day appointed for 
such meeting, and to make seasonable return thereof 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this seventeenth day of January, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred 
and thirteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 

C. L. TODD, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows : 
This is to certify that I have posted an attested copy 
of this Warrant in each of the Post Offices and one in 
the Railroad Station this day, January 18, 1913. 

GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM, 

Constable of the Town of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Town Clerk, who read the 
Warrant. 

Under 

ARTICLE 1. Charles S. Wheeler chosen Mod- 
erator. (The check list was used. ) 

ART. 2. Voted, unanimously. That the Town 
does hereby authorize and adopt the use of an official 
ballot for the election of all Town Officers, required 
by law to be elected at an annual meeting, under 



9 

the provisions of Sections 392 and the following Sec- 
tions of Chapter 560 of the Acts of the Legislature 
for the year 1907, and of all other acts amendatory 
thereof, or supplemented thereto. 

Voted to adjourn. 

Attest : 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

Confirming the foregoing vote, the following letter 
was sent to the Secretary of the Commonwealth. 

Lincoln, Mass., Jan. 30, 1913. 
To the Secretary of the Commonwealth: 

Dear Sir: 

I desire to notify you that at a meeting of the qualified 
voters of the Town of Lincoln, duly called and held on 
Saturday, Jan. 25, 1913, under Art. 2 of the Warrant, 
which was as follows: 

"To see if the Town will accept Section 392 of 
Chapter 560 of the Acts of the year 1907, or any 
amendments thereto, or any other act or acts relative 
to the use of official ballots in the election of officers 
at its Annual Meetings, or take any action with ref- 
erence to the same." 

It was voted, That the Town does hereby authorize 
and accept the use of an official ballot for the election 
of all Town Officers required by law to be elected at 
an annual meeting, under the provisions of Section 
392 and the following Sections of Chapter 560 of the 
[I Acts of the Legislature for the year 1907 and of all 
'' other acts amendatory thereof or supplemented thereby. 

Respectfully, 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



10 



Proceedings of the Annual Town Meeting held 
March 3, 1913. 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at town meeting for 
the transaction of town affairs, to meet in Bemis Hall 
in said Lincoln, on Monday the 3rd day of March next, 
at 11.30 o'clock A. M. by posting a copy of this warrant 
by you attested, in each of the Post Offices and in some 
other public place in said Town, seven days at least before 
the said third day of March, then and there to act upon 
the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose, a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers; and any other officers required by law 
to be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees : 

Town Clerk for one year. 

Selectmen for one year. 



11 

Overseers of the Poor for one year. 

Assessor for three years. 

Treasurer for one year. 

Auditor or Auditors for one year. 

Collector of Taxes for one year. 

School Committee for three years. 

Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years. 

Tree Warden for one year. 

Cemetery Commissioner for three years. 

Water Commissioner for three years. 

One or more Constables for one year. 

Board of Health Member for three years. 

Also to vote upon the following question: 

"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon and may be 
closed at six o'clock P.M. 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February 1st, 
1913, in anticipation of the collection of taxes for the 
said year, such sums of money as may be necessary for 



12 

the current expenses of the Town, but not exceeding 
the total tax levy for the said year, giving the notes ol 
the Town in payment therefor payable in one year frorc 
the date thereof. All debts incurred under authority 
of this vote shall be paid from taxes of the present 
municipal year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a committee 
on claims under the provisions of Section 3 Article 6 of the 
By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will appoint a committee 
to prosecute persons for selling intoxicating liquors i 
in the town and appropriate money for the same. 






ART. 10. To see if the Town will issue water bonds 
pursuant to the Acts of 1907, Chapter 476, and reim- 
burse the treasury on account of money paid from the 
treasury pending an issue of bonds on account of pay- 
ments for water construction purposes ; also, issue bonds, 
as aforesaid on account of payment for water construc- 
tion purposes, which have been made from current in- 
come of the water works or take any other action with 
reference to the matter. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will accept provisions 
of Section 364, Chapter 560, of the Acts of the year 1907, 
or any other Act or Acts them thereto enabling and elect 
a Highway Surveyor for one year. 

ART. 12. To see if the Town will, under the provi- 
sions of statute in such case made and provided, vote 
to adopt official ballots for the election of Town Officers 
required to be elected by ballot or otherwise and deter- 
mine the officers to be elected by official ballot and the 
terms of service of such officers. 



13 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will purchase a new 
sprayer for use by the Tree Warden, as recommended in 
jhis report. 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will purchase a stone 
crusher, to be located in the south part of the Town, as 
recommended in the report of the Superintendent of 
Streets. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will authorize or direct 
the Town Treasurer to pay the employees of the Town in 
cash at some special dates in each month and post a 
notice as to the date or dates in each month when such 
payment will be made; also, to fix the daily wage and 
length of day for Town employees. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the street 
lighting from the house of the Misses Bent to Mr. A. H. 
Higginson's Avenue on the Concord road and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town will install three electric 
lights in the east part of the Town, one at the junction 
of Lexington road and Cambridge turnpike, opposite the 
house of Mr. James B. Wheeler, one at the junction of the 
Weston road and the Cambridge turnpike, and one at the 
junction of the Lexington road and Cambridge turnpike, 
ppposite the Farrington Memorial, or take any action 
fvith reference to the matter or make any appropriation 
for the same. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will require peddlers 
ind junk dealers to secure local licenses before doing 
business in the Town. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your doings 
^hereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time for the 
neeting aforesaid. 



14 

Given under our hands this twentieth day of February 
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
thirteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

Lincoln, Feb. 24, 1913. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy, one in each of the Post Offices and one in the 
Railroad Station, seven days before said meeting 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, Feb. 24, 1913. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy, one in each of the Post Offices and one in the 
Railroad Station, seven days before said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Town Clerk, who read the 
Warrant. 

Under 

ARTICLE 1. Voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. (The check list was used. ) 

Immediately after the choice of Moderator, the 
following vote was passed. 

Voted, unanimously, That this meeting adjourn 
at six o'clock this afternoon, and that it then ad- 
journ to Saturday next, March 8, 1913, at 12.30 o'clock 
in the afternoon; that until such adjournment the 



15 

polls shall remain open for the purpose of receiving 
votes on the official ballot; and that in the mean time, 
no further business shall be done. 

A motion was then made to reconsider the above 
vote, which motion was lost. 

Voted, To hold the election in the Town Hall. 

Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar were sworn 
as Tellers, and J. Malcolm Eveleth and Hermon T. 
Wheeler as Ballot Clerks. 

The official ballots were delivered by the Town Clerk 
to the Ballot Clerks, and a receipt for the same taken. 

The polls were opened after the ballot box had been 
examined, and locked, and the keys delivered to Winslow 
A. Eaton, the Constable in charge. The counter on 
the ballot box showed 0. 

The ballot box was not opened until the polls closed 
at 6 o'clock, when the counter showed 237 or one more 
than the ballot disclosed. The check lists used by 
the Ballot Clerks showed that the names of 213 male 
and 23 female voters were checked, and this number 
corresponded with the number of ballots cast. 

After the Tellers had completed their work, the 
Moderator announced the vote. 

The check lists used and the ballots cast were signed 
and sealed according to law, and the Moderator then 
declared the meeting adjourned until Saturday, March 
8, at 12.30 o'clock. 

Petitions for a recount of the ballots for Selectmen 
and Constable were filed with the Town Clerk, and a 
recount of these votes was made at 9 o'clock A. M., 
March 8, 1913. 

The following is the vote as declared by at the open- 
ing of the meeting March 8, 1913: 



16 



Town Clerk- 
George L. Chapin, sworn, 
W. C. Peirce, 
Blank, 

Selectmen. — 

Robert D. Donaldson, sworn, 
David Farquhar, 
John F. Farrar, sworn, 
Joseph S. Hart, 
Charles S. Smith, sworn, 
Charles Lee Todd, 

Assessor for 3 years. — 
William C. Peirce, sworn, 
Blank, 

Treasurer. — 

Roderick B. Laird, 
Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 
Blank, 

Collector of Taxes. — 

Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 
Blank, 

Auditor. — 

James W. Lennon, sworn, 
Blank, 

Constable. — 

George E. Cunningham — 
James T. Laird, sworn, 
Winslow A. Eaton, 
Blank, 



155 votes. 


1 


vote. 


57 votes. 


114 


votes. 


78 




109 




101 




106 




83 




184 


votes. 


29 


a 


76 


votes. 


130 


tt 


7 


a 


187 


votes. 


26 


a 


189 


votes. 


24 


a 


97 


votes. 


104 


(t 


1 


vote. 


11 


votes. 



17 



School Committee, 3 years. — 




Anthony J. Doherty, 


124 votes. 


Edward R. Farrar, 


94 " 


Blank, 


18 " 


Water Commissioner, 3 years. — 




Joseph S. Hart, 


160 votes. 


James E. Baker, 


13 " 


Hermon T. Wheeler, 


8 " 


Blank, 


32 " 


Board of Health, 3 years. — 




Warren K. Blodgett, 2nd, 


70 votes. 


Fritz Cunnert, 


24 " 


Roger Sherman, 


16 " 


Martin M. Welch, 


80 " 


Blank, 


13 " 


Tree Warden. — 




John J. Kelliher, 


189 votes 


Edward R. Farrar, 


2 " 


M. Connors, 


1 vote. 


Blank, 


21 votes. 


Cemetery Commissioners, 3 years. — 




Julius E. Eveleth, 


179 votes. 


Blank, 


34 " 


Commissioner of Trust Funds, 3 years — 




C. Lee Todd, 


35 votes. 


Scattering, 


11 " 


Blank, 


167 " 



18 

Upon the question, "Shall licenses be granted for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors in this Town?" 

Yes, 27 votes. 

No, 150 " 

Blank, 36 " 

Immediately upon the announcement of the votes at 
the adjourned meeting, the Town Clerk and the 
Selectmen were sworn by the Moderator. The other 
officers elected on the official ballot who were required, 
to be sworn, were sworn by the Town Clerk. 

The following officers were elected under Art. 2. 

Trustee of Bemis Lectureship, 3 years. — 
C. Lee Todd. 

Field Drivers. Voted to choose three. — 
Chester H. Sherman. 
William A. Harding. 
Edward F. Flint, sworn. 

Fence Viewers. — 
John F. Farrar. 
William H. Sherman. 

Surveyor of Lumber. — 

Richard A. Shepard, sworn. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. — 
John F. Farrar, sworn. 
Samuel Farrar, sworn. 
Harold S. Cousins. 

ART. 3. After some discussion all of the printed 
reports were accepted. 



19 

The following report of the Committee on Claims 
was accepted: 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS. 

The Committee on Claims submit the following 
report: 

The case of Francis Smith vs. Inhabitants of Lincoln, 
a suit to recover damages for taking about one fourth 
of an acre of land to enlarge the engine house lot was 
tried and a verdict of damages for $250.00 and interest 
from the time of taking was rendered by the jury, the 
total amounting to $594.44, which has been paid. At 
the time of the trial it was discovered, that since the 
taking, the land had been conveyed by deed, back to 
Francis Smith, and this was corrected so that the Town 
is now in possession of the land and buildings at the 
pond. 

The case of Francis Smith vs. the Inhabitants of 
Lincoln for damages for taking land for widening the 
Trapelo Road has been settled for the sum of $200.00, 
which has been paid. 

The Committee on Claims were instructed by vote 
of the Town to register the land connected with the 
schoolhouse lot in the center of the Town. Under this 
vote a petition for registration was filed and a hearing 
is now in progress. 

Respectfully submitted by, 

MOORFIELD STOREY, 
JULIUS E. EVELETH, 
CHARLES S. WHEELER, 

Committee on Claims, 



20 

ART. 4. The following appropriations were made: 

Schools $11,000.00 

Support of Poor 500.00 

Highways and Bridges 10,000.00 

Library— The. Dog Tax and . . . . . 500.00 

Interest 500.00 

Cemeteries, Income of Cemetery Fund and . 300.00 

Board of Health 200.00 

Tree Warden 500.00 

Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth Work . . 2,000.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 4,500.00 

Payment of Water Bonds — From Water 

Works' Treasury 2,000.00 

Sinking Fund— From Water Works' Treasury 2, 173.37 

Hydrant and other Public Water Service . 2,400.00 

Waltham Hospital . . . ■ . . . 250.00 

Street Lamps 1,300.00 

Fire Department 100.00 

Payment Schoolhouse Bonds .... 3,000.00 

Payment, Interest on Schoolhouse Bonds 1,600.00 

Voted, That $10,000 of available money for the 
Town Treasury be appropriated for the purpose of 
liquidating the debt of the Town on account of the 
new schoolhouse, the bonds to be purchased or a sink- 
ing fund established, at the discretion of the Commis- 
sioners of Sinking and Trust Funds. 

ART. 5. Voted, That the taxes be collected in 
the same manner as heretofore. 

ART. 6. Voted, That the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes be \ X A% of the amount collected. 

ART. 7. Voted, That the Town Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is author- 
ized to borrow money from time to time, in anticipa- 



21 

tion of the taxes of the municipal year, beginning 
Feb. 1, 1913, to an amount not exceeding the total 
levy for the said year, and to issue note or notes there- 
for, payable within one year. Any debt or debts 
incurred under this vote to be paid from taxes of the 
said municipal year. 

ART. 8. Voted, To choose a Committee on Claims. 

Voted and chose, Moorfield Storey, Julius E. Eveleth, 
Charles S. Wheeler, Committee on Claims. 

ART. 9. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 10. Voted, That the Town Treasurer be 
authorized and directed to issue the Bonds of the 
Town for the sum of six thousand dollars ($6,000.00). 
Each bond to be for $500, to bear interest at a rate 
not exceeding 4% per annum to be dated June 1, 1913, 
and payable one on the first of June in each of the next 
twelve years, for the purpose of paying the expenses 
of extensions of the Water System of the Town. Such 
bonds to be signed by the Treasurer and counter- 
signed by the Selectmen, and to be denominated 
Lincoln Water Bonds. 

ARTS. 11 and 12. Voted, That a committee of five 
persons, consisting of the Selectmen and two others 
to be appointed by the Chair, examine into the subject 
matter of these Articles, and report their recommenda- 
tions at a future meeting. 

The Chair appointed E. Irving Smith and Anthony 
J. Doherty. 

ART. 13. Voted, That the old sprayer be sold, and 
a new one purchased and the sum of $600 and the 
proceeds of the sale of the old sprayer be appropriated. 



22 
ART. 14.. Voted, To pass over. 

ART. 15. Voted, That it is the opinion of this 
meeting that the Town Treasurer should pay the 
employees of the Town in cash, and that he specify 
the time when such payments will be made and give 
notice to such employees of the time specified. 

Voted, That it is the sense of this meeting that the 
laborers on the highways be paid at the rate of $2.25 
per day of nine hours. 

ART. 16. Voted, That the Town cause the electric 
street lights to be installed from Blodgett's Corner to 
A. H. Higginson's Avenue and the money to pay for 
the same be taken from money in the Treasury. 

ART. 17. Not acted upon. 

ART. 18. Voted, That the Town require junk 
dealers and peddlers to secure a local license before 
doing any business in this Town. 

On motion of Charles S. Smith, by unanimous 
consent of the Town, the following resolutions were 
unanimously adopted. 

Resolved, That the Town hereby expresses its desire 
that the New England Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
locate its central station on the lot west of the school- 
house, on the station road, if such action is not incon- 
sistent with the objects and purposes of the Company; 
and the Clerk transmit a copy of this resolution to the 
Company. 

Voted to adjourn. 

A copy of the above vote was sent to the General 

Manager, Mr. F. A. Houston, March 10, 1913. 

Attest: 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



23 

March 5, 1913. Winslow A. Eaton sworn as Special 
Police. 

March 17, 1913. John F. Farrar sworn as Special 
Police. 

March 19, 1913. Frank H. Cunningham, sworn as 
Special Police. 

March 20, 1913. Matthew H. Doherty, sworn as 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

March 21, 1913. Walter H. Sherman sworn as 
Special Police. 

March 26, 1913. John J. Kelliher sworn as Forest 
Warden. 

Martin M. Welch sworn as Inspector of Animals. 

April 2, 1913. John J. Kelliher sworn as Special 
Police. 

April 17, 1913. E. E. Reed sworn as Special Police. 

April 23, 1913. F. E. Hawkes sworn as Special 
Police. 

All of the above appointed officers were sworn by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

May 8, 1913. William H. Sherman was this day 
sworn as Superintendent of Streets. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



24 



List of Jurors for the year 1913, as prepared by the 
Selectmen : 



Charles H. Bamforth, 
Warren K. Blodgett, 
J. Elliot Bryant, 
James T. Calkins, 
Clarence G. Clapp, 
Charles E. Clark, 
Frank H. Cunningham, 
Thomas J. Dee, 
Charles P. Farnsworth, 
Edward R. Farrar, 
John F. Farrar, 
Thomas L. Giles, 
Mason P. Hunter, 
Robert Hunter, 
Charles E. Nelson, 
William H. Sherman, 
T. Wilbur Smith, 
Howard Snelling, 
C. Edgar Wheeler, 
Charles S. Wheeler, 
Hermon T. Wheeler, 



South Lincoln, R. F. D. 

South Lincoln, R. F. D. 

Waltham, R. F. D. 

South Lincoln, R. F. D. 

Lincoln. 

Lincoln. 

Concord, R. F. D. 

Concord, R. F. D. 

South Lincoln. 

South Lincoln. 

South Lincoln. 

South Lincoln. 

Waltham, R. F. D. 

South Lincoln. 

Lexington, R. F. D. 

South Lincoln. 

Lincoln. 

South Lincoln. 

South Lincoln, R. F. D. 

Lincoln. 

Lexington, R. F. D. 



C. S. SMITH, 

R. D. DONALDSON, 

JOHN F. FARRAR, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



A true copy. 
Attest : 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



Lincoln, Aug. 2, 1913. 



25 



» 



WARRANT 

Proceedings at the State Primary. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said 
Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in 
Bemis Hall, Tuesday September 23, 1913, at 7 o'clock 
P. M., for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for 
the nomination of candidates of political parties for 
the following officers: 

Governor, for this Commonwealth. 

Lieutenant-Governor, for this Commonwealth. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Treasurer and Receiver General, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Auditor of the Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Attorney-General, for this Commonwealth. 

Councillor, for Sixth Councillor District. 

Senator, for Fifth Middlesex Senatorial District. 



One Representative in General Court, for Thirteenth 
Middlesex Representative District. 

County Commissioner, for Middlesex County. 

Two Associate Commissioners, for Middlesex County. 

District Attorney, for Northern District. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency, for Middlesex 
County. 

And for the election of the following officers: 

District Member of State Committee for each polit- 
ical party for the Fifth Senatorial District. 

Three members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

Three members of the Republican Town Committee. 

Three members of the Progressive Party Town 
Committee. 

Delegates to State Conventions of Political Parties. 

All the above candidates and officers are to be voted 
for upon one ballot. 

The polls will be open from 7 P. M. to 9 P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by vote of the Town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 11th day of September, 
A. D. 1913. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

Eleventh day of Sept., 1913. 
*In Middlesex County, Southern District, REGISTER 
OF DEEDS (to fill vacancy). 



27 



The return on the Warrant is as follows : 

Lincoln, Sept. 15, 1913. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and in the Railroad 
Station seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by Robert D. Donaldson, one of the 
Selectmen. The Warrant was read by him, and the 
following officers were sworn by the Town Clerk. 

Hermon T. Wheeler and James W. Lennon as Ballot 
Clerks, and Thomas L. Giles, Herbert G. Farrar and 
Sumner Smith as Tellers. 

The counters of the ballot box and the interior of 
the box were opened and examined, then locked and 
the keys given to the Constable. The ballot box was 
not opened until the polls had been declared closed. 
The counter showed 62 at the close, but upon opening 
the box only 61 votes were found, and this number 
corresponded with the check lists. 

After the closing of the polls, the ballots were sorted 
and the counting proceeded as usual. The Republican 
votes were counted first. 

The following is the complete list of candidates as 
declared in open meeting by the presiding officer. 

REPUBLICAN. Total vote 27. 

FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Everett C. Benton of Belmont, 8 votes. 

Augustus P. Gardner of Hamilton, 15 " 

Blank, 4 " 



28 



FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 
Augustus H. Goetting of Springfield, 
Blank, 

FOR SECRETARY.. 

William S. Kinney of Boston, 
Blank, 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston, 
Maurice Kane of Whitman, 
Blank, 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

John E. White of Tisbury, 
Blank, 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 

James M. Swift of Fall River, 
Blank, 



19 votes. 




4 " 




21 votes. 




6 " 




15 votes. 




3 " 




9 " 




20 votes. 




7 " 




21 votes. 





FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District.- 
G. Frederick Simpson of Newton, 
Blank, 



20 votes. 

7 " 



FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District- 
John M. Gibbs of Waltham, 21 votes. 
Blank, 6 " 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 

Immanuel Pfeiffer, Jr., of Bedford, 17 votes. 

Joseph S. Hart of Lincoln, 1 vote. 

Blank, 9 votes. 



29 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.— 

Erson B. Barlow of Lowell, 6 votes 

Frederic P. Barnes of Newton, 5 

George H. Jennings of Cambridge, 2 

Frank A. Patch of Littleton, 7 

Joshua Wilson of Cambridge, 2 

Blank, 5 

FOR ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONER.— 

Blank, 27 votes. 

FOR DISTRICT ATTORNEY, Northern District.— 
John J. Higgins of Somerville, 19 votes. 

Blank, 8 " 

FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOL- 
VENCY.— 

William E. Rogers of Wakefield, 20 votes. 

Blank, 7 



u 



FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS, South Middlesex.— 
(To fill vacancy. ) 
Thomas Leighton, Jr., of Cambridge, 16 votes. 

Blank, 11 " 

FOR STATE COMMITTEE, Fifth Middlesex District. 
Adelbert B. Messer of Concord, 16 votes. 

Blank, 11 " 

FOR DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.- 
John F. Farrar, 15 votes. 

Scattering, 2 " 

Blank, 10 " 



30 



TOWN COMMITTEE.— 
Chester H. Sherman, 
H. E. Warner, 
Charles S. Smith, 
Scattering, 
Blank, 



7 votes 


5 


it 


7 


(( 


6 


a 


c 


ii 



DEMOCRATIC. Total vote 8. 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 
James J. Storrow of Lincoln, 
Blank, 



5 votes. 

1 vote. 

2 votes. 



FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR. 
Edward P. Barry of Boston, 
Richard H. Long of Framingham, 
Blank, 



2 votes. 
4 " 
2 " 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Frank J. Donahue of Boston, 
Blank, 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Frederick W. Mansfield of Boston, 
Joseph L. P. St. Coeur of Cambridge, 
Blank, 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Frank H. Pope of Leominster, 



6 votes 
2 " 



3 votes. 

4 " 

1 vote. 



8 votes. 



FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 
Thomas J. Boynton of Everett, 



8 votes. 



FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 
John J. Hogan of Lowell, 



8 votes. 



31 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Charles F. McCarthy of Marlborough, 8 votes. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 

James William Byron of Concord, 6 votes. 

Joseph S. Hart of Lincoln, > 1 vote. 

Blank, 1 " 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.— 

John B. McCloskey of Cambridge, 2 votes. 

William H. Walsh of Framingham, 4 " 

Blank, . 2 " 

FOR ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONER.— 

M. M. Welch of Lincoln, 1 vote. 

Patrick F. Corrigan of Lincoln, 1 " 

Blank, 6 votes. 

FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOL- 
VENCY.— 

James F. Barrett of Cambridge, 8 votes. 

FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS.— 

J. Frank Facey of Cambridge, 8 votes. 

FOR STATE COMMISSIONER, Fifth Middlesex 
District. — 

Bernard W. Stanley of Waltham, 7 votes. 

Blank, 1 vote. 

FOR DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

Anthony J. Doherty of Lincoln, 7 votes. 

Blank, 1 vote. 



TOWN COMMITTEE.- 
M. M. Welch, 
A. J. Doherty, 
C. L. Todd, 
Scattering, 



2 votes. 

3 " 
2 " 
2 " 



PROGRESSIVE PARTY. Total vote 26. 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Charles Sumner Bird of Walpole, 
Blank, 

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.- 

Daniel Cosgrove of Lowell, 
Blank, 

FOR SECRETARY.— 

Russell A. Wood of Cambridge, 
Blank, 

FOR TREASURER.— 

Warren R. Keith of Brockton, 
Blank, 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Octave A. LaRiviere of Springfield, 
Blank, 

FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 
H. Huestis Newton of Everett, 
Blank, 

FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth DistricL- 
Harrie C. Hunter of Marlborough, 
Blank, 



14 votes. 


12 


(C 


14 


votes. 


12 


a 


12 


votes. 


14 


it 


12 


votes. 


14 


(t 


12 


votes. 


14 


n 


12 


votes. 


14 


(t 


11 


votes. 


15 


tt 



. 



33 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District- 
Frederick P. Glazier of Hudson, 3 votes. 
Blank, 23 " 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 
Joseph S. Hart of Lincoln, 25 votes. 

Blank, 1 vote. 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.— 
Charles H. Mclntire of Lowell, 9 votes. 

Charles W. Atkins of Everett, 1 vote. 

Blank, 16 votes. 

FOR ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONER.— 

Albert F. Parker of Pepperell, 3 votes. 

Charles W. Atkins of Everett, 2 " 

Blank, 23 



tt 



FOR DISTRICT ATTORNEY, Northern District.— 
Philip M. Clark of Cambridge, 9 votes. 

Blank, 17 



n 



FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOL- 
VENCY.— 
Blank, 26 votes. 



FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS.— 
Albin M. Richards of Cambridge^ 
Blank, 



STATE COMMITTEE.— 
R. B. Laird of Lincoln, 
Joseph S. Hart of Lincoln, 
Blank, 



9 
17 


votes 
a 


1 vote. 
1 " 
24 votes. 



34 



DELEGATES TO STATE CONVENTION.- 
Roderick B. Laird of Lincoln, 13 votes. 

Edwin S. Blodgett of Lincoln, 13 " 

Wallace M. Brooks of Lincoln, 12 " 



TOWN COMMITTEE.- 
Joseph S. Hart, 
Edwin S. Blodgett, 
Roderick B. Laird, 



17 votes. 
15 " 
14 " 



Voted to dissolve the meeting. 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Toivn Clerk. 



37 



Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar were sworn 
as Tellers, and James W. Lennon and Hermon T. 
Wheeler as Ballot Clerks. 

The ballot box was opened and examined, the counter 
showing 0. It was then locked and the keys given 
to the Constable. 

The polls were closed at 4 o'clock P. M., with the 
counter on the ballot box showing 189. One hundred 
and eighty-nine ballots were cast as follows: — ■ 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Charles Sumner Bird of Walpole, 
Eugene N. Foss of Boston, 
Augustus P. Gardner of Hamilton, 
David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 
George H. Wrenn of Springfield, 
Blank, 

FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR. 
Edward P. Barry of Boston, 
David Cosgrove of Lowell, 
August H. Goetting of Springfield, 
Albert J. Orem of Sharon, 
Peter O'Rourke of Medford, 
George E. Roewer, Jr., of Boston, 
Blank, 

FOR SECRETARY.— 

Frank J. Donahue of Boston, 
William S. Kinney of Boston, 
John A. Nicholls of Boston, 
Fred E. Belcher of Peabody, 
Ella M. Roberts of Springfield, 
Russell A. Wood of Cambridge, 
Blank, 



54 


votes 


14 


a 


63 


a 


54 


a 


1 


vote. 


3 


votes 


49 


votes 


46 


a 


81 


u 


2 


a 


1 


vote. 


1 


a 


9 


votes. 


52 


votes. 


77 


a 


3 


it 


1 


it 


1 


vote. 


40 


votes. 


15 


a 



38 



FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston, 
Charles E. Fenner of Worcester, 
Thomas A. Frissell of Hinsdale, 
Warren R. Keith of Brockton 
Frederick W. Mansfield of Boston, 
Blank, 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Herbert S. Brown of Greenfield, 

David Craig of Milford, 

Octave A. LaRiviere of Springfield, 

Samuel P. Levenberg of Boston, 

Frank H. Pope of Leominster, 

John E. White of Tisbury, 

Blank, 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.— 

Thomas J. Boynton of Everett, 
Freeman T. Crommett of Chelsea, 
John McCarty of Abington, 
H. Huestis Newton of Everett, 
Ingvor Paulsen of Boston, 
James M. Swift of Fall River, 
Blank, 

FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 
John J. Hogan of Lowell, 
Harrie C. Hunter of Marlborough, 
G. Frederick Simpson of Newton, 
Blank, 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District. 
John M. Gibbs of Waltham, 
Frederick P. Glazier of Hudson, 
Charles F. McCarthy of Marlborough, 
Blank, 



79 


votes 


3 


cc 


1 


vote. 


42 


votes 


43 


cc 


17 


cc 


1 


vote. 


2 


votes 


37 


a 


1 


vote. 


49 


votes 


77 


u 


22 


a 


47 


votes 


2 


cc 


3 


cc 


40 


cc 


1 


vote. 


74 votes 


22 


cc 


50 votes 


49 


cc 


71 


cc 


9 


cc 


77 votes 


38 


cc 


57, 


cc 


17 


cc 



39 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 
James William Byron of Concord, 25 votes. 

Joseph S. Hart of Lincoln, 117 " 

Immanuel Pfeiffer, Jr., of Bedford, 38 " 

Blank, 9 " 



FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, 

County. — 
Erson B. Barlow of Lowell, 
John B. McCluskey of Cambridge, 
Charles H. Mclntire of Lowell, 
Blank, 

FOR ASSOCIATE COMMISSIONERS, 

County. — 
Charles W. Atkins of Everett, 
Frederic P. Barnes of Newton, 
John J. Butler of Wakefield, 
George W. Enwright of Lowell, 
Edwin P. Fitzgerald of Somerville, 
Albert F. Parker of Pepperell, 
Blank, 



Middlesex 


72 


votes. 


45 


tt 


51 


u 


21 

71 /f ' 


tt 

7 77 


Mil 
31 


ialesex 
votes. 


69 


tt 


39 


a 


29 


(( 


43 


(I 


38 


tt 


3 


(( 



FOR DISTRICT ATTORNEY, Northern District— 
Philip M. Clark of Cambridge, 49 votes. 

William J. Corcoran of Cambridge, 45 " 

John J. Higgins of Somerville, 76 " 

Blank, 19 " 



FOR REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOL- 
VENCY.— 

James J. Barrett of Cambridge, 46 votes. 

William E. Roger of Wakefield, 110 " 

Blank, 33 " 



40 

FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS, Middlesex Southern 
District. — 

(To fill vacancy. ) 

J. Frank Facey of Cambridge, 43 votes. 

Thomas Leighton, Jr., of Cambridge, 83 " 

Albin M. Richards of Cambridge, 38 " 

Blank, . 25 " 

Shall the proposed amendment to the Constitution, 
making women eligible to appointment as notaries 
public be approved and ratified? 

Yes, 58 votes. 

No, 53 " 

Blank, 78 " 

Shall the proposed amendment to the Constitution 
authorizing the referendum be approved and ratified? 
Yes, 58 votes. 

No, 30 " 

Blank, 101 " 

Shall Chapter 807 of the Acts of 1913, being an act 
to provide for compensating laborers, workmen and 
mechanics for injuries sustained in public employment, 
and to exempt from legal liability counties and muni- 
cipal corporations which pay such compensation, be 
accepted by the inhabitants of this county? 

Yes, 68 votes. 

No, 30 " 

Blank, 91 " 

The ballot was declared by the presiding officer. 

The ballots were sealed in blocks of 50, as counted 
and with the check list were sealed in the box provided 
for the same. 

After which, the meeting was dissolved. 

Attest : 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



41 



Vote of the Thirteeth Middlesex District for Repre- 
sentative in the General Court as determined at the 
Town Clerk's Meeting, held at Concord, Nov. 14, 1913. 





Bed. 


Con. 


Lin. 


Sud. 


Way. 


West. 


Total 


James William 
















Byron of 
















Concord, 


28 


307 


25 


27 


113 


32 


532 


Joseph S. Hart 
















of Lincoln, 


71 


234 


117 


52 


112 


116 


702 


I mmanuel 
















Pfeiffer, Jr., 
















of Bedford 


123 


339 


38 


78 


163 


181 


922 


Blank, 


19 


41 


9 


8 


34 


19 


130 




241 


921 


189 


165 


422 


348 


2,286 



Two certificates of election were filled out for 
Immanuel Pfeiffer, Jr., of Bedford and signed by 
Abbott R. Webber, Town Clerk of Bedford. 
William D. Cross, Town Clerk of Concord. 
George L. Chapin, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Daniel Brackett, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
George W. Cutting, Town Clerk of Weston. 
Frank F. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 
Attest : 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

A recount of the ballots cast for County Commissioner 
was held Nov. 10, 1913, upon request of ten voters, but 
no changes were made in the vote as declared at the 
election November 4. 

The ballots were returned to the box in which they 
are kept, and the box was again sealed. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



42 



Proceedings of a Town Meeting held Nov. 26, 1913* 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

■ 

To James T. Laird, or any other Constable of the Town 
of Lincoln, in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabi- 
tants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to vote in 
Town affairs, to assemble in Bemis Hall, on Wednesday, 
November 26th, at 7.30 o'clock P. M., to act on the 
following Articles, viz. : 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To hear and act on the Report of the 
Committee appointed at the last March meeting to 
consider Articles 11 and 12 of the Warrant of that 
meeting, and report recommendations in connection 
with same, or take any other action the Town sees fit 
in relation to said Articles. 

ART. 3. To see if the Town will accept provisions 
of Section 364, Chapter 560, of the Acts of the year 
1907, or any other act or acts them thereto enabling 
and elect a Highway Surveyor for one year. 






43 

ART. 4. To see if the Town will appropriate the 
sum of $1,500.00, or any other sum, for further work 
on the highways during the present year. 

ART. 5. To see if the Town will instruct the Com- 
mittee on Claims with reference to any suits to which 
the Town is a party, or take any action in connection 
with the matter. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by post- 
ing an attested copy thereof in each of the Post Offices 
and one of the churches or some other public place 
seven days at least before the day appointed for such 
meeting, and to make seasonable return thereof, with 
your doings thereon, to the Town Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Dated at Lincoln, this eighteenth day of November 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand nine hundred 
and thirteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, Nov. 19, 1913. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Station seven days before date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable of Lincoln. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order by the Town Clerk, who read the 
Warrant. 

Under 



44 

ARTICLE 1. Voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. (The check list was used. ) 

ART. 2. The report of the Committee chosen at 
the annual meeting was read by Mr. Charles S. Smith, 
the Chairman, which report is as follows: — 

The Committee recommend that the Town adopt 
the Australian ballot, and accept the provision of 
Section 432 and 433 of Chapter 835 of the Acts of 1913. 
They also recommend that the polls be open on the 
first Monday in March of each year from 12 o'clock 
noon to 6 o'clock P. M., and that when said meeting 
adjourns for the transaction of the regular business of 
the Town, it adjourn to the following Monday at 1 
o'clock P. M. 

The Committee also recommend that the Selectmen 
be three in number and that they all be elected for one 
year. 

That the Assessors be three in number, and that one 
member be elected each year for three years. 

That the Board of Health be three in number, and 
that one member be elected each year for three years. 

That one Treasurer be elected for one year. 

That one Collector be elected for one year. 

That one Auditor be elected for one year. 

That two Constables be elected for one year. 

That one Tree Warden be elected for one year. 

That one member of the School Committee be elected 
each year for three years. 

That one member of the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners be elected each year for three years. 

That one member of the Board of Cemetery Com- 
missioners be elected each year for three years. 

That all other officers to be elected be elected in the 
usual way, either by ballot or nomination. 



45 

The Committee recommend that the Town does not 
accept the provisions of Section 364, Chapter 560, of 
the Acts of the year 1907, or any other act or acts 
them thereto enabling, whereby the Town may elect a 
Highway Surveyor for one year. 

The above report was unanimously accepted. 

ART. 3. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 4. Voted, To appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 
for further work on the highways. 

ART. 5. Voted, That the Committee on Claims be 
a Committee of the Town to receive and confer with 
any authorized committee of the First Parish, with a 
view to a settlement out of court of the controversy 
in relation to the ownership of the Common. 

Voted to adjourn. 
Attest : 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



46 



There have been recorded during the year ending 
Dec. 31, 1913, 31 Births, 13 Marriages, 10 Deaths. 



Births Registered, 



Date of Birth. 


Name of Child. 


Names of Parents. 


Jan. 


17, 


1913. 


Charles Benedict Lennon. 


Patrick J. and Mary J. (McDonald.) 


Jam. 


19, 


•' 


Nora Daniels. 


William C. and Margaret A. (Whalen.) 


Sept. 


6, 


1912. 


Robert Eliot Snelling. 


Howard and Eleanor G. (Goodwin) 


Sept. 


7, 


'■ 


John Biggs Fairar. 


Herbert G. and Edith (Biggs. ) 


Feb. 


28, 


1913. 


Craven. 


James J. and Florence M. (Feathei. ) 


March 


.10, 


'< 


Angleo Felicio Catona. 


Nicholas and Carolina (Monaco.) 


Aug. 


18, 


1842. 


James F. Hayden. 


Frederick A. and Julia A. (Fosdick. ) 


Sept. 
Feb. 


8, 


1896. 


Irving Benjamin Campbell. 


Jarris B. and Lucy (Clouden.) 


7, 


1897. 


James Edwaid Buckley. 


Eugene and Elizabeth (Roach. ) 


Feb. 


22, 


1913. 


Leo Joseph Hayes 


John and Delia (Kelly) 


March 31, 




Alice Anne Bennett. 


William J. and Ellen M, (Flood. ) 


March 25, 




Emma Victoria Graf. 


Edward and Mary (MacLeod.) 


April 


4, 




Marion Hazel Butcher. 


Henry A. and Elizabeth (Holinan.) 


April 


11, 




Meirill Hunt, Jr. 


Merrill and Hope (Woods. ) 


April 


28, 




Constance Myrtle Churchill. 


Carl L. and Josephine M. (Desjadon. ) 


June 


4, 




Harris. 


William P. and Ida (Tyler.) 


June 


15, 




Thomas J. Flannagan 


Thomas J. and Margaret (Thornton) 


July 


11, 




Elizabeth Blodgett. . 


Warren K. 2nd, and Margaret (Loring.) 


Aug. 


1, 




Martha Gertrude Johnson. 


Frank and Sarah (Braden. ) 


Aug. 


15, 




Margaret Ritchie Flint. 


Edward F. and Josephine M. (Ritchie.) 


Sept. 


2, 




Antonio Campobasso. 


Guiseppi and Anna (DiMeo.) 


Sept. 


19, 




John Thomas Kennedy 


John and Honor (Cole) 


Sept. 


23, 




Herman. 


Edwards W. and Gladys DeY (Field.) 


Nov. 


5, 




Chester Allen Bamforth 1 
— Clara Bamforth. ) 


Charles H. and Alice M. (Cousins.) 


Oct. 


15, 




Alfred McCormick. 


Frederick W. and Ellen (Brown. ) 


Oct. 


16, 




Todd. 


Charles Lee and M. Pauline (Eveleth. ) 


Nov. 


20, 




McAskill. 


Daniel A. and Marjorie A. (Morrison.) 


Dec. 


23, 




Richard Diamond. 


James and Catherine (Falvey. ) 


Aug. 


12. 




Joseph Neonico. 


Joseph and Nellie (Fitzgerald.) 


Dec. 


4, 




Mary Ellen Lopez. 

— Naff. 


Richard and Agnes (Coan. ) 
Fred and Mary (Flood.) 



47 



Marriages Registered 



Date of Marriage. 


Names. 


Residence. 


Jan. 


27, 1913. f 


Isaac B. Cook. 
Delia Casey. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


March 15, " / 


Fred Tyler. 

Ethel Annie Jenkins. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


April 


3, 4< 1 


Thomas F. Mullen. 
Nora Neville. 


Cambridge. 
Lincoln. 


April 


16, " f 


Edwin Stanton Blodgett. 
Marion Loring. 


Lincoln. 

Newton. 


May 


29, " | 


Thomas Gormley. 
Margaret F. Gilbert. 


Roxbury. 
Lincoln. 


June 


24, ''' / 


Charles Moorfield Storey. 
Susan Jameson Sweetser. 


Lincoln. 
Brookline. 


June 


24, " f 


Stephen Norman Bond. 
Anna Rodman Eldredge. 


Boston. 
Lincoln. 


July 


26, " t 


William H. Davis. , 
Alice May McPhee. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Sept. 


22, " f 


Benjamin Carson. 
May Osborne. 


Lexington. 
Lincoln. 


Oct. 


25, " f 


Isaac N. MacRae. 
Effie Lowden. 


Lincoln. 
Concord. 


Nov. 


19, " f 


Julius Malcolm Eveleth. 
Sarah Kendall Wheeler. 


Lincoln. 
Concord. 


Dec. 


18, " f 


William Rose Coutts. 
Mary E. J. Elias. 


Lincoln. 
Concord. 


Dec. 


31, " | 


Charles A. Watson. 
Gladys T. Thompson. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 



48 



Deaths Registered. 



Date of Death. 


Name. 


Y. 


Age. 

M. 


D. 


Feb. 


21. 


1913. 


William H. Flynn. 


42 


2 


19 


Feb. 


24. 


" 


Catherine Miner. 


1 


3 




April 


19, 


" 


Edward J. GUI. 


29 


11 


21 


June 


4, 


" 


Edward McHugh. 


75 


— 


— 


April 


15, 


" 


Thomas Wilaon. 


42 


— 


— 


July 


9, 


« 


Percy Batchelor. 


59 


— 


— 


Sept. 


3, 


ii 


Abagail Stearns Miner. 


90 


3 


17 


Oct. 


31, 


" 


Marion Brooks Chapin. 


15 


2 


26 


Sept. 


23, 


" 


Herman. 


— 


— 


— 


Nov. 


26, 


" 


Augustus Wheeler Scripture. 


74 


4 


21 



49 

EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS Chap. 29 

AS AMENDED BY CHAP. 280, ACTS OF 1912 

Sect. 1. Physicians and midwives shall, within forty- 
eight hours after the birth of every child in cases of 
which they were in charge, mail or deliver to the clerk 
or registrar of the city or town in which the birth oc- 
curred a notice stating the date and place of the birth, 
giving the street number, if any, the number of the 
ward in a city and the family name. Failure to mail or 
deliver the said notice shall be punished by a fine not 
exceeding twenty-five dollars for each offence. The 
notice required by this Section need not be given if the 
notice required by the following section is given within 
forty-eight hours after the birth occurs. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the 
birth of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to 
be given to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such 
child is bo? n. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other 
person who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be 
given notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for 
ten days after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not 
more than five dollars for such offence. 

DOGS LICENSED IN 1913. 
There have been 152 licenses issued as follows: — 
128 Males, 20 Females, 3 Sprayed Fennels, 1 Kennel, 
for which $381.60 has been paid to the CountyTreasurer. 

HUNTERS' LICENSES. 
There have been 25 Resident Hunters' Licenses 
issued for which $21.25 has been paid to the Commis- 
sioners on Fisheries and Game. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



51 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

I have examined the accounts of the Town Treasurer 
and also Treasurer of the Sinking Fund. I have seen 
vouchers for all money paid and all securities of the 
Town. 

Following is an account of the money paid by the 
Treasurer on the Selectmen's approval. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



52 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Selectmen present the following report for the 
fiscal year ending Jan. 31, 1914: — 

The Board was organized at a special meeting by the 
choice of Charles S. Smith, Chairman, and R. D. 
Donaldson, Secretary. 

The following table gives the appropriations made by 
the Town at the March Meeting, 1913, and the appro- 
priations recommended by the Board to be made at 
the next Annual Meeting, for the year ending December 
31, next: — 







The Selectmen 






recommend the 






following appro- 


Appropriations 


priations for the 




for 1913 


ensuing year 


For Schools, 


$11,000.00 


$11,000.00 


Support of Poor, 


500.00 


500.00 


Highways and Bridges, 


10,000.00 


9,000.00 


Library, Dog Tax, and, 


500.00 


500.00 


Interest, 


500.00 


500.00 


Cemeteries, 


250.00 


200.00 


Board of Health, 


200.00 


200.00 


Tree Warden, 


2,000.00 


500.00 


Suppression of Gypsy and 






Brown Tail Moths, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


Miscellaneous Expenses, 


4,500.00 


5,000.00 


Payment of Water Bonds, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


Sinking Fund, Water, 


2,173.37 


2,173.37 



53 



Hydrant and other public 

water service, 2,400 . 00 2,400 . 00 
Waltham Hospital, Free 

Bed, 250.00 250.00 

Street Lamps, 1,300.00 1,300.00 

Fire Department, 100 . 00 100 . 00 
Payment new Schoolhouse 

Bonds, 3,000.00 3,000.00 
Payment Interest New 

Schoolhouse Bonds, 1 , 600 . 00 1 ,480 . 00 
Suppression of Liquor 

Nuisance, 200.00 200.00 

The appropriations voted by the Town each year 
show a great increase. The increase over five years 
is approximately $20,000.00. If the present appro- 
priations are continued and not increased and the tax 
levy should be made on the value of the real estate alone, 
the tax rate would be upward of $33.00 on the thousand. 
Fortunately for the Town, there has been a large in- 
crease in the personal property valuation in recent 
years, which has enabled the Assessors to make a reason- 
ably low tax rate, but it should be remembered in this 
connection that at any time a large proportion of the 
personal property valuation may not be taxable in 
Lincoln and that the burden then would fall more 
heavily on the real estate. This is another reason why 
the Town should exercise great care and the strictest 
economy in voting appropriations. The tendency of 
the times is to extravagance and many cities and towns 
find their financial burden, on account of this extrava- 
gance, hard to bear. Fortunately for Lincoln, up to date 
the burden of taxation has been light upon all, and we 
trust that the affairs of the Town will be so managed 
that the situation in this respect will be equally favor- 
able in the future. 



54 



Appointments. 

Burial Agent, Joseph Dee. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Special Police, James E. Baker, John W. Rocks, 
John F. Farrar, Joseph DeLory, William A. Harding, 
F. E. Hawkes. 

Forest Fire Wardens, Charles S. Smith, C. Lee Todd, 
R. D. Donaldson, I. N. MacRae, John F. Farrar, James 
E. Baker, Wallace M. Brooks, Charles S. Wheeler. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at Annual State Election, 
James W. Lennon, Malcolm Eveleth, Thomas L. Giles, 
and Herbert G. Farrar. 

Superintendent of Streets, William H. Sherman. 

Janitor Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 

Forest Warden, J. J. Kelliher. 

Finances 

The Town now has a bonded debt on account of its 
Water Department of $83,000.00, as follows:— 

Issue of 1894, $ 1,000.00, due one each year. 



Issue of 1897, 


10,000.00, 


4 % bonds, due 1917. 


Issue of 1900, 


23,000.00 


3J% bonds, due 1930. 


Issue of 1902, 


9,000.00, 


3J% bonds, due 1932. 


Issue of 1903, 


5,000.00, 


4 % bonds, due 1933. 


Issue of 1904, 


5,000.00, 


4 % bonds, due 1934. 


Issue of 1906, 


14,000.00, 


4 % bonds, due 1936. 


Issue of 1907, 


4,000.00, 


4 % bonds, due 1937. 


Issue of 1911, 


5,500.00, 


4 % serial 1912 to 1924. 



Fourteen $500.00 bonds, $7,000.00 due one each year. 
There is also due the Town Treasury a Debt of approx- 
imately $6,000.00. 



55 



There is in the Sinking Fund to retire the bond issues 
of 1897, 1900, 1902, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, and 1907 
approximately $21,000.00, making the net debt of the 
Water Works $68,000.00. 

Although a vote was passed at the last Annual Meeting, 
authorizing the Town Treasurer to issue bonds of the 
Water Works for an amount not exceeding $6,000.00 to 
reimburse the treasury for money which had been ad- 
vanced for water construction purposes, no bonds were 
issued on account of an injunction suit which was brought 
by the Water Board to enjoin the issue of these bonds 
for the purpose above stated, and while no decision has 
yet been reached by the court in connection with the 
matter, it is to be presumed and hoped that the Water 
Board will, in order to keep the finances of the Water 
Works and Town distinctly separate, as heretofore de- 
termined by the Town by various votes, recommend 
some action by the Town at the next Annual Meeting 
to accomplish that result. It seems a clear proposition 
that if the Town votes that the General Treasury shall 
supply funds for the immediate and convenient use of 
the Water Board for water extension purposes, that no 
court proceedings should be necessary to enjoin the 
return of that money to the treasury in an ordinary and 
proper way. 

The total bond issue on accountof the new schoolhouse 
was $55,000.00, of which $18,000.00 has been retired 
leaving the bonded indebtedness on this account, Jan. 1, 
1914, $37,000.00. 

A sinking fund of $7,000, however, has been provided 
by votes passed at the last two Annual Meetings to 
reduce the indebtedness on account of the new school- 
house, which sum, deducted from the total present 
bonded indebtedness of $37,000.00, leaves a net debt on 
account of the present schoolhouse of $30,000.00. 

The Town should appropriate this year $1,480.00 on 



56 



account of interest on the schoolhouse bonds and 
$3,000.00 to retire bonds, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the issue. 

The Town Treasurer's Report shows that he has a 
balance in the Treasury, Jan. 31, 1914, of $4,315.38; that 
there are uncollected taxes for the year of $3,770.55, 
making the total amount of money available for the 
treasury $8,085.93, which, together with the sums which 
should be paid into the treasury on account of loan to 
the Water Works, of approximately $6,000.00, would 
make a balance in the treasury of about $14,000.00. 

Location of Telephone Station 

The location of the new telephone station of the New 
England Telephone & Telegraph Company at the writing 
of the last Annual Report was being agitated. Since 
then the house has been located on the site which had 
been recommended and urged by the Board of Select- 
men^ It must be apparent to all, even those who op- 
posed the present location, that the site has been well 
chosen and that if the building had been located nearer 
the street than at present, it would have been most 
unwise. 

Support of Poor 

The Auditor's Report shows an expenditure of $22.80 
during the year for the assistance of various people. 

Fire Department 

As heretofore, the Selectmen have appointed Fire 
Engineers. For a more detailed report, reference is 
made to their report. 

Tree Warden 

During the year the gypsy and brown tail moth work 
has been conducted under the direction of Mr. John J. 



57 



Kelliher, and his report gives the details in connection 
with this department. 

Silent Poor Fund 

Application has been received by the Selectmen 
during the year on account of two cases and a total has 
been paid from this fund of $60.00. The Fund at 
present is as reported by the Treasurer of the Trust 
Committee. 

Highways 

The Selectmen appointed Mr. William H. Sherman, 
Superintendent of Streets, and the highways have been 
under his charge. For more detailed information, 
reference is made to his report. 

The Selectmen, however, wish to call the attention of 
the Town to the desirability of providing some suitable 
and convenient place for the Town teams. When the 
Town first voted to purchase teams for highway work, 
these teams were for many years kept at Mr. Thomas 
Calkins, and he took entire care of them. Since then 
the teams have been kept at different places, usually 
in some isolated barn, where nobody lived near enough 
to take such care of them as they should have. It is 
obvious that when teams are kept in an isolated place 
that is not near enough to any house to have any dis- 
turbances in the barn heard by anybody, and when the 
person who takes care of them lives a mile and a half or 
two miles distant, that the teams cannot have the care 
which they should have. The Town is primarily re- 
sponsible for this condition and in our opinion this should 
be remedied at once, either by purchase or long lease by 
the Town of some suitable place. 

We recommend that the Town authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to investigate and take suitable action in 
connection with this matter. 



58 



Conclusion 

In conclusion, the Board is of the opinion that the 
business of the Town as a whole has been conducted con- 
scientiously and that the results have been fairly satis- 
factory. There is, however, always room for improve- 
ment and it is not difficult for the Board and probably 
not for the average citizen to point out where improve- 
ments should be made. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
JOHN F. FARRAR. 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



59 



SCHOOLS. 



Payments 

C. S. Lyman, Services as Superintendent, $550 00 

Walter F. Brackett, Teaching, 550 00 

Gertrude Brooks, Teaching, 275 00 

Hattie B. Heath, Teaching, 612 50 

Marion H. Cook, Teaching, 300 00 

Jean Allen, Teaching, 225 00 

Dorothy Haviland, Teaching, 250 00 

Elizabeth Cushing, Teaching, 250 00 

Abbie P. Smith, Teaching, 300 00 

Harriet J. Bartlett, Teaching, 120 00 

Bertha W. Bent, Teaching, 10 00 

Abbie H. Bowlby, Teaching, 300 00 

Katharine Works, Teaching, 250 00 

Helen M. Bowker, Teaching, 250 00 

Priscilla Ames, Teaching, 225 00 

Helen P. Jones, Teaching, 202 00 

C. S. Lyman, Cash paid for Postage, 10 79 

Gertrude Brooks, Boston & Maine Tickets, 12 30 

John F. Farrar & Son, Driving School Barge, 555 00 
John F. Farrar & Son, Taking Barge to and from 

Concord, 9 75 
John F. Farrar & Son, Mowing Grass at School- 
house, 
James B. Wheeler, Driving Barge, 
Thomas J. Dee, Driving Barge, 
Matthew H. Doherty, Carrying Children, 
National Express Co., Express, 
Boston & Maine, School Tickets, 
Boston & Maine, Freight, 



7 


00 


525 


00 


570 


00 


550 


00 


3 


00 


582 


50 


2 


12 



GO 



H. A. Wood, M. D., Professional Services, $200 00 
William Bulger, Painting and Repairing Barges, 75 00 
J. MacComber, Repairs on Barges, 74 30 

G. F. Whittemore, Repairs on Barge, 3 00 

Herbert Neally, Painting and Repairing Barge, 85 00 
Town of Concord, Tuition, 1,353 50 

City of Waltham, Tuition, 853 25 

E. Russell Davis, Janitorship of South School, 74 05 
Patrick J. Lennon, Jr., Janitorship of South 

School, 41 50 

Edward Bannon, Janitorship of Center School, 500 00 
Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 345 80 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Wood, 9 00 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Coal, 4 40 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Moving Ashes, 2 25 
Carlton B. Wheeler, Supplies, 8 50 
W. F. Baker, Carrying Pupils to Concord, 11 70 
John D. Fleming, Carrying Pupils to Concord, 17 50 
L. E. Brooks, Carrying Pupils to Concord, 17 45 
L. M. Eldredge, Tuning Piano, 2 00 
Mrs. Charles Foreman, Repairing Flag, 1 00 
Jas. T. Laird, Sharpening Mower, 1 25 
Lincoln Water Works, Water Service South 

School, 25 50 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Service Center 

School, 
Roger Sherman, Moving Ashes, 
William Robus, Repairing School Bell, 
Bertha W. Bent, Taking School Census, 
Herbert W. Farrar, School Ticket, 
M. H. Doherty, Carriage Hire, 
Howes, Stove & Furnace Exchange, Examining 

Furnace, 
George L. Cousins, eight dozen Eggs, 
Abbie P. Smith, Cash paid for Supplies, 
Geo. E. Cunningham, Labor on School Grounds, 



102 


50 


8 


60 


2 


25 


10 


00 


2 


80 


47 


00 


3 


70 


2 


00 


9 


33 


8 


00 



61 



F. E. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

South Lincoln Dairy Co., Supplies, 

I. N. MacRae, Supplies, 

A. R. McLeod, Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

Herman Goldberger, Supplies, 

E. E. Babb & Co., Supplies, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Current Events, Supplies, 
Buttrick Lumber Co., Supplies, 
Lexington Lumber Co., Supplies, 
Henry C. Doherty, Supplies, 
Chandler & Barber, Supplies, 
Robert D. Donaldson, Supplies, 
Henry C. Stocher & Co., Supplies, 
Benjamin H. Sanborn & Co., Supplies, 
Hobbs & Warren, Supplies, 5 50 
Milton Bradley Co., Supplies, 15 40 
S. B. & B. W. Fleicher, Supplies, 1 00 
American Seating Co., Supplies, 
J. B. Hunter & Co., Supplies, 

F. B. Alexander, Supplies, 
Thompson Brown Co., Supplies, 
School Specialty, Supplies, 
Cable Company, Supplies, 
R. D. Donaldson, Labor, 
I. N. MacRae, Labor, 



$9 


00 


3 


85 


85 


98 


3 


38 


5 


25 


19 


40 


206 


09 


96 


35 


8 


00 


17 


68 


61 


83 


4 40 


11 


84 


7 


51 


42 00 


10 


85 



Total, 





90 


8 


61 


11 


55 


3 


00 


7 


00 


29 


18 


26 


93 


$12,158 


54> 



62 



HIGHWAYS 



Payments 

William H. Sherman, Superintendent of 

Streets, $1,153 79 

Timothy Ahearn, Labor, 804 50 

John W. Rooney, Labor, 532 76 

William Ryan, Labor, 495 14 

Dennis Doherty, Labor, 140 76 

Patrick Craven, Labor, 389 38 

Martin J. Rooney, Labor, 518 88 

Joseph Mahan, Labor, 336 50 

Charles Rooney, Labor, 50 50 

William Riley, Labor, 7 75 

Joe Monello, Labor, 94 63 

George H. Sherman, Labor, 13 50 

John MacComber, Repairs, 38 75 
John A. Burgess & Son, Shoeing and Repairs, 215 75 

Dan McAskill, Shoeing and Repairs, 46 10 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Hay and Grain, etc., 743 05 

C. S. Smith, Hay, 98 75 

Daniel E. Sherman, Hay, 219 12 

C. G. Peck, Straw, 27 00 

John F. Farrar & Son, Six Bushels Carrots, 3 00 

Waltham Coal Co., Pipe, 29 04 

John F. Farrar & Son, Hay, 83 00 

Charles Skoglund, Inspecting Boiler, 5 00 

Byron Bradstreet, Repairs on Highways, 50 00 

Daniel H. Sherman, Superintendent Labor, 8 50 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 13 99 

Frank Peterson, Horse, 320 00 

Standard Oil Co., Road Oil, 1,048 28 
Jos. S. Hart, M. D., Rent of Barn, One Year, 104 00 

Barrett Mfg. Co., Tarvia, 796 10 

National Express Co., Express, 40 






63 



Lincoln Water Works, Water at Crusher, $10 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Water at Town Barn, 12 00 

W. E. Peterson, M. D., Services, 43 45 
Town of Concord, Placing and Rolling Tarvia, 44 95 

J. W. Nelson, One Cord Wood, 6 00 

Wallace M. Brooks, Rent of Land, 25 00 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 60 26 

S. H. Davis Co., Supplies, 3 00 

Massachusetts State Prison, Supplies, 120 00 

Good Road & Mach. Co., Supplies, 24 60 

Benjamin W. Pike, Supplies, 15 60 

Studebaker Bros. Co., Supplies, 281 65 

Edson Mfg. Co., Supplies, 29 70 

Peter Perry, Supplies, 24 60 

C. W. Carpenter, Supplies, 64 80 
Joseph Breck & Son, Supplies, 8 25 
Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 20 12 
Buttrick Lumber Co., Supplies, 58 52 
New England Road Mach. Co., Supplies, 5 00 
Frank H. Cunningham, Labor of Horses and Men, 59 13 
George E. Cunningham, Labor of Horses and 

Men, 103 50 
Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor of Horses and Men, 66 75 

D. E. Sherman, Labor of Horses and Men, 360 76 
M. L. Snelling, Labor of Horses and Men, 70 88 
Waltham Trap Rock Co., Crushed Stone, 2,070 44 
John Wilson, Crushed Stone, 20 00 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 79 45 
Hodge Boiler Works, Labor and Supplies, 106 77 
F. H. Cunningham, Repairs and Labor at Crusher, 50 30 
R. D. Donaldson, Supplies and Labor, 253 23 
I. N. McRae, Labor, 3 65 
Eugene Jose, Stone, 54 15 
L. E. Brooks, Stone, 76 80 
John Fleming, Stone, 9 00 
F. H. Cunningham, Stone, 11 25 



64 



Mrs. M. A. Sherman, Gravel, 
Elvira Brown, Gravel, 
T. A. Calkins, Gravel, 
Annie Morrissey, Gravel, 
Flint Bros., Gravel, 
C. S. Wheeler, Stone, 

Total, 



$35 


10 


29 


70 


39 


45 


4 


00 


91 


75 


5 


50 


$12,846 


98 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Payments 

Edward Bannon, Janitor of Public Buildings, $999 96 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone Service, 51 40 

Electric Light Co., Light Service, Town Hall, 67 80 

Boston & Maine R. R., R. R. Ticket, 

George E. Crosby Co., Printers, 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printers, 

Wakefield Daily Item, Printers, 

Daniels Printing Co., Printers, 

Thomas Groom Co., Printers, 

P. B. Murphy, Printers, 

A. W. Brownell, Printers, 

James T. Laird, Services as Constable, 1912, 

Winslow Eaton, Services as Constable, 1912, 

George E. Cunningham, Services as Constable, 

1912, 
John F. Farrar, Services as Special Police, 1912, 
National Express Co., Express, 
William F. Farrar & Co., Returning Death 

Notices, y 
John F. Farrar, Court Fees, 



2 


00 


412 


50 


2 


50 


1 


50 


9 


50 


13 


25 


2 


45 




60 


40 


00 


25 


00 


50 


00 


15 


00 


2 


24 


2 


25 


12 


00 



65 



Frank Cunningham, Court Fees, 

John J. Kelliher, Court Fees, 

James T. Laird, Court Fees, 

American Bonding Co., Tax Bond, 

C. S. Wheeler, Certificate of notes, 

Winslow Eaton, Services at Elections, 

Herbert G. Farrar, Services at Elections, 

Herman T. Wheeler, Services at Elections, 

Thomas L. Giles, Services at Elections, 

James T. Laird, Services at Elections, 

James W. Lennon, Services at Elections, 

Sumner Smith, Services at Elections, 

James J. Walsh, Returning Birth, 

Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Returning Births, 

General Fire Proofing Co., Labor at Town Hall, 82 40 

David Farquar, Binding Books, 

Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle, 

John F. Farrar, Setting Bounds at Schoolhouse, 

Henry F. Bryant, Surveying and Attendance at 

Court, 88 37 

Mabel M. Brewston, Land Court Stenographer, 310 11 
G. A. A. Pevey, Legal Services at Land Court, 750 00 
Anthony J. Doherty, Legal Services at Land 

Court, 850 00 

Tuttle Stable, Barge, Memorial Day, 6 50 

C. S. Wheeler, Insurance on Schoolhosue, 150 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Insurance on South School, 75 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Insurance on Town Hall, 38 88 

Thomas W. Scott, Painting Schoolhouse, 363 34 

Boston Plating Co., Plating Weights, 7 89 

Boston & Maine R. R., Demurrage on Car, 1 00 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 368 94 

George L. Chapin, Insurance on Schoolhouse, 75 00 
George L. Chapin, Insurance on South School, 28 80 
C. S. Smith, Insurance on Town Hall, 59 80 

C. S. Smith, Wood, 5 25 



$4 


72 


13 


25 


9 


85 


75 


00 


6 


00 


5 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


7 


00 


7 


00 


7 


00 




25 


2 


50 


82 


40 


5 


00 


47 


45 


3 


00 



m 



C. S. Smith, Printing, Supplies and Express, $19 98 
C. S. Smith, Selectman, Overseer and Registrar 185 00 
R. D. Donaldson, Selectman, Overseer and 

Registrar, 185 00 

John F. Farrar, Selectman, Overseer and Reg- 
istrar, 185 00 
John F. Farrar, Special . Police, 1913, 10 00 
John F. Farrar, Cash paid for Photographs, 6 00 
R. D. Donaldson, Postage, 3 00 
C. S. Wheeler, Services as Tax Collector,- 300 00 
C. S. Wheeler, Collector of Taxes, $55,174.00 827 60 
C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, A. J. 

Doherty Land, 6 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, A. A. Ray 

Estate, 141 01 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, Poll Tax, 51 80 
C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, % Returns, 24 00 
C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, J. B. 

Bradley, 
C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, 
C. S. Wheeler, Postage and Express, 
C. S. Wheeler, Services as Assessor, 
W. H. Sherman, Services as Assessor, 
William C. Pierce, Services as Assessor, 
William C. Pierce, Copying on Books, 
Matthew H. Doherty, Sealer of Weights and 

Measures, 
Matthew H. Doherty, Making Trips to Concord, 
Charles E. Woodhull, Care of Piano, 1913, 
R. D. Donaldson, Labor on Town Hall, 
R. D. Donaldson, Labor on Town Scales, 
R. D. Donaldson, Raising and Lowering Flag- 
Pole, 15 00 
Geroge L. Chapin, Services as Town Clerk, 100 00 
George L. Chapin, Services as Registrar, 15 00 
Isaac N. McRae, Labor at Town Hall, 1 50 



58 


31 


373 


63 


19 


03 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


35 


00 


40 


00 


7 


00 


8 


00 


10 


95 


5 


55 



67 



F. H. Cunningham, Blasting on Station Road, $5 00 
William Riley, Labor on Station Road, 9 00 

John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Men on Station 

Road, 153 37 

Jerry Moynihan, Labor on Station Road, 22 51 

John F. Farrar, Superintendent, Labor on 

Station Road, 39 00 

Town Treasurer, Cash to be Credited School 

Department, 
Highway Department, Teaming Coal, 
James T. Laird, Sharpening Lawn Mower, 
James T. Laird, Fire Extinguishers, 
W. & L. E. Genley, Supplies, 
Henry K. Barnes & Co., Supplies, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 
Geo. E. Cunningham, Labor at Fires, 
John W. Nelson, Labor at Fires, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Labor at Fires, 
Winslow Eaton, Labor at Fires, 
Henry A. Butcher, Labor at Fires, 
T. J. Dee, Labor at Fires, 
Fritz Cunnert, Labor at Fires, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Labor at Fires, 
Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor at Fires, 
James W. Lennon, Services as Auditor, 

Total, $8,622 64 



50 


00 


75 


00 


1 


25 


172 


00 


46 


10 


321 


50 


6 


75 


6 


10 


1 


60 


1 


40 


63 


20 


9 


60 


2 


00 


6 


45 


2 


00 


3 


00 


17 


20 


125 


00 



68 

GYPSY MOTH WORK 
Payments 

John J. Kelliher, Services as Superintendent, $883 50 

John J. Kelliher, Labor of Horse, 93 40 

Henry A. Butcher, Labor, 538 26 

John Cannair, Labor, 614 25 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 491 76 

Patrick J. Lennon, Jr., Labor, 606 27 

James O'Brien, Labor, 197 76 

George Sherman, Labor, 236 76 

Joseph Mahan, Labor, 27 00 

Jerry Moynihan, Labor, 34 00 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Services, 14 45 

Frank Cunningham, Delivering Sprayer, 5 25 

John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Men, 95 63 

M. L. Snelling, Labor of Team, 172 50 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 4 49 

Wright & Potter, Printing, 3 25 

Daniel E. Sherman, Labor of Team, 230 25 

Robert D. Donaldson, Gasoline, 10 00 
Eagle Oil & Supply Co., 10 Gallons Engine Oil, 5 00 

W. L. Bumpus, Filing Saws, 4 00 

M. H. Doherty, Labor and Gasoline, 33 57 

Highway Department, Storing Sprayer, 25 00 

F. W. Rane, New Sprayer, 79 20 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 25 

H. S. Cousins & Son, Supplies, 1 76 

R. D. Donaldson, Supplies, 5 50 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Teaming Supplies from 

Wayland, 2 00 

M. M. Welch, Labor on Tree Work, 11 25 

F. H. Cunningham, Labor on Tree Work, 11 50 

Total, $4,437 81 



69 



CEMETERY 



Payments 

Roger Sherman, Labor, $380 05 

Lincoln Water Works, Two Years' Water 

Service, 20 00 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 3 82 



Total, $403 87 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Payments 

M. M. Welch, Inspecting Meat, $134 50 

M. M. Welch, Fumigating, 5 00 

M. M. Welch, Cleaning Watering Trough, 3 00 

Waltham District Nursing School, Services of 

Nurse, 40 10 



Total, $182 60 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Payments 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 
I. N. McRae, Labor on Hose, 
Thomas J. Dee, Labor on Hose, 
Thirty-seven Firemen, Two Years' Salary. 

Total, $175.45 



$4 20 


8 


25 


15 


00 


148 


00 



70 
STREET LIGHTS 



Payments 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for January, $108 38 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for February, 101 96 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for March, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for April, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for May, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for June, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for July, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for August, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for 

September, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for October, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Service for 

November, 107 86 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for December, 112 . 81 



104 


06 


99 


95 


97 


76 


92 


77 


95 


92 


96 


10 


102 


02 


113 


25 



Total, $1,232 84 



SUPPORT OF POOR 



Payment 



C. S. Smith, Cash paid Mr. Ellsworth, $20 80 

Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Care of Harry Vernon, 2 00 



Total, $22 80 



71 
LINCOLN LIBRARY 




Payments 
John F. Farrar, Dog Tax, 
John F. Farrar, Appropriation, 


$314 28 
500 00 


Total, 


$814 28 


INTEREST 





Payments 

C. D. Parker & Co., Note, Due December, 19.13, 

$10,000, Discount, 326 08 

Commissioner of Massachusetts, Note, Due 

December, 1913, $10,000, Discount, 226 39 



Total, $552 47 



LEE'S BRIDGE ACCOUNT 



Payments 
Lincoln Highway Department, Labor at Bridge, $657.23 



BONDS. NEW SCHOOLHOUSE 



Payments 

First National Bank, Payment of Bonds Due, $3,000 00 
Commissioners of Sinking Fund, By Vote of 

March 3, 1913, 4,000 00 

Total, $7,000 00 



72 
INTEREST. NEW SCHOOLHOUSE 



Payments 

First National Bank, Coupons, Due July 1st, $800 00 

First National Bank Coupons, Due January 1st, 800 00 

Total, $1,600 00 



BORROWED MONEY 



Payments 



State Treasurer, Payment of Note, No. 6, 

from taxes $10,000, $10,000 00 

State Treasurer, Payment of Note, No. 7, 

from Taxes $10,000, $10,000 00 



Total, $20,000 00 



HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE 

Payments 

Lincoln Water Works, Hydrants, etc, $2,018 94 

Lincoln Water Works, Watering Troughs, 224 52 
Lincoln Water Works, Water, Town Hall, 50 00 



Total, $2,293 46 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



Payments. 
Waltham Hospital, Appropriation, Total $250.00 



73 



RECAPITULATION 





Payments 




Schools, 




$12,158 54 


Highway, 




12,846 98 


Miscellaneous, 




8,622 64 


Gyspy Moth Work, 




4,437 81 


Cemetery, 




403 87 


Board or Health, 




182 60 


Fire Department, 




175 45 


Street Lights, 




1,232 84 


Support of Poor, 




22 80 


Lincoln Library, 




814 28 


Interest, 




552 47 


Bonds, New Schoolhouse, 


7,000 00 


Interest, New Schoolhouse, 


1,600 00 


Borrowed Money, 




20,000 00 


Hydrants and Other 


Water Service, 


2,293 46 


Walt ham Hospital, 




250 00 


Water, 




12,216 63 


Lee's Bridge Account, 




657.23 




$85,467 60 



74 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND MEAT 

To Board of Selectmen: — 

I herewith submit following report of animals slaugh- 
tered during the year 1913: 

Pigs 697 



Calves . 

Cows . 

Bulls . 

Sheep . 

Pigs condemned 

Calves condemned 



162 

54 

2 

41 

6 

7 



MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of the Board of Health. 






75 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 



To the Board of Health: — 

I herewith submit the following report from Feb. 1, 
1913 to Feb. 1, 1914: 



Number of herds of cows 

Number of cows in milk 

Number of cows dry 

Number of young stock 

Number of bulls 

Number of pigs 

Number of sheep 

Number of goats 

Number of cows quarantined 

Number of cows taken for tuberculosis 

Number of cows quarantined and released 

Number of horses quarantined 

Number of horses quarantined and released 

Number of horses taken for glanders 



98 

683 

104 

148 

26 

654 

155 

2 

7 

6 

1 

3 

2 

1 



MARTON M. WELCH, 

Inspector of Animals. 



70 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit the 
sixth annual report, ending Jan. 31, 1914. 

Force 

Thirty-seven men belong to the department: one 
chief, six assistant engineers and 30 call men. There 
are three organized companies. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus belonging to the Department is as fol- 
lows: — Four hose carriages, 25 fire extinguishers, four 
ladders, one harness, hose, axes and plaster hooks. 

Location of Apparatus 

No. 1. Hose house, old schoolh'ouse, Lincoln Centre. 
No. 2. Kept at F. E. Cousins' grain store, South Lincoln. 
No. 3. Hose house, John Dee farm, Virginia Road, 

North Lincoln. 
No. 4. Kept at John Farrar's, South Lincoln. 

Fires 

Within the past year, we have had but few brush fires, 
several chimney fires, a loss of one house and stable and 
a partial loss of one house, making a total loss of about 
$31,000. 

We would recommend that the Town purchase a motor 
truck as it is impossible to get horses when most needed. 

ISAAC N. MACRAE, Chief, 
WM. C. ROBUS, 
WM. SHERMAN, 
THOMAS DEE, 
HERBERT FARRAR, 
HAROLD S. COUSINS, 
J. J. KELLIHER. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending Feb. 1, 1914: 

I wish to say that in my estimation there was never a 
winter so hard on the roads as last winter, as there was 
in the roadway at any one time but a small amount of 
frost and each time it softened up, the roads were cut to 
pieces very badly. The roads from the Weston line to 
Concord and Wayland lines were in a very bad condition, 
being cut up and hollowed out in the center so that the 
water stood in the ruts and the middle of the road. It 
took about 60 carloads of crushed stone to fix them up 
and make them in good condition for travel. I used 
what crushed stone there was at the crusher to fill up the 
ruts and soft places in the north and east parts of the 
Town, covering them with the scraper, thus making 
them smooth for the season. I have used in all over 
1,300 loads of gravel in different parts of the Town and 
have had built about 1,000 feet of plank fence in danger- 
ous places. 

There has been paid out during the year for hay, grain, 



etc. 


over 


$1,100 00 


For 


supplies and repairs, over 


6,000 00 


a 


outside labor and teams, over 


1,000 00 


it 


Superintendent's salary and horse hire 






and labor, over 


4,500 00 


a 


rent, 


150 00 



$12,750 00 
There are in credits from Labor and Material, 

about, $1,000 00 



78 



The following is a list of where the money has been 
expended for building gravel road: 

Charles F. Adams Road, 

Peirce Hill and Tower 

Causeway Hill 

Turnpike 

Lexington 

Flints 

Page 

Trapelo 

Winter Street 

Dr. Herman 

For building crushed stone road on th( 

South Great Road, 
Concord " 

Subdury St. " 
Center of Town, 
Turnpike, 
Other places about 

Also the expense of scraping the roads and cleaning 
out gutters, putting in drain pipe culverts, etc. 

We have on hand for Spring use in different parts of 
the Town and at the crusher about 1,200 tons of crushed 
stone. Over 200 tons of this stone was purchased 
from the Waltham Trap Rock Company, to be paid for 
from the next year's appropriation. The carts and tools 
are in about the same condition as last year. 

I found that it was necessary to buy two sets of harness 
last Spring, as the old ones were in such bad condition. 
At present we have only four horses, one having been so 
old and lame that we thought it advisable to have him 
killed, and the one that we bought last Spring having 
died in October, leaves the department one team short 
for the Spring work. 



550 Feet 


3,000 


it 


2,100 


a 


1,000 


a 


1,400 


a 


450 


a 


650 


it 


550 


a 


1,100 


a 


275 


it 


8,600 Feet. 


5,500 


a 


4,675 


it 


1,600 


it 


1,550 


it 


1,000 


it 



79 



It seems to me that if we are to keep our roads up to 
standard we shall have to use more Tarvia or some other 
bituminous product as a binder to hold our roads in 
place. 

The guide-boards are in good order and in their proper 
places. 

Respectfully yours, 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



80 



c Wt(MCC 
» ° £ ~* S 2 



M 
H 
<! 

PL, 



-I 2? °= ^ 

Eh d « g 

• >M • 0> fc, o 

& * ^ m^ 
CZJ CO O Ph OQ PQ 



o 

00 

e 



© 



C00NMCO 

CNNfflOO 



HH1QHO 



MTtiOtOC^ONOiOOOOCOOoOCOSO) |o 

OiOOOOOOOONOOOOOHOOCOHtO I 00 

"* 00 O 00 r-i ,-< O CO rt< O CO --< © Ci O iO 1> CO ^* I iO 

— it^O T f CO iC CNJ lO CO iO Oi O CO "0 "0 CN CO 

HNHHO I CM 



§£ss 






i£3 

tn o O 

goo 

£■8-0= 



-*T3 

g£ 

ffiK 



' CCC20 



•S 



fl 



£ ° S? £ 



02 O 



O CO £ 

J § g 



00 






co^ 

3 ri /ii d ■" C30j-^-^ 

J R «S 91 ^ r r rj K 

i_o ™% co orH 5 °> 

■I H H ^ >-l H-s _c3 S^ 1-1 



81 



Report of the Commissioners of Sinking and 
Trust Funds. 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS. 

In Account with 

TOWN OF LINCOLN. 

1913. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Coupons, Town of Lincoln 3^s . . . $105.00 

Coupons, New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s . 50 . 00 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s . . 80.00 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s (Serial) . -. 220.00 

Nov. 1. $500 Town of Lincoln, Serial 4s, due . . 500.00 

26. Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer . . . 2,173.37 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 . . . 400.00 
1914. 

Feb. 1. Balance 511.52 

$4,039.89 

1913. Cr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $2913.37 

Dec. 29. $1,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 . . . 1025.32 

1914. 
Jan. 1. Interest 101.20 



$4,039.89 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 

$1,000 New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s, due 1915. 

$5,500 Town of Lincoln 4s, Serial Bonds due 1912 to 1923. 

$11,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1936. 

$3,000 Town of Lincoln 3£s of 1932. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



82 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

FUND FOR EXTRA SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 

1913. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance ' . $57.17 

Coupon Town of Lincoln 4s .... 120.00 

Dec. 24. Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer . . . . 4,000.00 

Interest 6.42 



$4,183.59 
1913. Cr. 

Dec. 24. $2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1917 (from 

special Water Works Sinking Fund ) . . $2,002.57 
1914. 
Feb. 1. Balance 2,181.02 

$4,183.59 

The Fund is invested as follows: 
$3,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1936. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1917. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



83 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

SPECIAL WATER WORKS SINKING FUND 



1913. 

Feb. 


1. 
1. 


Dr. 

Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s 
$2000 Town of Lincoln 4s, 1917, 
Schoolhouse Sinking Fund ) . 

Cr. 
Balance 


( To Extra 


$80.00 
2,002.57 


1913. 
Feb. 


$2,082 57 
$2,000.00 




Interest 




82.57 












$2082.57 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



84 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 



1913. 
Feb. 



1913. 




Jan. 


15 


Jan. 


20. 


1914. 




Feb. 


1 



Dr. 

Balance 

Dividends, N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co. 
Dividends, West End St. Ry. com. 
Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Dividends, West End St. Ry. pfd. . 
Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 
Due, $500 Illinois Steel 5s 
Coupons, $500 Illinois Steel 5s . 
Interest on deposit . . 



Cr. 
$500 United Fruit Co. 4|s of 1923 . 
Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 

Balance on deposit, principal account 



$4.41 
40.00 
3.50 
32.00 
52.00 
64.00 
500.00 
12.50 
13.55 

$721 . 96 



$474.81 
217.55 

29.60 

$721.96 

The Fund is invested as follows : 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co., preferred. 
8 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
1 share West End Street Railway Co., common. 
$500 United Fruit Co. 4|s of 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



85 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 

1913. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance 

Dividends, N. Y , N. H. & H. R. R. . 
Dividends, Fitchburg Railroad Co. 
Interest 



1913. Cr. 

Jan. 20. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 

1914. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account . 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co., preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 



$33 02 

10.00 

35.00 

1.45 


$79.47 


$46 45 
33.02 


$79.47 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



86 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT 
OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1913. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance . . $7.25 

Dividends, West End Street Railway, common 40 . 00 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 4s ... 7. 00 

Interest : 52 



$54.77 



1913. Cr. 

Jan. 20. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library . $47.52 

1914. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account . . 7.25 



$54.77 



The Fund is invested as follows: 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
2 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



87 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 

1913. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $47.50 

Dividend, West End Street Railway Co. . . 3 . 50 

$1,000 Mississippi Valley Gas & Electric 5s, 1922 . 890 . 00 

Interest, Mississippi Valley Gas & Electric 5s, 1922 24 . 58 

Coupon, General Gas & Electric Co. 6s . 27 . 67 

Interest ........ .05 



$993.30 
1913. Cr. 

May 2. $1,000 General Gas & Electric Co. 6s . . . $987.33 

1914. 
Jan. 20. Cash, J. F. Fanar, Treasurer, Lincoln Library 5.97 



$993.30 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

1 share West End Street Railway, common. 
$1,000 General Gas & Electric Co. 6s, due 1916. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



88 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN LIBRARY 

1931. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $19.40 

Dividends, West End St. Railway, common . 17 . 50 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. 48 . . 40.00 

Coupons, Pennsylvania R.R. Conv. 3|s . . 35.00 

Interest 1.77 



$113.67 



1913. Cr. 

Jan. 20. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer, Lincoln Library . $94.27 

1914. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, principal account . . . 19.40 



$113.67 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co., Convertible 3|s, 1915. 
5 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



89 



TRUST FUND COMMISSONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT POOR. 

1913. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $263.82 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s . ". 40.00 

Coupons, Penns\ lvania Railroad Co. Conv. 3^s 35 . 00 

Interest 10 00 

$348.82 
1913. Cr. 

April 15. Cash, Selectmen's order $50.00 

Nov. 28. Cash, Selectmen's order 10.00 

1914. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit, income account . . . 243.82 

Balance on deposit, principal account . . 45.00 

$348.82 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Conv., 3|s, due 1915. 
$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s, due 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



90 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN HEARSE 

1913. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $33 35 

Dividend, Pennsylvania R. R. . . . 33 00 

Rights 6 04 

Interest on deposit 1 24 

$73 81 

1914. Cr. 

Feb. 1. Balance on deposit $73 81 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

11 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co, 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



91 
THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND TRUSTEES 

In Account ivith 
THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND. 



1913. 






Dr. 




Feb. 1. 


Balai 
Divic 


ice 




$981 69 




lends 


. Pennsylvania Railroad 


135 00 








Boston & Providence R. R. 


100.00 








N.Y.,N.H.&H.R.R. . 


50.00 








Fitchburg R. R. pfd 


50.00 








Old Colony R.R 


70 00 








Boston & Albany R. R. . 


87.50 








Boston & Maine R. R. 


10.00 








American Tel. & Tel. Co. . 


480.00 








Boston & Lowell R.R. 


240.00 








West End St. Ry. pfd. 


40.00 








Northern Idaho & Mont. Power pfd. 


75.00 




Rights, 


Pennsylvania Railroad 


21.95 




Coupons, 


New York Railway, 4s 


40.00 




u 


Utah Co., 6s 


180.00 




u 


Southern Railway, 4s ... 


120.00 




(I 


New York Ry. Adj. (1912) . 


30.84 




11 


New York Ry. Adj. (1913) . 


155.44 




Inter 


est on deposit 


18.77 



$2,886.19 



1913. Cr. 

Feb. 3. Powell Printing Co., Programme, Oct. 19 . 

4. Powell Printing Co., Programme, Jan. 28 . 

5. Atlanta University Quartette. July 16, 1912 

6. Lewis B. Allyn, Lecture .... 
21. Alexander Lockwitzky, Lecture 

March 6. The Fisher Shipp Concert Co., Concert . 

19. Claude Bennett, Lectuie .... 

April 1. O. L. Storey Scenic Co., a/c Stage Scenery 

3. Chauncey J. Hawkins, Lecture . 

8. M. H. Doherty, Teams, to March 1st 

June 2. 100 Rights — Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

3. Subscription — 10 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 



$8.50 
8.75 
50.00 
75.00 
75.00 
75.00 

135.00 
89.50 
50.00 
25.50 
45.00 

500.00 



92 



Sept. 


4 


Oct. 


22 




23 




29 


Nov. 


18 


Dec. 


3 




17 




24 




30 




31 


1914 




Jan. 


2 




5 




6 




12 




23 



J. F. Farrar & Son, Barge, Jan. 23 and March 13 

P. A. Carter, Envelopes, stamps and labor 

Dr. E. H. Byington, Lecture 

George L. Cousins, Barge (3 ) 1912 . 

Lincoln Wirt, Lecture 

Charles C. Gorst, Lecture . 

Belvidere Singers, Concert . 

P. A. Carter, Postals and Labor 

Powell Printing Co., Programmes (2 ) 

Champ Clark, Lecture 



M. H. Doherty, Teams, to Nov. 1. . 
Anchor Linotype Printing Co., postals 
J. F. Farrar & Co., Barge, Dec. 17 
The Scotney Co., Concert .... 
P. A. Carter, Envelopes, Stamps and Labor 



6.00 

2.75 
38.00 

9.00 
50.57 
25.00 
87.50 

2.85 

11.50 

300.00 

10.50 

2.00 

3.00 

150.00 

2.75 



Feb. 



Balance 



1,047.52 

$2,886.19 



The Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows: 

50 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

30 " Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Providence Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 

10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co. 

10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 

10 " West End Street Railway, preferred. 

10 " New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. Co. 

10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co., common. 

60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co., pfd. 
$3,000 Utah Co., 6s, of 1917. 
$4,000 New York Railways Co., 5s of 1942. 
$1,000 New York Railways Co., 4s of 1942. 
$3,000 Southern Railway Co., 4s of 1956. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



93 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING JAN. 31, 1914 

An epidemic of measels occurred during the Spring of 
1913. There were 48 cases reported. 

Other contagious diseases were as follows : — one tuber- 
culosis; one infantile paralysis; three diphtheria. 

No written complaints of alleged nuisances have been 
received during the past year. 

The fumigation of the schoolhouses has been syste- 
matically performed as usual. 

No Inspector of Meat was appointed; the work having 
been done by a member of the Board of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. W. HERMAN, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
MARTIN M. WELCH. 



94 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report : 



Number of residents assessed on property, 


246 


a 


non- residents assessed on property 


103 


(I 


assessed on polls only, 


187 


(I 


acres of land assessed, 


8,740 


it 


dwelling houses assessed, 


258J 


(i 


horses assessed, 


337 


C( 


cows assessed, 


640 


<e 


neat cattle other than cows assessed, 


104 


(< 


swine assessed, 


246 


u 


sheep assessed, 


240 


Value 


of land, exclusive of buildings, $562,070 00 


u 


buildings, exclusive of land, 


880,545 00 



" real estate, 

" personal estate, 

Total valuation, 
State tax, 
County tax, 
State highway tax, 
Town grants, 



Total, $50,907 45 



$1,442,615 00 


2,934,995 00 


$4,377,610 00 


$7,680 00 


3,874 45 


103 00 


39,250 00 



95 



Number of polls, 


335 


Deduct part of corporation tax, 


$2,083 74 


Rate $11.00 per $1,000. 




Amount to be collected 


$48,823 71 



CHARLES S. WHEELER, 
WM. C. PEIRCE, 
WM. H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors. 



96 



r — ^ 

a .2 

sl-giS 

OS « 

gg « 



tOOO*OtO<MtOOCOOCOtOOOOOOOOtOO 
NQO^iONCOO)ONOOO(N(N(M(NOiO(M^O 



i>- C5 tH i— I C* t— I 

of 



CX)(N^C^C0cOcDIr^TtH 

T— I lO T— I CO 



o o 

O 00 

rft CD 
O Oi 



tO i^ CO to 



to (M ^H 



O O 
CD O 



t^ ^h 



»oooooooo 

C*(NOOOtOO*tO 

OOC^COCOCOCDCDOQ 
^H CO CO CO t-h iO 00 



GO 

XI 

<^ 

H 

H 
S3 

Q 

GO 



o o 

o o 

© 00^ 

^oo" 

CD 



oooo oo oooooooo 

0*0-0*10 OO. lO o o o o o o o 

*o o* ^h <© <P^ i> o* 0^0^0*0 0**0 

r-Tr-T O" CO"c0"co'rH"T|^l>r 



to 

CO 



o* 
o* 



O O CO 

^ o ^ 



y& i— I tJH 



CO 

oo 



00 o 

oq o* 

i— I o 
i—l CO 

to 



to o 

o o 

"•* 

CO 



P££w 



o 
to 

°i 

1—1 
CD 



o 
o* 
o* 

of 
o* 



o o to 

o o t^ 



to 



to to 

O* CO 

O © 

r-TaT 

CO 



o o 
to o 

co~ 



^ -^ ® § © ^ 
. . . rt o w 

aT aT oT H * * 



H 



«2 S k 



.0 



»-5 



8 13 p£j ~ ~ 



03 03 03 



c3 c3 .. 

~& i3 "d r 



03 03 ti 

C"j Cj C3 

P3ffl« 



o o 

a a 

WP3 



■+J CO 

& °8 

03 rt 
-° S 

fH O 

03 rj 

KH 

of CO 
03 03 

Cj Co 

P5PP 



o 



«m~ 



<<gq 



03 c3 

~ CO 
03 03 

pqpq 



Prl ■+■-> +=> -4^> -t-3 

.rH 03 03 03 03 

- fafl bfi bfl b£ 

g^o o o o 
pqSSSS 



97 

OOOkOOiCOOOOCOWOCOOOHOOiOiOiON 
OCONCOCO^MOOHOC000510CO(MON(NGO 



HCOO 

^H O 



WCDHCO(NHN(NOWO 
t^^HCOCN*O^CDOOOqGO 
CO (M 



© 



oc © »o 

(M O t-h 

CD b- t>- 
CO 1>- 



o o 


o o o 


o o o o o o 


o 


o 




iO 


o o 


co>oo 


CO O iO O O iO 


iO 


LQ 




O 


^H t^ 


CO o »o 


N^OONQ 


!>- 


00 




CD 


h r^ 


CD CO 


"* ^H CD CD CN tJH 


cn 


CO 






o o 


© © © 


o o o o o © 


o 


© 




O 


o o 


o o o 


o o o o o o 


o 


o 




*o 


q. cd 


CO too 


co^ ©^ m ©^ ©^ iO 


LO 


tq^ 




iO 


r-4 l>T 


1 — 1 


TjT ^T io co~ of TjT 


CN 


co~ 






o o *o 


iooooiococoocoooh 


OOiOiOiON 


GC O 


^.^ 


CO t^ CO 


03CCOOGOOC550QOCD^IONNOO 


CN o 


1 — 1 


WOirH 


»0 CD CO <M CO CO r- I © i— It— i 


iO 


CN CN CO 


O b~ 


,-H 


CN 


H^COfM 


CM CO 




cn 


co r^ 






i— I 


CN 




o 
cnT 


tH 




O O O 


OOOOOtQiOOiOiOiOOOOOOO 


h © © 


o o *o 


lOOOOONNONMiOOOiOiOiOOO 


CO O O 


CONH 


^MOOMNHOHOO 


TfH 


CN CN © 


CD O 


i—l 
















CN 


H CO CO CN 


O CN 




CO 


© l> 






i—l 


CM 




00 

T— 1 


CO 





T3 
d 
CN 



M 
d 

£ a 

C3 Hi 

is 

CD CQ 

WW 



O ^ *H 

PQWPQ 



H 



lJ CD 
I— I 

>>^ 

S£ 

of of 
^^ 
o o 
o o 



T3 CD ^=5 ;z3 



o3 



wosr * 



fafi bJDi-D 

'3*3 "S 

£ £ § 

o o >> 

^H ^ ^ 



M 



-s d g o 
d ^ & 

S .sp.sp 8 



0< 



m 

8 d 
d d 



CD ^ ^ 

*-i c* rd 



w 



(Z5 OJ , 

CD CD r^H 

bJO bJD d 

u u u 

d d d 
WPQPQ 



3 



<3* 

d^ 



3£ 

si 

PQ-g 
^ d 



8 
d 

~ go 
^ °3 

1°. 

CD 

rd O 

m +s 

d d 
PQPQ 



W 



98 



Total Cash Tax 
on Personal 

and 
Real Estate 


iOOCOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOt-hOCOO*0000 
iQW03^00>OOOCOi0^iOiO^C005GOOCOCON 

NGOiOCO^CO^OOkONCOiOOiO^MOOOWH 
^C^COOi^H^OOHC^H ^t^^^cOCOCNC^tO 
H CO 



O o3 

ft* 



o o o o o o 


to 

00 


o 


i-H 00 t^ (M rfH CO 

^(N(N00^h 


o 

00 





oooooooooo 

lOiOO^HOOOiOO 
>OOicON^iO i— i CO "sH 

tO 




o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

OO^CO^tO to^o to 
CO~ CvT CsT !>■" TjT h 



o 
to 

CO 



o 
o 



oooooooooo 
oooooooooo 

lOiOO^r- i O O O to O 

^ co" co~ co~ >o" o~ r-T i— T rtT 

iO 



03 co 
03 O 08 

H 2 



lO O CO 00 o 
to to CO o o 



iO 



O to CO O 
OHCO to 



TjH t^ tO CO 

<«tf t-H H 



O^HOCOOtOOOO 

tJH o.oo ooocogon 

^OOOOiOOOON 



£ 3 £ ro 



o o o to o 

tO O CO (M O 

to t^ o 



o o t^ 

O to GO 

oco^ 



o 
o 
to 



OOOOOOtOO 

OT-HOcootocqo 

T^0000tOO00C01> 



T-l ^h 



O ^H 



a; tf g 



S a ° 



PQ 



CD CD 



S S §" 

O O M 

■+^ -t- 3 £3 
3 2 c3 

pqpqo 



£ CO 

CD f^ 
!=h CD 

W.S 

j=f ^ o o o o m 

• CD - 

g 55 



O^^H 



'^^fH^?HCD ^CD 



S S S S S 9 *J - 
'pVpVpVpVpVS.s 4S 

oooooooo 



C£ 






eg 03 

S £ 

^« 

. ~ s-l 

p g 

o o 

oo 



8.2 

<?3 k-H 

^^ 
• & CO 

§ s 

S a 
o o 

oo 



c3 



03 

a o 
o o 

oo 



99 

OOC0O00OOC0OOO00>O»O00OOOOOCCi0OO00O 
OOiOCDOOiO^O^^OOhCDOiOOONOCOOOO^OiO 

05CD05^iOHOCOCO^COHkO^(M(MHCONHOOiHOO»Oa5CD 
rH rH "^ C5 i— I t"^ CO rH COCOCOCOCDC^OOCO rH O CO CO rH 



o o o o o 


o o 


OOiOtOLOOO»OOOOOOOOiOO 


OOONOOO 


O 00 


^Oh(NNiOO(MiONOOCOOOMiOiO 


C5 CO l> "^H »0 


^ o 


HMH0003!N03NN 


rH CO CO 00 *0 iO CO 


l— 1 r- 1 T^ 00 


^ CO 


COCNCOCO^CNt+HCNI 
CO 


rH CO 


CO *0 rH 


o o o o o 


o o 


ooooooooooooooooo 


o o o o o 


o o 


oo*o»o*ooo*oooooo 


30100 


00 LO t> O 00 


O 00 


^O(NI>M0OMONOOC000(NOiO 














i— 1 1— i ^t 1 i>- 


Ttf <N 


w(MC^(N^c; 


1 rH Oq 

CO 


rH CO 


CO tO rH 


CO 00 O O CO o 


CO O O 00 


iO o 


CO *o 


CO 


Oi rH 


OPINIO 


CO »0 rh r^ 


t^ »0 


CO CO 


iO 


i— I OhcOiOO 


CO LO ^ CO 


rH lO 


CM rH 


CO 


rH 


rH (M rH 


T— 1 


CO 


^ 


rH 


iO >0 o o io o 


iO O O »0 


o o 


LO O 


o 


I>- <M O O t^ O 


t^ O O CN 


»0 O 


t^ to 


CO 


^H 050^^1^ 


iO iO rti <N 


CM »0 


00 rH 


CM 




HIM i-i 


rH 


CO 


CO 


rH 



J4 " m 
.g !»J 

03 03 <H 

bfibfig 
'g*E O 

M rH -4-3 
O O O 

ooo 



o 
O 



b id a) 

» rH JH 



rH O 

° b 

cu 03 



o 
O 

«e 

GO 

o 8>S 

^ H 9 

«s § £ 



<j S S o W M h5 ^ 

• - ffl 

CO r^ 

cq > O 
g 03 O 

O ^ rH 
OOO 



CO CO CO 

.9.S.S 

*co *co *co 

OOO 
OOO 



CO CO 

.S.9 

"co 'co 

O O 
OO 



WW 

GQ CD 

£ S O 

2 rC B"B 

--fL^ r-H 
-r» QC b£<^ 

■ CD -d -rH -r 

d 3 s.2 
d d d > 
d d d^ 
OOOQ 



• d 


o 


' 03 


GO 




h 


d 
d 1 ^ 

rd - 


CD 

w 


O 03 




•-S > 


1=1 


~r2^ 


rH ^3 


O 


CD rH 


— i 


d o 




dO 


CD 


03 CD 


CD 


QQQ 



O 

COr-H 1 

^o'g $ 

rO r— I 

H _^ 03 

"53 CD rd 
rd^O 

« .2 CD 

CD ^1 .rH 

bC^ d 

^ ^d 

^ CD d 

>> X -H 
r-3 S^ 

CD CD CD 



CO 

03 




Ph 


+3 


r*> 


O 


GO 

CD 

a 

t-3 


CD 

"4-3 
o3 


i, Robe 
Anthon 


03 T3 


M 


o 


^ 


a 


o 


<d~ 




H>3 


cd 


a 

o3 


bX 03 


0; 


Ph 


T3 


d,d 


CD 







O 


O 


QPPQP 



100 



fU OS'S 



-2 o 

o 



OOOtQLOOiO^OOOOOOOLO^i-OOOCQOOOO 
cOcDHOcOHi0^cONOOiONl>^iO>PWO^»0 

NN^NIOCOOOOOO(NOOO(NCONNOONHIOCO 
HHCOH^(NHCOCOCC(N(MCO OWW(N(M(NH 

1— I T— I T— I 1-H TjH T— I 



03 °5 
O <£ 



O 



CO 



OOOiOOiOOOOOO^OOOOOOOOO 

OMO^OOcDOOOiOCOCOOkCiOINOOiO 

(N^TfHOCOOiOO(N^OOHCOiONOOCDH(NcO 
(NHrt((MH(NW^(NOirO O (M W ^ (N (N h 



P5 



o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 
o © o o »a o »o O O O O O iC o 

i-h~ c<fr4*-HH~T-?©~o~co~(^c>f aTco" 



o o o o o o o 
© o o o o o o 

O^ iO^ iO <N^ ©^ ©^ O 



03 O CJ 



OOOidO^OiOO 

1— I © T— IJ>.CO©*n>^ 



t-H t^ (M (M t-H H 



TjH 



oo 



O rH t-H 



© 
© 


© tJH iT5 

i-l T« <^H 


T-H 


00 


CO 


H CM 

CO 


00 
CO 


CO 



03 w 03 03 

ss|3 

bfl-3 2 to 



©©©©©©©© 10 

OOOiQiOO^OO CM 

HCOH(NHr- 1 THH © 



© 
© 
© 



© © © 
© r^ iO 



© 

*°~ 
CM 



CO 



^ ^ S 

> <d o 

"t 3 ~£ _£ ^ 
^^ 2 H 

o o o o 
QQPA 



o 

O <D 
-4-s i— < 

o3 ^3 
WW 



H«0 



T3 f= 

^-< £_l rH 

s s s 

jr t3 <d 

CD cj oj 

1> fc! fc 

> 03 03 



M CD 

o3 o3 
03 03 






o3 

%'£ 

o3 o3 

?« 

o3.£_ 

fe fx< pEH fe PH Ph 



T3 

- £ 

~ o ^3 



b£ 



pq 



c3 

fH 
rd 



CO 



£WHO 






c3 



<D .S .S 



p^ pL^ pE* ^ ptj 



<D 



101 

O0i»OOOOOOOOO(X)Oc0OOCOC^W00O»O00 
iOWCOHNOWNHCOHOiOCC(M(MW(MOO(MOCOOOOH 

00 O »0 rtOOHH^OO^OOO^ 0(M ^(NMO CO 

t— I 00 O i—l i— li— It— It— I O "^ 

r-T LO~ 



o 


oooooooooo 




o o o 


O O O rH lO O 


o 


HNOCON 


t-h O O 00 lQ 




(NOC 


00 rH O O CO <N 


iO 


HOO^^OOLOONOfM 




(NOW 


00 rH NOH 


iO 


CD 


t-H TJ-I t— 1 t— I 


^NthH^oc 




CO (N 


<M (M CD 


CO 






T-H T-H 






CM 




o 


oooooooooo 




o o o 


o o o*ooo 


o 


oooooooooo 




o o o 


O O OLOiOO 


o^ 


HhOCCN 


H Q CO 00 lO 




<N O O 


OOH O ^ rH 


CSl 
















io 


rH T* rH t— 1 


^ iO h CQ N 




CO <N 


O <M iO 


CO 


rH 




T— 1 T-H 






<N 




OOiiO 


o 


OOiO 


•~ 


o o o 


O 'CO oo »o 


CO 


iO CO CO 


o 


OiON 


cc 


<N CO ■ (M 


rH CO CO 00 


o 


OOiC 


CO 


CO l> co 


co 


LO CO 03 


CO 00 rH CO 


rH 


i— i Ci »0 


^ 


<N rH 


T 


CO 


oq C3 




00 o__ 


1—1 




tH 




r- rh 




t— r 










to" 




O O i-i 


o 


o o o 


co 


o o o 


O CO *o o 


iO 


OOi^ 


o 


o o oo 


CO 


o o o 


CO CO (N *0 


!> 


lO^Oi 


o 


COlOt* 


CO 


CNCCM 


»0 O rH CO 


T-H 
















t— 1 t-H LQ 


CO 


<N T-H 


CO 


CO 


O 00 




00 O 


T— 1 




— 




CQ CO 
iO 





72 
cd a? 

CD CD 
72 72 



cd cd cd p^ 



G ^ c3 

s a a 2 
,&,&,£? - 

■p +j -p ^ 
c3 c3 c3 



^ s 

M o;h1 

C3 SH X 

h§oo 



<1 CD 

d f-t 

H o 



^ 72 



OO 



S © 32 cd 03 

•--i _C CD ^-( 



£ d & 



£^ 



s &£h 



CD CD qj 
bJO cJD-g 

Q O o3 



s3 



CD £h 
? Oh £ 

H rj N 

- CD CD 
■P -P -P 
i=l fl CJ 



fl ^ ^ S c3 



.. o 

cc > c) 

© c3 5 ^2 

2;_C3C3C3C303CD 



rH £_| J_| J>~s ?h 



CD CD /-s 

of of G 

<D CD c3 

bC bfl 3 
T3 ^ ^ 

o o o 



H 



e3 



03 



72 

~ ~ „ fl 

72 72 r-< O 

CD CD S3 72 

fl G 72 fl 

>» ^ GpG 

o3 c3 CD O 

"^ r-2 r-^ r^, 



O 

G - 
fl rG 

o.S. 

G«1 

o ^ 

2 02 
G CD 

pG rt 
o o 

r-3 r-^ 



102 



a °s 

.fl O to 

3g « 



^OOO^HOOOOOOiOr^cOiOOOtOOOOO^hO 

HCON(NHTj<kCH0005WCDC0030HCONCOO^OO 

HCONNO)iOkOC0050QWOOCOHCOHHN(NNH 
t^C^ COOOi-h C^ t— IN r-i i-H <M i— l CM lOH^N^ 



H 5 

CO 



OOOOOOOOOOlOOOOOO 

OOONHiO^iOOOOOJWNCDHOH 



0(MN^NiCiO(M0005CONCOHCO 
CO <M CO GO t-h Nh(M i-i tH CQ i-i O* 



O O O O O 

OCONOO 



tJH t^ O CD CO 
t^ ^h rJH CD CO 



$3 3 



oooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooo^oooooo 

OOONhi0^i00000500(NcDhOh 



(N (N 



CO 



<N H <M 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

OONO O^ 

TjTr-Tco^oco" 






^H GO 

CO CO 



O ^H 



^ o 

i— i CD 



CO CD 



^ CO LO 
TH 1> 00 



CO 



to o 

CD t^ 



^H 1>- 






H H 00 



fcfl— 2 CO 



Ttn oq oo o 

O H (M CD 



o 


coo 


o o 


o o o 


o 


t^ CD *0 


iO o 


GO 'nH O 


T— 1 


CO 


i-H r^ 


HO00 



o 


rCj 


PI 


O 


CD »-3 


bf 




d 


*H 


w 


0) 

p3 






03 


zzj 


00 


03 



M 



CD -^ 

h O » 

S»-5 o 

§ S3 

CD CD .£h 

WWW 



I— 1 CD 

-g ^ CD 

N 03 G 

SO c8 

H ^ 

b£ 03^ 



P3 

GO " 

d * 
dS 

03 O 



d d 

o o 

d d 

d d 

CD CD 



o 



03 *-. 
n, 03 

do 

o ^ 

^ s 

CD d 



d 

d "o 

^ CD* 

jp 03 

£ § 



d 

CD 



13 :«! 



O 



= CD d 
d bJD'^3 
d Jh tn 

^ j% > 



d 
d-^3 

03 03 



d co J 

*M ~f> CD 
<1WPH 

o o o 



103 



OOCOOOOOIOGOO>OHM 



r^ooooiooooioio 



GO © 


CO CM CO CO 


t* ^h 


T— | 


CO CO 


lOOCOOM 


to © CO 


© 


T-H ^ 




O CO t-h 


CO O t-h 


^ 


iOHN(N<N 


l-O *0 




(M 


to 












CO 


TH t-H 
1 — 1 








© o 




o 


O iO o o o 


o 


o o o o 


© 




© 


<M O 




CO 


o 10 »o LQ o 


o 


O I>- to © 


^ 




© 


CO »o 




CM 


,_H 


t^ tH 


rH 


to 


O GO CO (M 


© 




<N 


i—i GO 




© 


T-H 


<N O 


T-H 


N 


T-H T-H t-H (N 


iO 




<M 


CO 








T-H 




<M 


" 








O O 




o 


o o o o o 


o 


o o o o 


© 




© 


O O 




o 


o *o o o o 


o 


o o o o 


© 




© 


oq o 




CO 


o 


io»oo 


o 


O 1> ^0 o 


rh 




© 
























t-H 1Q 




© 


T-H 


<N © 


T-H 


iO 


OHri(N 


to 




oq 


CO 












CM 


T-H 








© © © © 




o o 


GO 


to 


t-H CO 


!>• O O 


iO © 


© to >o 


IOHCOCO 




iO <N 


GO 


lO ^ T— t 


O O t^ 


*0 © 


CO iO © 


iO ^o 


co 




CO (N 


CO 




CO t-H 


iO ION 


iO 


CO 


«tf 


LQ 






CO 






N 


iO *o 


lO 




















T-T 








o o o o 




to © 


to 


O O CO 


© o © 


© © 


© © © 


O O © O 




^ o 


<N 


lO t-H CO 


n © © 


iO © 


© 


to o 


lO H 


CO 




O <N 


CO 




CO ^H 


<N © b- 


©^ 


CO 


^ 
























^H 






CO 






CO 


(N iO 


»c 






rH 














CO 









r-H 
03 ^»r— 1 

C3 fi rj 

*H 

.1— t O ~ 

^H O 0-> 

PQ fa/3 W) 

~ do c3 

OOfn 



Ph'Ph' 



5p4 



a a |m 

03 O 3 „ 

of oT qT 2 
bJO bC bfl £ 
03 03 03 03 
Ph Ph Ph P-i 



o 

Si 

3£ 



03 03 

o o 

PH # *H 

*<3 *03 

PhPh 



a ^ 



CD 



£ o 



CD 



03 3 
03 hG 



W^ 



.S2 G -' 

^G j3 ^ 

. . o , 

03 »2 03 
Sh _£ Ph 

Ph Ph Ph Ph Ph ^ 



03 03 'g 
PPG 



PH 

03 

^-dpq HH 

G ^ rM 

rt 03 H r~ 
03 ~ 03 

ffi Ph Ph Ph 



PQ 






ro 


a 


O 


r^ 


JH 




03 


izj 


4h 


^ 


o 




© 


&vg 


03 


-3 






PhPh 



^5 Id 

03 s 

bJO 03 

PPW 

CJ o 
03 03 
O O 

P^P4 



Ph 

fl 03 

-IS 

*\* 

^§ 

o o 

o o 

p^p^ 



104 



O£o3 



OOiOOOiOiOCOMO'OHtOOOMOO^OOiO 
OOOOOHHCOI>N(X)WcO"OiO^(NHOOOO(M^ 

HOcOOii-OGOOONi-OOOHH^NcOHIMWLOCOCDCO 
MHQO(NCD(MHHCOCOO(MCO(M(MCC (M H CO ^ ^ 

t— It— ICD^Hr- 1 Ol i — It — I i— I 



SS « 

E- t 

O «3 

(H « 



o 

o 



CO 
CM 



o o o o o o 

O lO CD tQ LQ to 

lOHNcOQCO 
cONhht^ O 
h (N 



OOOOOOOOOO 
OiOO»OWHMiO(NiO 



cot^aot^<NcoTtiocooo 

CO <M 00 (M (NrH^hrtHcO 



~o3 O-S 



o 
o 
o 



o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

OiOcD»OiOiO 



t-H lO CO H H ^ 00 

<N T— I T-H 



OOOOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOOOO 

O^O^tO^ rH CO IO^<N^lO 



C gs 



o O iC o 

o o o o 
t— i o to o 

t-h t-h rfi ^ 



lOiCCOO^OiOHiO 
CO iO 00 (N (N GO M CO 



co 

to 



CO tO rH t-H 
t-h CO O (M 



O CO 

to oa 



00 
CO 



^ o 

tO CO 



rH Tt< 



iO 
OS 



TjH 






o o o o 
o o to o 

t-h^ o" h aT 

t-H t-H tH CO 



oototooooo 

»OiONNOiOHiO 
H ^(M(MOH 



iO 



rH CO O tH 



O IO 

o b- 

iO t-H 

co" 



o o 

rJH O 

t-H CO 



o 

to 



CU 

x & 






JddS 

pj • Og ?h H M 

.h ri ^ ^ ^r T 

„ ^ „ „ „>-3 

m m w. w. m 

CD CD CD CD CD 02 

p H Ph Ph Ph 0* co 

o o o o o 3 



oj 



rH O 
Ph*Ph* 



»H pJZ| ?i Sh cu 

c3 o o o cd 



go 

< h - h" <i I 

?h CU CU H r -!-H 

J '3*3 8jq| 



ph- g 



Sh 



£ <3 






t% 



fl f=j a s fl fl a 

c3 c3 cd c3 c3 c3 



, a sj3 a a a g 

CUCUCUCUCUCUCUCUCU 

mmmmmmmmm 



105 



IOHOOO05W0COCHM 
CONiO»OHCO(N0500005 



1-1 t^ t^. 1-1 
00 (N 00 



CDCDOON^HCO 

T^ i-H l> ^h r-i t>. 

^1 c l rH 

CO r-T 



GOlNHNGOOOOCOiOHCO 

NCDCONCOHCDCOOONGOO 
NiOOtO HO00W00H 
(M CO O »0 io t-h 



»0 0500 


o 


o o 




o 


o 


O O iO o 


CD CO tO tO 


o 


to o 




00 


o 


iO to i—l CO 


H(MNH 


1> 


Gi Tfi 




00 


o 


NH00CO 


00 (M 00 


00 


Th ^ 




i-H 


CM 


CM 00 1— i 


i— I 


1— 1 






1— 1 


<M 


i— | 


o o o o 


o 


o o 




o 


o 


o o o o 


lOQOO 


o 


o o 




o 


o 


o o *o o 


H^kO»0 


o 


>o o 




00 


o 


to to CO CO 
















N(MO 


b- 


^ ^ 




o 


o 


(NCDH 










1—1 


(N 


i-H 


CM 


OOiC^OOO 


i—l CO 


^Oi-HiOiOOOOO^O 


CO 


HC0(MO5>O 


O Ci 


OO^HNOOOOO 


H O 


to 


HQCOQ0N 


i—l CO 


N iO WNCC 


i-H CO CO 


i-H CO 


o 


tO 


i-H <N 


i—i b- 


C^COOiO 


i—l 00 00 




i> 


© 

co~ 




i-T 


<N <N O 


<N »0 




o 


OcOiOiOO 


O <N 


COOOOOOOOOO 


CM 


OiMCOMO 


1— 1 1—1 


i-HOi-H»0»OOOOOiO 


H 


T-H 1—1 


ONiO 


05 00 


t^^HO(MCOOOO 


i—l to 
















tH 


00 


i-i CN 


i— ( iO 


O i— I CO iO 


i-H CO CO 




CO 


1> 




Ci i— H 


<M (M t^ 


<M »0 





r/i 



QQ 

'53 

r3 



fe JS wis 

?3 3 § 

02 -»-=> +s -t-i 






S -' 02 «* ^ rZ 1 



a 2 






cSod 

^ ^ d of CD 



bJO bJD>-3 o o 

i — i ! — i -+f cd o 
^ 2 5 ^3 03 



D o o o g 



cu2 

T3 cp 
3c£ 



22 

cdca 

O O 

o o 



£ 8 



£h 



oo 



K>i >^> >} >i 

CD CD CD CD 

?H fH ^H *H 

o o o o 

+3 .+» >4^ -+J 



CD CD 

bJD bJO 

t*< b b 

3 ° ° 

03 CD CD 

k 03 03 03 






^ cd r «r . * 

^^S S CD 

o3 03 o !>> >^ 



106 



,0 o -2 

o w 
H 



OOOOt^OOOOi-HOOOJOOt^OOOOtOOtQ 
lOHOiOOOiONOHiO^iocDHMM^OOW 

Q(N(NHCOOOiOQHOOO(MO>OHN(NHOO 
NHIMNGOOO to t* iO CO CO O CO (M i— I <N t^ (N 
CO i— l rH (M t— I 




OOOOOOOO 

»OHOiOiOO»ON 



OHINNNOO CO 



O O iO O 



00 !>» rH 00 
CO (N lO TtH 



O O O O to 
iO O to to (M 



N lO O H GO 



OOOOOOOO 
OOOOOOOO 
iOHOiOiOO>ON 

<^T-Tcf cocf oo of 



o o o o 

O O to o 



o o o o o 
o o o o >o 

»00»OiON 



CO(M^rh (MiOHCD 



+3 


o 


t^ 


00 i-l 00 


totoi>»ooootooo 


3 « 


o 


tO 


O O H 


OiCO(NH(N(NOiCOH 


H W 


tO 


tO 


O H O 


r^QNrH t^ ^ CO (M 


^oia 


t^ 


to 


(Mt^iO 


T-H tO T— 1 


3 § 


<m 




1-H <N 




H 2 










Ph 










So"3 o 


o 


<N 


tO O tH 


OOOOtOOOOO 


S.© 9"eS 


o 


tO 


(M i-H ^ 


tOtOt^O(MOtOOO 


0>.2 in la 


o 


o 


00 00 t> 


tH 00 to i— I (N TJH CO i— I 


<5 


to 


tO 


H(N(N 


rH tO t-H 


<m 




H <N 





SJ 



, : go 



03 





2 


w 


CO 


„, 


p. 


*H 


PI 


03 


o 


d 


02 


m 


+-) 


c3 


C3 



££ 



_g . fl 

'BrG O 

K! r-H 05 

C3 03 03 



03 



?H *H 



* C§ g g 



© & ?h c£ 



d> r^t ^H 






03 



03 

m h fl 



03 <I 



o 

'o '© -rj 
03 03 ^j 






~ ^ J_| *H 

fl 03 03 03 

9 "o F o "cS 

"g 03 03 03 
03 j3 _C{ pCj 



^ fH lH ^ fH 

03 03 05 03 03 



03 03 03 03 03 
03 03 03 03 03 






So s 

rg O) 



107 






g g 



^OOO00OcD^»O(M>C^ 
OiOO»OOOOGOcOH(NN^ 



(NiO^iOHCDHtNN 



CN 1-1 



OiOiOOOOWiO 
OOOOiOCOCiCD 



OHH00O5C0HH 
LO CO ^ 





-^ O O O 




o 


TtH iO (M 


lO Tt< 




lOiOOOOCOiO 




CONOID 




o 


cOHcqN^ 




CD CD O >0 CO O CD 




(M LQ TH lO 




O 


(N t^ 


CM r-\ 




HH00OWHH 


t * 


TjH 




CD 




T— 1 




CO Th 


















0) 


o o o o 




O 


o o o o o 




o o o o o »o o 


"S °-g 


TfH O O O 




O 


^iO(N»0^ 




iQiOOOOMO 


m»H 


^ioo»o 




o 


(N CD 


CN O 




HHOlOMHH 




rH" 




CD 




1 ~ l 




of ^T 


















<B 




oo 


CD 






O 




a 1 




00 


00 






o 




EH flW 




i-H 


T— 1 






o 




3°* 

O 






Oi 






iO 




f-H o 
















tH 
















V 
















PM 
















oj tw _ 




r— 1 


T-H 






CD 




i! § 5 




t^ 


IO 






tH 








H 


CO 
00 














d^ 

o3 r 



H CO 
d CD 

^ d 

<1«h 



d ' 

o : 

CO rj 
M CO 

&PQ 

co r 
d o 
£0 



^Ph"3 



■+3 

CD 

d * 
d 

CD 



5 £ 

CD O 



pqpqpqcqw 



PQ 



. . d 
. . o 

^ d CD bJO^ 



d 
o 
-■-=> 

CO 

O 

PQ 



£ g^ d 



x 



« <! -§, - J 

CO CO rd H H 

o o d F £ 
o o o o o 

h 'h h ^ In 

pqpqpqpqpq 



a 

<4 



CO 



?h A3 Jr. 



,H§ 



CD r X ^ 
Ph VI " 

CD 



> 

U 

CD 

S 
o 



Ph co o ^pq 

"P Ph 2 CD 

^ n -^ bC 






co • 
^P^ 



§^ S.d^ o 

oSoooo 



cd 

*H ^ 

CD ^ 

d^ 
d^ 
d d 



CD 



fc! 

d 

O 



108 



^ 9 -2 

O <» a — 
o o ^ 



OOOOOC0OOO»0 

OONN>OOCOHO)(M 



OOCOOLOOOOOOOO 
CD^CO»OH05HONOO 



tQcONNiOWOHOSN 


OHIO 


i— 1 Ci rH rH OS C<1 t-H 


CO CD iO 


I>~ »0 


LO HC^C^H 


r-H H 


CO 


rH 



AM 

.o 






O O O O 
o o t^ t^ 



OCONN 

CO CD 



CO O O O 

OCDHOi 



CO ZD r-4 CF> 



ocoo>oo 

WHOIOH 
GOHM rH 

CO *0 
CO 



O O O O O 

rH O t» O O 



r-< O) C<1 y—i 
HC^MH 



Mp> 03 



o o o o 
o o o o 
o.cn> i>> 

»0~cO~ 



iO o o o 
I> o o o 

(MCOHC55 



o o o o o 
O CO o to o 
(MHO ^ 



CO 



03 

CO 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

rH ©1> O © 

r-rc^rc^TrH" 



o 

lO 



*o 



lO 
H 



00 
H 



o 

CO 



cq CO 



C5 
© 



© 
iO 






o 
o 

iO 



on 


»o 


o 


LO 


co 


oq 


o 


H 


*o 


c<i 


CO 


»o 



-H 



-^ 



I 

„ I 
« I 
I I 

el 
o 



o 

o«^ ro 



o 



03 3 



^d ^3 03 >> *jj r • 

03 
03 

a; 'a? o b'2 5 

QPPPHW 



T3 

O 

o 

a. 

O 

O 

° s 

02 O 
.£h A 

03 o 

baf ^ 



ph 1 



;p 



0- M 

h *h d 

03 X © 

O H += 

^r^ 
"£ rH 

pq o c 



.sU^ 



002 



SH 5H 

o o 



bJOr^ 03 H 
2 >>* 



•tf 



O - 

02 5h 
^h 03 

03 *H 

a § 



Ph 2 °8 

K« S rt ^ 03 

b/D 03 o !-h 

IlllrS 



o 

m 
O 

.PQ 

OJ3. rg 

§ °H pq 

g <& a? J? 

Fh zj .nH H 

Ph 03 g rCj 

fH O O 

. oTO hH "-3 

03 ^ r 

fa § §£ 

2 cp <d rS 

O h in ^ 

oooo 



oW 



■ ^ ^ 

H-3 O 

03 s r 

03 ^ d) ^ 
^ r^ ^.03 

^ O ^rH 

JS2 ^"03 o 

JH ^ H-3 > 

• H ^ M l> 

03 03 03 

owww 



109 

COiOiOOOOOiOOCOOiO>OOOiOOOOiOGONOOiOiO 
NNHTjHcOiOiO(NHO(N(NcDOOiOW(NOCOHH(MiONO 



H(M(MCOCON 


<N (M 


lOOOOOONiO W(N 


i-i OS (M 


MOCOH 


r-l t— 1 


<N 






tO 






r-H 


i-H CS| 


T-H 00 


CO 














i— 1 




(N 


cototooootoo 




O iO 




o 


OOOOtOOb-OOOtO 


NNHOCOiOiO(N 




O <N 




CD 


OCO(MOCO»OH 


(M iO »0 CO 


H(N(NHCON 


<N 




LO 00 




CO 


OS CO (N 


HQkO 


<N CO O rH 


r— 1 t-H 


(M 






to 






Cs 


1—1 


H 00 


CD 


















<N 


OOOOOOOO 




o o 




o 


ooooootooooo 


COtOtOOOOtOO 




O to 




o 


o o o o *o O i-i 


O O O iO 


H(NCOOCO»0 


e<j 




O b- 




CD 


OCONOOOiO 


MlOOH 






















>0 i-l 


C<l 






tO 






OS 


1—1 


i— I to 


tO 


















CM 


O 00 






CO 




LC 




OS O 


00 ' 


to 


O tH 






1— 1 




(N 




00 tO 


CO 


t> 


tH (M 






CI 




oo 




b~ CD 


CO 


<M 


to 














r—l 


T-H 





O to 


^ 


o 


00 o 


O <N 


OS 


to 


r^ O 


O (N 


1—1 


l> 


b- to 



CO 

to 



o 
to 



T3 

• O 

• o 

• p 
go P • § 

^^^ oPQ . 

pq bjo £? roo 

IP (H M „. " CD 

•* p o o ^ 
c3 cu -rn rp P ^ 

K H M WW^ 



CD O 



p 

o 

-J-3 

m 
T3 O 

rH CO 

O^ 

o g 

'53 



5 S 

GO O 
O P 
O 

O 



P3 



2^ 









73 " 
CD O 

yAyA 



o 

■+3 't\ 

CD c3 
o^ 

go 



p 
o 

+3 

02 
O 

PQ 
^ p r 
o 2 p 

; d rP rH 



J W0 

-rSS 

rH ^ 

T3 . -^ 






2"2 

rP O 

CD O 

rO 

W r 
cdW 

IS 

cd~ cd~ 

rH rH 
O O 
O O 



P 

• o 

' 5 

;"S 
■ 3** 

. rH rH 

. O TJQ rH 

CD w O 

rH ^W^ 



CD 



CD "Tj 

. 02. >. • 

r 03 C^r-;^ 

P=H P P r ^^ 
. O CD H . 

H ^ W k-«H 



d 
o 

■+3 
02 

CD 
"HrS 

o r 
o ^ 
P ™ 

CD 7^ 

2 S 



o • 






bJ0 L 

^ CD ^ P _T 



O 

rH rH r> t> ?H 

■"^ <-* CD CD O 



CD 
P^ P 



^ s 

rnrCl 

PhPh 



110 



M 




o^ooor^oooo 


0000000000000*0 


Hrf 


<c 


ON^CDNO 


HO(N 


00 000»0»OCoiOI>H 


O CO CO 






iO CO CO CD 


CM 


HHIM 


o 


N00C5H 


00 i—t rH CM CO t— 1 


Sg-oH 


>0 (M (N 


CM 


T— 1 


GO 


t^ CO t^ 


CO *0 


CM 


O o 


a 


T— 1 






to 


^H 






5c 
o o 












T— 1 







O "3 



oooot^oooo 

OiO^ONOHO(N 



iO *0 CO CO 

»0 rH CM 



CM rH ^h CM 

CM rH 



OOOOOOOOOOOOiO 

OOOiOOCoiONHOOCO 

NOOHHGOHH(NCOH 

1> CO ^H CO lO CM 



M., bo 



ooooooooo 
oooot^oooo 

OlC^CO O rH O CM 



ooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOOOiO 

OIOOHIQNHOCOH 



iO O CM 



CM rH 



NCOH 
CO 



CO tH 



CM 




iO 
CM 



00 



o 

00 

o 

00 



o 

iO 



CO 



o 



o 
o 
oq. 

cm" 

iO 



o 
o 

coT 



a; . 

5 « 

£ o 

_Q -4-= 

rt P bJD 

^ <-d *rH 






^w; 






CD a3 
bJDHH 



c3 of of ^ g 
S 



H o3 • 

rP ^2 ' 



CD H 

+3 O 

2 S| 



s«-„~s 



» 



H^^ 



a ^ Whigo 



CD -+3 -+J 

P3 P3 Pn Pn 33 a5 GG ro 



CD c3 

8q 



P-ip§ 

^h CD 



CD CD -P- , 
O O O^ 



CD t-i 

° 5 
ggggHgggggq 



U 



.T3 

. O 

CD 

: a 

. o 

d°. 

O «*H 

•+J o 

""» -4-3 

O „ 

b * 

o o 
mm 



•_^^r^ r^t? 

fl g o £^J3 

O S 02 .3" <3 ^3 

.^r"^m-% g 

g fl fl g S J 

^ o o^ x± M 

cd S S ?h aT^ 

0) o oow^ 



Ill 



OOlOOOOOOOOO 

COOCOOh^OOhiO 

NNOJ(NH^(MHHCO 
l> ^h C3 CO 1-1 

CO t-h 



o 


tOOOOOOOOO 


o 


COOt— i^fOOi— iiO 


o 


0<Mt^t^C<J^t-hcO 


CO 


CM CO rH 


CO 


" 


o 


ooooooo^o 


o 


^OOOOOOOCN 


o 


OOOH^OOHCO 






o 


CN Oq ^h 


CO 





o o 

CO CO 






o o 

o o 

CO o 



■^ cd 

f-i CO 

c3 CD 



CD 

bJD 

^ O 
£5 c3 o 

CO ~ ?H 



CD 



CO ^ 



C 

u 

PI 

o 

O 

£ 0) 

CO & 

CD ,-3 ^Cj ^ r^H r^H 



05 
CD JD Jh -. 

'a; 'as Id ,2 

CD CD CD .Th 



PI 

o 

^'* 

rH CD 



^tf 



££££££££[*£ 



112 



WATER COMMISSIONERS REPORT 

The Water Commissioners herewith present their 
Annual Report: — 

The work of the year has been of a routine nature, 
no new work having been done. 

The repairs on the pipe system and at the Pumping 
Station have been made under the direction of the 
Superintendent. The Commissioners have endeavored 
to keep the expenses at a minimum during the year, and 
some work as the survey and plans of the last extensions 
have been allowed to go over into next year. There are 
no outstanding bills. 

The receipts for the past year have been about $400 
less than last year, owing to the fact that the railroad 
took about S600 less water. 

The records of the Venturii Meter at the Pumping 
Station show that about 5,000,000 gallons less water 
was pumped than last year, in spite of the fact that more 
water was wasted this year than ever before. 

There were so many complaints about rusty water 
that during the months of March, April and May, at 
the suggestion of the State Board of Health, the Super- 
intendent spent several days during each month going 
from place to place blowing off the water at hydrants 
and blow-offs, which accounts for the large consumption 
during those months, but it is interesting to note that 
these months, with the exception of July, were the only 
ones during the year when the consumption was equal 
to the corresponding months of 1912. 

Last year we called attention to the matter of instal- 
ling an electric pump, but as no : Article was inserted in 
the Warrant, nothing was done about it. 



113 

We wish again to urge upon the Town the advisability 
of such a pump and strongly recommend that provision 
be made for procuring the money for it. The necessity 
of having a pump of this type was brought forcibly to the 
attention of the Commissioners, when some much needed 
repairs at the pumping station were being made last 
Summer, and the water in the reservoir became very low. 

As reported by the Town Treasurer last year in the 
Profit and Loss Account of the Water Works under 
Liabilities, there has been paid into the Water Works' 
Treasury from direct taxation: — 

The Special Sinking Fund of, $2,311 47 

And Town Loan, 2,476 04 



Making a Total of, $4,787 51 

Mention is made of this amount in order that it may 
be on record, so that in the future, if the Town so desires, 
and the financial condition of the Water Works so admit, 
the money may be returned to the Town Treasury. 
The validity of the bond issue, voted at the last Annual 
Town Meeting, was questioned by many of our citizens, 
and on a petition of ten tax payers, the matter was taken 
before Mr. Justice Bailey of the Supreme Court, who 
granted an injunction against the issue and the case was 
carried to the full bench of the Supreme Court by the 
Committee on Claims and has been argued, but no de- 
cision has been rendered at the writing of this report. 
We believe the Town cannot afford to impair its credit 
by issuing any bonds about which there is the least 
suspicion. 

We wish again to call the attention of the Town to the 
uncollected water rates amounting to $956.57, or about 
7% of the full year's rates, and while the Commissioners 
have had the power to force payment or shut off the 
water, it seemed best, owing to the stringency of the time, 
to allow more leeway this year. We believe, however, it 



114 

is unfair to the majority of the water takers that the 
delinquents should have the use of this money instead 
of paying their bills when due. 

Meters 

There has been considerable agitation among some of 
our citizens as to the advisibility of the Town adopting 
the meter system for its water w T orks, and it has been 
hinted that the present Water Board is responsible for 
the present high water rates. It should be remembered 
that the enlargement of the water system has taken 
place under the Fixture Rate and would not have been 
made under a meter system, as under such a system 
each extension would have borne its own total expense. 

Under the present system the guarantee is simply 
for a certain per cent of the cost, for five years. 

Foreseeing the present conditions, in 1911, at the 
Annual Meeting, the Chairman of the Water Board 
warned the Town that if the policy of extensions and 
bond issues were continued, the time was not far distant 
when the works would cease to be self-supporting. 

The water system in a Town like Lincoln should be 
treated in a broad, general way as taxes, for the good of all 
of its citizens and we are glad this Town has so regarded 
it in many of the extensions, when only a small guarantee 
but little more than the interest on cost of construction 
has been required. 

In one instance, the extension from Wheeler's lane to 
the State Highway, no guarantee was required, while it 
cost over $6,300, and has never been a source of much 
revenue, nevertheless we think the Town pursued the 
right policy, because by so doing the whole of the north 
part of the Town is supplied with water. 

We heard of but two reasons why meters should be 
installed. 



115 

First, the individual making the claim would pay less 
for water used and 

Second, that it would be more equitable. 

In answer to the first reason, we have to say that the 
water works have not been receiving more money than 
was needed to run the works. 

If everybody who wants meters is to pay less than 
they have been paying, who is to make up the deficit? 

We have yet to hear of any one who advocates meter 
rates, who expects to pay more for water than he has 
been paying. It is always someone else who uses more. 
No one should be deceived by the argument that under 
the meter system one simply pays for what he uses 
and the cost is determined by dividing the total cost 
of running the works by the number of gallons of water 
pumped. Such is not the case. We are told by a 
competent engineeer that this Town would do well 
under a complete meter system, if we sold one half of 
the water pumped. 

One of the towns near Boston, having a complete 
meter system and no reservoir, the water being taken 
directly in the main from the Metropolitan System, 
sold only 66f % of the water bought. 

With the small population supplied, about 1,000, and 
the long lines of pipes (about 25J miles) there must of 
necessity be a large waste of water to keep the pipes clear. 
Under the meter system, for a time, the waste would be 
greater, owing to the restricted use. 

In answer to the second reason, "that it would be more 
equitable." 

In 1905, the Town had a Comptroller of the Water 
Works and he employed Mr. Leonard Metcalf of Concord 
as an expert engineer. 

Mr. Metcalf was furnished with every detail that could 
be obtained in regard to the works, and his report to 
the Water Board was that the Town could not instal a 



116 

complete meter system and pay its bills unless the 
minimum rate should be fixed at $23.00. 

What would this mean to the Town? 

That ^the one who now pays $10.00 would be obliged 
to pay $23.00. 

Who would profit by the change? 

Not the Town as a municipality, for it would cost more 
to run the works under the meter system. Not the one 
who now pays $10.00, for he would pay $23.00. Not the 
one who now pays $23.00 for his rate would remain the 
same. The persons benefited would be those who now 
pay large rates and those who use water only a part of 
the year, and these amount to 5 % of all the number of 
services. As the larger part of the expenses of the works 
consisting of Sinking Fund, Interest and Bonds continues 
during the whole of the year (in 1912 these amounted to 
7/11 of the total expenditures) it seems right that those 
who use the water only in the Summer, when the cost 
is the greatest, should pay their proportion of these 
expenses. The inequalities which exist under the present 
system are in favor of the small takers. 

We believe the present water rates should be reduced 
as soon as possible and believe it can be done in this way. 
At the present time the Town pays $15.00 each for 
hydrant service ; the average'of the'State is about $25.00. 
If the additional $10.00 iper hydrant Vere assessed it 
would yield $1,220 more for the works. 

The personal property holder and the non-resident 
tax payers are indirectly benefited by the water works, 
and we see no reason why they should not contribute 
something to its support. 

In addition to this amount, the last of the series of 
$1,000 bonds due each year will be paid, Dec. 1, 1914. 
The expenses, therefore, for 1915 will be reduced to 
that extent. 

We believe substantial reductions can be made in the 



117 



present rates in 1915, and this will prove to be more 
satisfactory to the Town in the long run than any meter 
system. Appended are the usual statistics. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 
JOSEPH S. HART, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Water Commissioners. 



118 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING FEBRUARY i, 1914. 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 

General Statistics 

Population by census of 1910, 1,175. 
Date of construction, 1874. 
By whom owned, Town. 
Source of supply, Sandy Pond. 
Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon, Cross compound Fly Wheel 
Pump, 12" and 20|" x 5| " x 12". 
Description of fuel used. 
Kind, hard and soft coal. 
Brand of coal, Lackawanna, New River. 
Average price of hard coal per gross ton, delivered, $7.50. 
Average price of soft coal, per gross ton, delivered, $5.91. 
Percentage of ash. 
Wood, price per cord, $5.50. 
Coal consumed for the year in pumping, 
Pounds of wood consumed, equivalent amount of coal, 
Total equivalent coal consumed for the year, 388,340 lbs. 
Total pumpage for the year, 75,817,500 gallons. 
Average static head against which pumps work 148.5 ft. 
Average dynamic head against which pumps work 160 ft* 



119 

Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent coal, 

195.2 
Duty. 
Cost of Pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

viz., $2,927.34. 
Per million gallons pumped, $38.59. / 
Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic ), 24.1 cents. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water 

Estimated total population at date, 1,175. 
Estimated population on lines of pipe, 1,145. 
Estimated population supplied, 1,145. 
Total water pumped for the year, 75,817,340 gallons. 
Passed through meters, 22,675,509 gallons. 
Percentage of consumption metered 29.9 + 
Average daily consumption, 207,700 gallons. 
^Gallons per day to each inhabitant, 145. + 
*Gallons per day to each consumer, 148.9. 
^Gallons per day to each tap, 536. + 

*The metered water sold to R. R. Co. is deducted from 
the total consumption in making these averages. 



120 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System 



1. 

2. 
3. 



5. 



7. 



9. 



10. 



11. 



12. 



13. 



14. 



15. 



Mains. 
Kind of pipe, cast iron 

and cement lined. 
Sizes, from 4" to 12". 
Extended ft. 

during year. 
Discontinued 00 ft. 

during year. 
Total now in use? 

26,411 miles. 
Cost of repairs per 

mile, 
Number of leaks per 

.mile, .49. 
Length of pipes less 23. 

than 4 inches diam., 

900 feet. 
Number of hydrants 

added during year, 0. 
Number of hydrants 

(public and private) 

now in use, 122. 
Number of stop gates 

added during year, 

0. 
Number of stop gates 

now in use > 133. 
Number of stop gates 

smaller than 4 inch, 

4. 
Number of blow-offs, 

29. 
Range of pressure on 

mains 40 lbs. to 102 

lbs. 



16. 



17. 

18. 
19. 
20. 

21. 



22. 



24. 



25. 



26. 



Services. 
Kind of pipe, galv. 

iron and cement 

lined. 
Sizes,!" to 4".' 
Extended 145 ft. 
Discontinued 00 feet. 
Total now in use, 

miles. 
Number of service 

taps added during 

year, 10. 
Number now in use, 

318. 
Average length of 

service, 12 feet. 
Average cost of serv- 
ice for the year, 

$15.00. 
Number of meters 

added, 0. 
Number now in use, 

43. 



121 



Engineer's Report 

Duration Number 
of Days 







Gallons 


Pounds 


Rain Pumping Pi 


imped 






Pumped 


Fuel 


Fall 


Hrs. M. 




Feb., 


1913 


5,552,981 


35,808 


1.50 


130 50 


21 


March, 


(< 


5,644,660 


31,110 


6.11 


140 20 


21 


April, 


n ' 


5,510,960 


28,402 


3.75 


135 10 


19 


May, 


a 


6,536,265 


28,888 


3.85 


144 35 


20 


June, 


a 


7,106,906 


31,595 


1.13 


157 30 


21 


July, 


a 


10,448,523 


43,830 


1.93 


232 10 


24 


Aug., 


a 


7,815,431 


34,286 


3.52 


182 00 


25 


Sept., 


ti 


6,699,709 


32,909 


3.02 


158 50 


23 


Oct., 


it 


5,590,578 


29,789 


6.70 


133 00 


19 


Nov., 


a 


5,103,072 


27,929 


.81 


129 35 


18 


Dec, 


et 


4,464,118 


27,567 


4.14 


123 35 


17 


Jan., 


1914 


5,996,130 


36,227 


1.46 


152 00 


23 




76,469,333 388,340 37.92 


1819 35 


251 


Daily, 










209,505 g 


allons 


Largest 


Day, July 9, 




1,057,512 g 


allons 



122 



RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 



Domestic, $6,926 45 

Hydrants, 1,830 00 

Public Buildings, * 85 45 

Highway Department, 22 00 

Cemetery Commissioner, 2 years, 20 00 



Total Domestic Rate, 






$8,883 90 


Meters 








Boston & Maine R. R. Company, 
Water Troughs, 
Centre School, 
Other Meter Rates, 


$1,409 15 

413 46 

102 62 

1,394 38 




Total Meter Rates, 
Interest, 
Sundries, 




< 


3,319 61 

12 72 
15 27 


Total Receipts, 


812,231 50 


Payments 
Expense, 
Fuel, 
Salaries, 
Interest, 






$148 68 
1,579 14 
1,681 50 
3,215 00 


Repairs and Renewals : — 








Account Reservoir, 

Service Pipes, 
Pipe System, 
Pump Station, 






57 60 
125 59 
326 74 
615 71 


Construction : — 








Account Service Pipes, 
Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, 






293 30 

2,000 00 
2,173 37 


Total, 
Balance on hand, Feb. 1,1914, 
Uncollected, 




$12,216 63 

14 87 

956 57 



123 



WATER 



Payments 

Jas. T. Laird, Services as Superintendent 

and Engineer, $1,039 00 

Jas. T. Laird, Labor of Horse, 86 00 

Frank Cunningham, Services as Fireman, 204 00 
Frank Cunningham, Labor on Water 

Extensions, 150 07 

Waltham Coal Co., Coal, 274 24 

M. L. Snelling, Coal, 1,223 67 

M. L. Snelling, Teaming Coal, 63 90 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 3 03 

National Express Co., Express, 14 78 
C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer, Coupons, Due 

March 1st, 877 50 
C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer, Coupons, Due 

June 1st, 642 50 

First National Bank, Coupons, Due June 1st, 000 00 
First National Bank, Coupons, Due Sept, 

1st, 877 50 
First National Bank, Coupons, Due, May 

1st, 87 50 

First National Bank Coupons, Due Nov. 1st, 87 50 
First National Bank, Payments of Coupons, 

Due May 1st, 642 50 
First National Bank, two $500 Bonds, Due 

Sept. 1st, 1,000 00 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service of Light, 11 15 

John F. Farrar & Son, 1 Cord of Pine Wood, 6 00 

Benjamin W. Pike, Set of Harness, 13 00 



124 



t 



14 


25 


7 


75 


5 


00 


6 


00 


26 


00 


2,173 


37 


2 


00 


87 


70 


30 


00 


11 


63 


54 


00 


7 


38 


78 


00 



M. H. Doherty, Horse Hire, 

Geo. E. Crosby Co., Printing, 

W. C. Pierce, Rent of Land, 

Frank F. Place Co., Repairing Clock, 

William Johnson, Services, , 

Commissioners of Sinking Fund, Sinking 
Fund, 

Jas. T. Calkins, Digging and Filling Trench, 

Roger Sherman, Moving Ashes, 

Waltham Coal Co., Pipe, 

Cemetery Commissioners, Wood, 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Reading Meters, 

M. H. Doherty, Delivering Freight, 

W. H. Sherman, Services as Commissioner, 

Jos. S. Hart, M. D., Services as Commis- 
sioner, 75 00 

Geo. L. Chapin, Services as Commissioner 

and Collector, 250 00 

R. D. Donaldson, Cash paid Boston Steam 
Pump Co., 

C. S. Wheeler, Cash paid for Postage, 

Chapman Valve Co., Supplies, 

Eagle Oil and Supply Co., Supplies, 

National Meter Co., Supplies, 

H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 

Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

Union Water Meter Co., Supplies, 

Builders Iron Foundry, Supplies, 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., Supplies, 

David & Farnum Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

J. B. Hunter & Co., Supplies, 

Hodge Boiler Works, Supplies, 

Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 

Allen Bros., Supplies, 

Broad Gauge Iron Works, Supplies, 

Chadwick Boston Lead Co., Supplies, 



16 


85 


2 


84 


24 


38 


122 


88 


59 


28 


7 


48 


61 


39 


26 


66 


11 


00 


48 


29 


7 


46 




90 


21 


80 


11 


48 


1 


25 


3 


20 


4 


72 



125 



Wilson Lumber Co., Supplies, 

Edson Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

Boston St. P. & Rp. Co., Supplies, 

Deane Steam Pump Co., Supplies, 

Blake & Knowles St. P. Co., Supplies, 

Garlock Packing Co., Supplies, 

Revere Rubber, Supplies, 

I. N. McRae, Labor and Supplies, 

New Eng. Tel. & Tel. Co., Labor, 

Geo. E. Winslow, Labor, 

H. Mueller Mfg. Co., Labor, 

John F. Farrar & Son, Labor, 

Damon & Glenn, Labor, 

Dan McAskill, Labor, 

Kidder Bros., Digging Trench, 

Hartford Insurance Co., Insurance, 

Library Bureau, Stationary, 

Wilkin Press, Stationary, 

Andrew Peterson, Plants, 

Estate of Thorndike, Over Payment on 

Guarantee, 
Roderick B. Laird, Making Out Water Bills, 
C. S. Wheeler, Treas., Payment of $1,000 

Bond, Series 1894, 



Total, 



3 


34 


23 


30 


95 


99 


4 


83 




42 


4 


83 


28 


97 


93 


00 


53 


60 


4 


00 


. 2 


10 


206 


55 


8 


60 


7 


45 


2 


00 


65 


00 


7 


75 


3 


75 


6 


88 


18 


49 


3, 12 

i 


00 


1,000 


00 


$12,216 


63 



126 



Month Total gallons Average gallon 

1913. pumped. per day. 

January 5,235,000 168,900 

February 5,490,000 196,100 

March 5,690,000 183,500 

April 5,539,000 184,600 

May 6,540,500 211,000 

June 7,149,000 238,300 

July 10,450,500 337,100 

August 7,873,000 254,000 

September 6,713,500 223,800 

October 5,582,000 180,100 

November 5,037,000 167,900 

December 4,518,000 145,700 



75,817,500 207,700 



12' 



oo 
o 



o 

CO 



CO 

1—1 



oo 

o 



o 

CO 



CO 

T— I 



O 



m 
i— i 

HH 
I— I 

PQ 
< 



m 
m 
O 

•J 

Q 



O 



1— I 

OS 



g 






CONiO(NO(M 

OO CO 1— l <M tO 00 
^ CO 00 © (N CO 

H^COC^HlO 
^ t-H t-H CO i-l tO 



00 

© 



o 

CO 



CO 



OH^ 


iO 


O tO CO 


T— 1 


ONCO 


^ 


O 00 t-H 


O 


O J>- ^H 


<M 






CO ^ CO 


^ 


OO t-H 


O 


<Z& T-H 


CSI 




m 



CM 

t-H 
© 



o 

r-H 

-9 a 

go "^ 

ce ^ 3 
>-i !> s_ 

O O 3 



GONOO 
T— I to ^t 1 O 

t^ CO O O 
CO >o t— 1 o 
CO Ci CO CO 



00 



<N 



tO 



o 

O 














O 
fl 












cu 


flj 










Ph 


>» 










a 


*H 

O 

6*H 






r/T 


+3 




PI 


03 


.^ 


0) 


?H 


'cs 


bJO 


D, 


fl") 


c^ 


<u 


p 


+3 


X 


J3 


S 


4-J 


<±J 


CU 



o 
H 



CQ 


^ 


H 


T3 

0> 


W 


-^> 


0Q 


CD 


GQ 




<! 


"3 




CJ 




fl - 








■gawp* 




g W d UD 




+3 u ; a 




r/5 CU 'M 




Com 
Wat 

Fuel 
Sink 



128 



WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT 

WATER RECEIPTS. 

Domestic, $8,883 90 

Meters, 3,319 61 

Uncollected, 956 57 



$13,160 08 



OUTSTANDING WATER BONDS. 

Issue of 1894, due 1914, $1,000 00 

Issue of 1897, due 1917, 10,000 00 

Issue of 1900, due 1930, 23,000 00 

Issue of 1902, due 1932, 9,000 00 

Issue of 1903, due 1933, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1904, due 1934, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1906, due 1936, 14,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due 1937, 4,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due one each year, 7,000 00 

Issue of 1911, " " " " 5,000 00 



$83,000 00 



129 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

The work of removing the less desirable trees, other 
than those on lots of private ownership, has been con- 
tinued. It is hoped that the consent of owners may be 
granted that further removals, which in the judgment qf 
your Commissioners would be an improvement to the 
general appearance of the grounds, may be made. 

As a certain amount of grading and additional trees 
and shrubbery will be desirable in connection with the 
general care of the grounds an appropriation equal to 
that of last year is respectfully requested. 

JULIUS .E. EVELETH, 
GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 
JOSEPH S. HART, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



130 



THE TOWN TREASURER IN ACCOUNT WITH 
THE LINCOLN CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Received Fitchburg R. R. Co., dividends $10 00 

" American Sugar Refining Co., dividends . . . 28 

" Water Works for wood 116 

Total $49 63 

Deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings ... 49 63 



The following is a list of the Securities of the Lincoln Cemetery Com- 
missioners : — ■ 

Four Shares American Sugar Refining Co., preferred stock. 
Three Shares Union Pacific R. R. Co., preferred stock. 
Two Shares Fitchburg R. R. Co., preferred stock. 

Also the following funds for the care of 'lots in cemetery, 
deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings: — 
OriJla J. Flint Fund, $300.00, interest accrued . 
Samuel Hartwell Fund, $300.00, interest accrued 
John H. Pierce Fund, $500.00, interest accrued. 
Maria L. Thompson Fund, $500.00, interest accrued 
Annie A. Ray Fund, $300.00, interest accrued . 
Also 
General Funds deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings 

amounting to 417 41 

(Signed) CHARLES S. WHEELER, 

Town Treasurer. 
E. & O. E. 



of which 


are 


$24 72 


24 


72 


35 


90 


41 


20 


24 


72 



131 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT. 

The Tree Warden submits to the Town his report for 
the year 1913. 

The work of this department this year has been mostly 
against the brown tail and gypsy moths and elm leaf beetle 
and has been carried on as it was the previous year, 
cutting off brown tail nests and creosoting gypsy moth 
nests on the trees on the highways and on private prop- 
erty where owners wished to pay for the labor. Tanglefoot 
bands were also put on trees along the roadsides, in the 
badly infested places. 

Spraying was started a week earlier than usual this 
year, therefore enabling us to give more time to our elm 
trees and helping us greatly toward holding the elm leaf 
beetle in check; beginning the third week in May and 
continuing to the last week in June. During this time all 
the trees on the highways and about 200 acres of wood- 
land were sprayed with very good results. 

On account of the large flight of brown tail moths 
through the town this year and the large number of oak 
trees which we have on our roadsides, I found it necessary 
to spray 11 days in August so as to kill the small brown 
tail caterpillars which are hatched out and feeding at 
this time, before they had a chance to make their nests 
for the winter. This spraying was a success and is a 
much easier way where it can be done than climbing 
the trees and cutting off the nests. 

During July, August, September and part of October 
the dead wood was removed from trees on most of the 
highways, and the brush cut and burned on the roadsides. 

The total expenditure of this department this year was 



132 



$4,437.81. Of this amount $2,096.12 has been returned 
to the Town Treasurer from private work, leaving a net 
cost of $2,341.59 to the Town, including the payment 
which w T as made to the State Forester's office for the 
new sprayer. 

For the coming year I recommend that $2,500.00 be 
appropriated for this work, $2,000,00 for brown tail and 
gypsy moths and $500.00 for tree and elm leaf beetles. 

JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



133 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS 

The Committee on Claims make the following report : 

The case of George L. Chapin and Others v. The Town 
of Lincoln and Charles S. Wheeler, which was entered in 
the Supreme Court on the 13th of May, 1913, and which 
presents the question whether the Town has the right to 
issue bonds for the purpose of restoring to the treasury 
money expended for water purposes, was heard before a 
single justice who directed that an injunction should issue 
restraining the Town from issuing bonds as proposed. 
The case was reported to the Supreme Court and was 
argued before that Court on the 27th of January in the 
present year, and no decision has yet been announced. 

The case of Town of Lincoln v. George L. Chapin and 
the First Parish, resulted in a decree determining the 
boundary between Mr. Chapin and the Town and also 
fixing the line between the Town and the Parish. By this 
decree a portion of the present schoolhouse building 
stands upon land which does not belong to the Town. 
Exceptions to the decree have been filed but under the 
vote of the Town passed at the last meeting, they have 
not been pressed, pending negotiations between the 
Parish and the Town for a settlement of the boundary 
between them. 

These negotiations have progressed for some time with 
the result that the Parish proposes that an agreement 
and mutual release, as stated in the letter of Mr. Hodges 
appended to this report, be executed by the Parish and 
the Town. 

The effect of this would be to make the so-called 



134 



"Bedford Road" the boundary between the land of the 
Town and land of the Parish, except that so much of the 
land on the west side of the road as is given to the Town 
by the decree already mentioned would be excepted from 
the holding of the Parish. 

The agreement further provides that the land assigned 
to the Parish shall be used by it only for parochial pur- 
poses and the land assigned to the Town shall be used by 
it only for municipal purposes, and the only effect would 
be to leave the use of the land by the inhabitants of the 
Town much as it is used today. The right of way from 
the road to the schoolhouse is also secured. 

The title of the Parish and the Town to the land in 
question is very difficult to ascertain, and it is very 
doubtful whether any court would establish a line with 
confidence. The division proposed leaves the land sub- 
stantially as it is and only terminates the dispute by 
giving each of the contending parties title to a portion 
of the land. The land itself can be of very little pe- 
cuniary value, and your Committee are of opinion that it 
makes very little practical difference whether the title 
to the land is in the Parish or the Town. 

We think however that there should be released to the 
Town so much of the land on which the present school 
building stands, as is by the decree assigned to other 
parties. Such a release would give no one anything of 
much value but would relieve the Town from the neces- 
sity perhaps of taking away such large portions of the 
present building as would make the residue practically 
worthless. While the building is used as a school, the 
right of the Town to maintain it as it is, would hardly 
be questioned, but the building may be useful for other 
purposes and the cutting off of what stands on the land of 
others would be an expensive and destructive operation. 



135 



We think that it is for the interest of all parties that the 
release proposed be made, if the land on which the school 
house stands be released to the Town. 

MOORFIELD STOREY, 
JULIUS E. EVELETH, 
CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

George Clarendon Hodges, Counsellor at Law, 
31 Milk Street, Boston, Mass. 

February 17, 1914. 
Dear Mr. Storey: — 

On behalf of the First Parish of Lincoln, I suggest as a 
fair settlement of the differences between the Parish and 
the Town, in regard to the Common: 

That the decision of the Land Court stand; 

That the Town release and quitclaim to the Parish the 
land lying westerly and northerly from the middle line 
of the Bedford Road, excepting therefrom the parcel to 
which title in the Town was registered under the Land 
Court's decision; 

That the Parish release and quitclaim to the Town the 
land lying easterly and southerly of that middle line of 
the Bedford Road, and 

That as a part of the mutual releases, it be understood 
and agreed that, thereafter, the Parish and its successors 
shall maintain, substantially as hitherto, the tract re- 
leased to them and use the same for parochial purposes 
only, and the Town shall . maintain, substantially as 
hitherto, the tract released to it, and use the same for 
civic purposes only, and, without acquiring under the 
mutual releases any rights of way over the tract quit- 
claimed to the Parish, may continue its use thereof 
substantially as heretofore, for purposes of access to the 
parcel of land excepted from its release to the Parish — 



136 



that being the parcel to which title in the Town was 
registered by the decision of the Land Court. 

This would release to the Parish on the west of the 
Bedford Road a small tract purchased by the Town, and 
in turn would release to the Town on the east of the Bed- 
ford Road, a tract, (in my judgment, rather larger), now 
belonging to the Parish under the deed of Flint to Brown 
and others in 1745. In stating the relative dimensions 
I have taken no account whatever of the land actually 
occupied by the church edifice on the one side or by the 
Town Hall on the other. 

Under this plan there would be no change in the use of 
the Common. 

Very truly yours, 

GEORGE CLARENDON HODGES. 

Moorfield Storey, Esq., 
53 State Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



137 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

The Trustees have the honor to submit the following 
statement, and financial showing, as respects the doings 
of the Library for the year just closed. 

CHARLES F. ADAMS, 

Chairman Trustees. 



138 



COOONOOOCOSCOO'fOiOoOmOOOOHiOOOOfO 
OO(NNOINr}iOO(NQ0NONoONmi0Oh05NNO!DH 

OOHrtO^affl®>0NOHi0o^M^t9^ NhhOhM 
OON(NOOtD(N^T)i (NhhhN NhiMO) 

<N<N <N(N rH 

' ' 0} g . • • 

■ ■H 

© g 
• \S£I .......... 

cq • . = -lr • • . • • • t, . • • . 

£ s § * 

h • -gh. ..-. ■ • ■ a • • • • --« -I : \j 

5 ' --S.SS —3 ■■§. • :* ■ • \9 ■% *| v° • 

' : " § S M o © " -a © . 3 .a • .-C M-c s ^ . 

Isli&ll-p-s ns^i;- I si si i 

a. r s Ji i^gis-K PPi<t Si* ' 

IMf 8-S-S3 s s lis !|-||1§ glM a« 1 





b- o ■>* co t- to b- •* io os 

OS O y-* Tf i-i ^ ■* OS i-H 



•C * 

Q. 03 

a ,2 



>> 



=3 © 3 

© ©^"S 

3 3 flj^ 
03 02 afcH 



i t> © 

Mc3 P. 

© t»a 

IH ©„. 
g © cS 



H«Otf 



d S (_ 03 

£_£ ©■* 

2««ffi§ 



<3 © ©<5< -|13^ 



MM 



^•oo 8.3. 

O O O © ©a, 

8 

05 : : : r : 

Pi 

fa 



139 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE LINCOLN 
PUBLIC LIBRARY FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
FEB. i, 1914 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1913, 9,675 

Increase by purchase, 190 

Increase by gift, 5 

Increase by binding periodicals, 13 

Total increase 209 

Number of volumes rebound, 52 
Number of volumes withdrawn, replaced by 

new editions, 6 

Number of volumes in Library, Feb. 1, 1914, 9,884 

Total delivery of books for year, 7,895 

Largest delivery in one day (April 16), 122 

Smallest delivery in one day (Dec. 30), 39 

Number of days Library was open, 103 



140 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Gifts of books, periodicals, etc., have been received 
from the following persons: — Hon. C. F. Adams, 
Doubleday, Page Co., Mr. Geo. Farrar, Lieutenant C. 
E. Gilpin, Mr. Arthur E. Horton, Mr. Franklin 
McNeagh, Mrs. Harriet C. Richardson, Mr. J. Waldo 
Smith, Mr. H. S. Sears, Miss Bertha Scripture, Miss 
Anna Tarbell, Secretary of Treasury Department, 
Washington. 



141 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ACCESSIONS TO THE LIBRARY FOR 1913. 

BIOGRAPHY. 

Agassiz, Alexander. Letters and recollections: With a sketch 

of his life and work, edited by G. Agassiz . . . 641 . 5 

Albee, Helen R. The gleam 641 . 8 

Barr, Amelia E. All the days of my life: An autobiography. 

The red leaves of a human heart 644 . 2 

Barrows, Isabel C. A sunny life: The biography of Samuel 

June Barrows • . 632 . 18 

DeKoven, Mrs. R. Life and letters of John Paul Jones. 2 vols. 631 .22 
Disraeli, Benjamin. Life of B. Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield. 

2 Vols 643.15 

Edgecumbe, Richard, Editor. Diary of Frances Lady Shelley, 

1787-1817 632.19 

Egan, Maurice Francis. Everybody's St. Francis . . . 643.16 

Home, C. Silvester. David Livingstone 643.17 

Hunt, Caroline L. Life of Ellen H. Richards . . . . 643 . 19 
La Follette, Robert M. La Follette's autobiography: A 

personal narrative of political experiences . . . 644.5 

Lodge, Henry Cabot. Early memories 641.2 

London, Jack. John Barleycorn 632.20 

McCarthy, Justin. Our book of memories. Letters of Justin 

McCarthy to Mrs. Campbell Praed 643.20 

Meade, George. Life and letters of George Gordon Meade: 

Major General United States. 2 vols 644.1 

Miur, John. Story of my boyhood and youth .... 634 . 20 
Norton, Eliot. Letters: with biographical comment by his 

daughter Sara Norton, and M. A. DeWolfe Howe 2 vols. 641 . 3 
Parker, David B. A Chautauqua boy in '61 and afterwards. 

Edited by Torrence Parker 644.4 

Pennington, Patience. A woman rice planter: With an intro- 
duction by Owen Wister 641.6 

Pickett, George E. Heart of a soldier; as revealed in the 

intimate letters of George E. Pickett, C. S. A. . . . 644 . 3 

Pickett, Mrs. George E. Pickett and his men . . . . 636.10 

Pillsbury, Albert E. Lincoln and slavery 641.7 

Powell, E. Alexander. Gentlemen rovers .... 414.24 

Smalley, George W. Anglo American memories . . . 643.18 
Washburn, Stanley. Nogi : A man against the background ol a 

great war . . . 537 . 4 



142 



HISTORY. 



Adams, Charles Francis. Trans- Atlantic solidarity: Lectures 
delivered before the University of Oxford in Easter and 

Trinity terms, 1913 352.12 

'"Tis sixty years since." Address of Charles Francis 
Adams, Founder's day, January 16, 1913. University of 

South Carolina . . . 352 . 13 

Coburn, Frank Warren. Battle of April 19, 1775 : In Lexington, 
Concord, Lincoln, Arlington, Cambridge, Somerville, and 

Charlestown, Massachusetts 356.12 

Hudson, Charles. History, of the town of Lexington, Mass., 
from its first settlement to 1868. Revised and continued 
to 1912 by the Lexington Historical Society . . . 351.4 

Lamson, Daniel S. History of the town of Weston, Mass. . 351.5 

Lang, Andrew. Short history of Scotland 355 . 14 

Morse, Edwin M. Causes and effects in American history: 

The story of the origin and development of the nation . 355 . 15 
Rhodes, James Ford. Lectures on the American Civil War: 
delivered before the University of Oxford, in Easter and 

Trinity terms, 1912 . . " 348.7 

Thayer, William Roscoe. Short history of Venice . . . 352.11 
Vital Records of Lincoln, Mass., to the year, 1850 . . . 351.7 

Vital records of Lexington, Mass., to January 1, 1898 . . . 351 . 8 

Young, Bowman. Battle of Gettysburg 355.15 



TRAVEL AND DESCRIPTION. 



Bryce, James. South America: Observations and impressions 446.23 
Castle, William R. Hawaii, past and present .... 411.18 
Collier, Price. Germany and the Germans: From an American 

point of view . . . 411.17 

Crawford, Mary Caroline. Romantic days in the eaily republic 446 . 22 
Elmendorf, Dwight L. A camera crusade; through the 

Holy Land 421.20 

Enock, C. Reginald. Secret of the Pacific 436.30 

Franck, Harry A. Zone policeman 88: A close range study of 

the Panama Canal and its workers 421.21 

Irving, Washington. Captain Bonneville. 2 vols. . . . 447.6 

Kendall, Elizabeth. Wayfarer in China: Impiessions of a trip 

across West China and Mongolia 447.5 

Laut, Agnes C. Through our unknown Southwest. The 

wonderland of the United States. Little known and 

unappreciated. The home of the cliff dweller, the Hopi, 

and the forest ranger 414.21 



143 



Meriwether, Lee. Seeing Europe by automobile: A five- 
thousand-mile motor trip through France, Switzerland, 
Germany, and Italy, with an excursion into Andorra, 
Corfu, Dalmatia, and Montenegro 446.21 

Morley, Margaret W. Carolina mountains 414.23 

Stock, Ralph. Confessions of a tender foot. Being a true and 

unvarnished account of his world wanderings . . . 414.22 

White, Stewart Edward. Land of footprints .... 447.5 



SCIENCE. USEFUL ARTS. 

Curtiss, Glenn H. and Post, Augustus. The Curtiss aviation 

book 144.25 

Farmer, Fannie Merritt. New book of cookery . . . 141.25 

Hortico, Louis. Art in France 143.27 

Ko ester, Frank. Electricity for farm and home . . . . 137.27 
Massachusetts State Board of Agriculture.. Fifty-ninth 
annual report of the Secretary of the State Board of 
Agriculture. Together with the twenty-fourth annual 

report of the Agricultural Experiment Station . . 214.10 

Munroe, James Phinney. New demands in education . . 147.26 

Neil, Marion Harris. How to cook in casserole dishes . . 131 . 8 

Robinson, John H. Principles and practise of poultry culture 112.12 

Rosenau, M. J. The milk question 144.24 

REGLIGION. PHILOSOPHY. 

Gordon, George A. Revelation and the ideal .... 1137.7 

Kaufman, Herbert. Do something! Be something! A new 

philosophy of human efficiency 1123.14 

King, Henry Churchill. Religion as life 1137.8 

McAfee, Cleland-Boyd. The greatest English classic: A study 

of the King James version of the Bible and its influence 

on life and liteiature 1137.6 

McComb, Samuel. Prayer, what it is, and what it does. The 

latest conception of the oldest force in the world . . 1137.9 
Rauschenb erg, Walter. Christianizing the social order . . 1134.16 



FICTION. 

Bacon, Josephine. Daskam. The inheritance 
Barclay, Florence L. The broken halo 
Blackwood, Algernon. A prisoner in fairyland 
Brown, Alice. Vanishing points . 
Burnett, Frances Hodgson. T. Tembarom 
Cather, Willa Sibert. O pioneers 
Carleton, William. New lives for old . 



752 . 15 
764.7 

751.28 
751.1 
764.4 

751.26 
751.4 



144 



Churchill, Winston. Inside the cup 751 . 9 

Crockett, S. R. Patsy 752.24 

Davis, Richard Harding. Red Cross girl 752.14 

Farnol, Jeffery. Amateur gentleman 751.17 

Gale, Zona. Christmas 751.6 

Glasgow, Ellen. Virginia 751 . 12 

Hallard, Alys. On the Branch; from the French of Pierre De 

Coulevain 751.3 

Harrison, Henry Sydnor. V. Vs. Eyes 751 . 18 

Houseman, Lawrence. King John of Jingals: Story of a 

monarch in difficulties 751 . 22 

Howells, William Dean. New leaf mills 752.21 

Hutchinson, A. S. M. The happy warrior . . . . 752.26 

Irvine, Alexander. My lady of the chimney corner . . . 751 . 19 

Jacobs, W. W. Odd craft 751.20 

Johnston, Mary. The long roll . . . . * . . . 752.25 

Lincoln, Joseph C. Mr. Pratt's patients 751 . 14 

Rise of Roscoe Payne 752 . 20 

Lippmann, Julie M. Making over Martha .... 764.6 

Locke, William J. Stella Maris 751.4 

London, J. Smoke Bellew 752.17 

Martin, Edward Sandford. Reflections of a begining husband 764. 10 

Merwin, Samuel. The citadel 752.22 

Mitchell, S. Weir. West ways: A village chronicle . . . 764.1 

Montgomery, L. M. The golden road 764.5 

Montague, Margaret Prescott. Linda 752.23 

Oppenheim, E. Phillips. The mischief maker .... 751.8 

Porter, Eleanor H. Pollyanna 764.4 

Porter, Sidney (O.Henry). Four million . . ". . . . 751.24 

Porter, Sidney (O. Henry). Options 751.29 

The trimmed lamp ......... 752 . 18 

Voice of the city 752 . 19 

Richards, Laura E. Miss Jimmy 751 . 16 

Scott, Gertrude Fisher. Jean Cabot at Ashton . . . . 752.13 

Sidgwick, Ethel. Succession 761 . 1 

Silberrad, Una L. Karen of Lowbole 751.23 

Sinclair, May. Flaw in the crystal 752 . 16 

Singsmaster, Elsie. Gettysburg stories of the red harvest and 

the aftermath 751 . 5 

Stratton-Porter, Gene. Laddie 751.25 

Thompson, Adele E. Brave heart Elizabeth: A story of the 

Ohio border 751.21 

Tompkinsj Juliet W. Ever after 751.11 

Ward, Mrs. Humphrey. The Coryston family . . . 764.9 

Mating of Lydia 751.2 



145 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS. 

Alcott, Louisa M. Aunt Jo's scrap bag. 6 vols. . . . 838.5 

Under the lilacs 838.4 

Arthur, E. B. Sonny boy's day at the Zoo 1242.6 

Collins, Francis A. The wireless man : His work and adventure 

on land and sea 846.25 

Bicknell, Leona Mildred. How a little girl went to Africa: As 

told by herself 1238.16 

Baldwin, James. The Sampo; hero adventures from the 

Finnish Kalevala 846 . 22 

Baibour, Ralph Henry. Crofton chums 838.6 

Burgess, Thornton W. Adventures of Johnny Chuck . . 1242.4 

Adventures of Reddy Fox 1242.5 

Craik, Dinah M. Adventures of a Brownie; as told to my child 846 . 24 

Demetrius, George. When I was a boy in Greece . . . 1238.17 

Douglas, Amanda M. Red house children at Grafton . . . 1242.9 

Dowd, Emma C. Polly of Lady Gay cottage .... 1241.18 

Dudley, Albertus T. The half-miler 1242.11 

Eaton, Walter Prichard. Boy scouts of Berkshire . . . 838.7 
Fraser, Chelsea Curtis. Every boy's book of handicraft, 

sports, and amusements; worth while plans for the 

general activities of the modern boy, be he handy or 

unhandy 1242.19 

Harris, Garrard. Joe the book farmer; making good on the land 1242.12 

Hawkins, Chauncey J. Ned Brewster's year in the big woods 1242.7 

Hough, Emerson. Young Alaskans in the Rockies . . . 1242.16 

Johnston, Annie Fellows. Miss Santa Claus of the Pullman . 1242 . 17 
Maeterlinck, Mme. Georgette (Leblanc. ) Children's blue 

bird; translated by A. Teixeira de Mattos . . . 1242.1 

Lindsay, Maud. Mother stories 1241.21 

More mother stories 1241.22 

Maule, Harry E. Boy's book of new inventions . . . 1241.19 

Moulton, Louise Chandler. Bed-time stories .... 1241.23 

More bed-time stories 1241 . 24 

Otis, James. , Boy scouts in a lumber camp 1242.13 

Pyle, Howard. The wonder clock 1241 . 25 

Richards, Laura E. Little master 1242.18 

Roberts, Charles G. D. Feet of the furtive .... 1241.20 

Rolt- Wheeler, Francis. Boy with the U. S. fisheries . . . 1241.26^ 

Sabin, Edwin L. With Carson and Fremont . . . 838.8 

Schultz, James Willard. With the Indians in the Rocki3s . 1241.27 
Smith, E. Boyd. Railroad book: Bob and Betty's summer on 

the railroad 1242 . 3 

Smith, Mary P. Wells. Boy captive in Canada . . . . 846.24 

Tappan, Eva March. American hero stories .... 1221.27 

European hero stories 1221.28 

House with the silver door . 1242.15 



14G 



Tomlinson, Everett T. Boy sailors of 1812 : A story of Perry's 

victory on Lake Erie in 1813 1242.10 

Young minute man of 1812 1227.23 

Young sharpshooter: Story of the Peninsular campaign 

in 1862 1242 . 8 

Wells, Carolyn. Patty's social season . . . . . . 1242.14 

Wood, Charles S. "Don't give up the ship" .... 1227.24 

GENERAL LITERATURE. 

Arnold, Gertrude Weld. Mother's list of books for children . 1537.15 
Benson, Arthur Christopher. Along the road. Contents: — 
Old England. An Autumn landscape. St. Govan's. 
A ruined house. St. Anthony in the Fells. Antiquities 
and amenities. Mottoes. On being interrupted. De- 
mocracy. Absent-mindedness. Peace. Conversation. 
Art and life. Sympathy. Jealousy. Home truths. 
Superstition. Letter-writing. Vulgarity. Sincerity. 
Resolutions, Publicity and privacy. Experience. Res- 
ignation. The wind. Use of poetry. War. On mak- 
ing friends. Compulsory Greek. Gambling. Hymns. 
Preachers and preaching. The yourger generation. 
Reading. Biography. Gossip. Tactfulness. The inner life 1536.20 
Briggs, Le Baion Russell. College life: Essays reprinted from 
"School, College, and Character," and ' 'Routine and 

ideals" 1537.20 

Brooks, John Graham. American syndicalism .... 1537.18 
Crothers, Samuel McChord. Humanly speaking. Contents: — 
Humanly speaking. In the hands of a receiver. The 
contemporaneousness of Rome. The American tempera- 
ment. The unaccustomed ears of Europe. Thetoryism 
of travellers. The obviousness of Dickens. Spoiled 
children of civilization. On realism as an investment. 

To a citizen of the old school 1537.12 

Fisher, Dorothy Canfield. A Montessori mother . . . 1316.15 
Hornaday, William T. Our vanishing wild life: Its preserva- 
tion and extermination 1334.28 

Hunter, George Lei and. Home furnishings: Facts and figures 
about furniture, carpets and rugs, lamps and lighting 
fixtures, wall papers, window shades and draperies, 

tapestries, etc 1325.29 

Lee, Gei aid Stanley. Crowds: A moving picture of democracy; 
in five boooks. Crowds and machines. Letting the 
crowd be good. Letting the crowd be beautiful. Crowds 
and heroes". Good news and hard work .... 1316.16 

McKeever, William A. Training the boy 1537.19 

Martin, Edward Sandford. Unrest of women .... 1536.21 



147 



Martin, Edwin C. Our own weather: A simple account of its 

curious foims, its wide travels and its effects . . . 1316.17 
Needham, Mary Master. Folk festivals : Their growth and how 

to give them 1537 . 14 

Northend, Mary H. Colonial homes and their furnishing . 1531.7 

Pennell, Elizabeth R. Our house: and London out of doors . 1537.16 
Porter. Gene Stratton. Moths of the Limberlost : With water 

colors and photographic illustrations from life . . . 1531.8 
Repplier, Agnes. Americans and others. Contents: — Question 
of politeness. Mission of humour. Goodness and 
gayety. Nervous strain. Girl graduate. Estranging 
sea. Tiaveler's tales. Chill of enthusiasm. Tempta- 
tion of Eve. "Greatest of these is Charity." Customary 
correspondent. The benefactor. Condescension of 

borrowers. The grocer's cat 1537.13 

Robinson, Mrs. W. S. Warrington pen portraits . : . 1537.17 
Schofield. William Henry. Chivalry in English literature: 

Chaucer, Malory, Spenser, and Shakespeare . . . 1316.14 
Smith, William Hawley. All the children of all the people; a 

study of the attempt to educate everybody . . . 1536.19 
Talbot, Frederick A. Lightships and lighthouses . . . 1533.21 
Walton, George L. Calm yourself 1536.18 

PERIODICALS. REFERENCE. 

Atlantic monthly magazine for 1911, 1912. Vols. 107, 108, 109, 

110. 
Century magazine for 1911, 1912. Vols. 81, 82, 83, 84. 
Harper's magazine for 1911, 1912. Vols. 124, 125. 
St. Nicholas for 1911, 1912, 1913. 3 vols. 
Britannica year book, 1913 Ref.R.R 

DRAMA. 

Kennedy, Charles Rann. The necessary evil: A one-act stage 

play for four persons 1436 . 16 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR 1913 




150 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman, Term expires 1914 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY, Secre tary, Term expires 1916 
MRS. ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, 

Terms expires 1915 

Superintendent of Schools 

C. S. LYMAN 

Supervisor of Drawing and Manual Training 

WALTER F. BRACKETT 

Supervisor of Cooking and Sewing 

MRS. ABBIE P. SMITH 

Teachers 

Lincoln Grrammar Grades VII — VIII 

ABBIE H. BOWLBY 

Lincoln Grammar Grades V — VI 

KATHARINE E. WORKS 
Lincoln Primary Grades III — IV 
HELEN M. BOWKER 
Lincoln Primary Grades I — // 
HATTIE B. HEATH 
South Primary Grades I — II — III 
HELEN P. JONES 
Special Teacher 
PRISCILLA 0. AMES 
Truant Officer 
JAMES T. LAIRD 
Janitors 
Lincoln 
EDWARD BANNON 
South 
PATRICK J. LENNON 

Note — Mr Edward R. Farrar, whose term expired last 
year, was a member of the committee for nineteen 
years, and during sixteen years he was the secretary. 



151 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

When the schools opened for the Fall term it was 
with five new teachers. These new teachers have 
taken up their work with enthusiasm and efficiency, 
and we doubt if there has ever been a time in the history 
of the Lincoln schools when the teaching force has been 
animated by an equal spirit of co-operation, harmony, 
and interest in the work. 

Nevertheless, such frequent changes in the teaching 
force as we have experienced in the last few years are 
to be deplored. The chief cause for these changes 
has been the offer of larger salaries elsewhere. As a 
rule teachers' salaries are much too small. The fact 
that we, as a community, have accustomed ourselves 
to paying small salaries should not blind us to the 
real situation. 

The fact that so many of our teachers have been 
offered higher salaries to go elsewhere, although a 
pleasing recognition of the efficiency of our teaching 
force, shows that if we wish to continue that efficiency 
we must pay for it. 

We feel that the time has come to meet this matter 
squarely, both in fairness to the teachers and to protect 
our schools. 

We wish to take this occasion to condemn most 
strongly the action of those school authorities who seek 
to tempt a teacher to desert her classes during the 
school year. A willingness to demoralize the work of 
another school and to weaken the sense of responsibility 
and devotion which is the proud characteristic of the 
teaching profession, merits public condemnation. 



152 



The accompanying report of the Superintendent calls 
attention to the increase in the number of pupils. At 
the Centre School the pupils are divided into four 
rooms, each room being in charge of a separate teacher. 
There is one large room in the building which has not 
been fitted up as a class room as yet, which can be so 
fitted at any time. If that were to be done, it would 
necessitate another teacher to take charge of it. While 
there is a fifth teacher regularly employed at this 
school, her work is such that it could not well be com- 
bined with having charge of a class room. We hesitate 
to add another class room until it is clear that attend- 
ance will continue sufficiently large to make that neces- 
sary, but unless there is soon some change in this respect 
we fear that it must be done. 

The South Primary Sch-oql last year had an average 
membership of 20. At the present time there are 30 
pupils in that school. We see no present likelihood of 
discontinuing that school and therefore the building 
must be kept in proper condition for school purposes. 
In addition to the incidental repairs necessary in a 
building of that character and age, the heating appara- 
tus is worn out and defective. We are advised that it 
is beyond repair, and that a complete new heating 
apparatus must be installed. We should be glad to 
leave that in the hands of the Selectmen, but we wish 
to make it clear that the matter should be taken care 
of before the opening of the Fall term, and unless it is 
attended to in some other way, we shall feel obliged 
to get it done. 

The Fall term opened with an increase in the number 
attending High School, which has caused a correspond- 
ing increase in expense, both for tuition and transporta- 
tion. Although this expense forms a considerable 
part of our total school expenses, it is doubtless cheaper 
than it would be to maintain a high school in the town, 



153 



and it gives the pupils the advantages of a somewhat 
wider horizon and more varied opportunities, as well as 
putting them in competition with larger numbers. It 
is gratifying to know that their work in the High 
Schools in Concord and in Waltham compares favorably 
with that of the other pupils. 

The report of the Superintendent and the usual 
statistics are appended. 

HENRY E. WARNER, 
ELIZABETH W. BLODGETT, 
ANTHONY J. DOHERTY. 



154 



SUMMARY OF SCHOOL EXPENSES 





1912-1913 


1913-1914 


Superintendent and teachers, 


$4,849.00 


$4,447.00 


High School Tuition, 


1,636.50 


2,188.75 


High School Transportation, 


673.60 


631.95 


Janitors, 


627.00 


615.55 


Water Rates, 


139.11 


128.07 


Fuel 


489.81 


361.55 


Medical Inspector, 


200.00 


200.00 


Repairs, etc., 


95.56 


148.04 


School Supplies, 


392.74 


549.75 


Barges and Transportation, 


2,047.35 


2,596.61 


Miscellaneous, 


46.23 


53.76 




$11,196.90 


$11,921.03 



155 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

To the School Committee of the Town of Lincoln: — 

Herewith I submit my seventh annual report as Sup- 
erintendent of the Lincoln schools. 

Change of Teachers 

It became known among school meh that we had in 
Lincoln good schools and a model school building. 
Visitors were attracted to our schools, and last June 
our teachers were offered much larger salaries than we 
were paying to go elsewhere. Thus we lost all but one 
of our regular force, Miss Heath being the only one to 
remain with us. She has been in the Lincoln schools 
seventeen years and is now on permanent tenure. 

So many vacancies made it necessary for your sup- 
erintendent to look about very carefully in order to 
secure suitable teachers who could take up the work in 
such a masterful way that there would be little loss to 
our schools. As we had an excellent corps of teachers 
last year, this was no easy task. But we were so fortu- 
nate as to secure teachers, who are so ambitious, con- 
scientious and earnest in their work, that the schools 
have gone along smoothly and with very little loss. Of 
course, even under the best conditions, it takes time 
for teachers to get used to a new school, strange pupils 
and an unfamiliar locality and community. They 
must learn the needs and peculiarities of the pupils and 
the Town. It is remarkable that so many new teachers 
should so quickly and easily slip into the life of the 
school and community, and that there should be no 
jar to the school machinery. The discipline is good. 



156 

Pupils and teachers are working together harmoniously, 
and a good degree of progress is being made. Yet I 
hope it will be a long time before we shall again have 
such a wholesale change in teachers. We should be 
able to pay a sufficient salary to retain our best teachers, 
and not be obliged to run the risk of making so many 
changes. 

Teachers' Retirement and Pension Law 

The teachers' retirement and pension law goes into 
effect next Summer. By the terms of this law each 
new teacher must pay to the State a percentage of her 
salary, varying in its yearly amount from $35 to $100. 
Then teachers, retiring between the age limits of sixty 
to seventy years, will receive from the State an annuity 
and a pension. The teachers now in service may 
make these yearly payments and be eligible to draw 
an annuity and pension. Many teachers feel that this 
drain on their meagre resources is greater than they can 
afford. Some towns and cities are seriously consider- 
ing whether it will be advisable to pay this premium 
for the teachers. A few towns have already decided 
to do so. 

Intensive Work Along Certain Lines 

While trying to keep all the school work up to a high 
standard, we believe it an excellent plan, each year, 
to pay special attention to one or two subjects in order 
to place them on a better basis. This year we have 
been working on peninanship and spelling, and as a 
result of this extra attention we are making improve- 
ment along these lines. No matter how well the schools 
may be doing, there is always room for much improve- 
ment, and every effort should be made to keep moving 
forward. 

There are times when every child, be he ever so 
forward, needs to be guided towards the best way of 



157 



doing his work, so that he will get into the habits which 
will make him more efficient. This is especially neces- 
sary in the formation of the right habits of study; and 
to teach pupils to study efficiently is one of the most 
important tasks of the school. In all our schools we 
lay great stress on this point, but to insure its accom- 
plishment the pupils often need individual attention. 
The special teacher in the Lincoln School is doing 
this work well, and many children are receiving great 
benefit from this extra help. Children from the differ- 
ent classes go to her, singly or in groups, to receive aid 
in the particular subject which the regular teacher 
feels such pupils lack the power to study efficiently. 
For a few minutes their attention is held closely to 
the work in hand, they are taught how to pick out the 
most essential points in the lesson, anything not under- 
stood is explained, and when necessary they are drilled 
on the rudiments of the subject. 

Special Studies 

The boys in the manual training classes continue to 
enjoy this work and have made, during the year, many 
things which are useful in their homes. Some of the 
older boys undertake difficult work which they do 
exceedingly well. They have made sand boards and 
other things for use in our schools. 

The girls have become so proficient in cooking and 
sewing, that they are very helpful at home. An eighth 
grade girl kept house and did all the cooking for a 
family of seven for a week during her parents' absence 
from home. A girl from grade six made such good 
bread that her father said he had not eaten such good 
bread for years. Several girls make dresses for their 
younger sisters. 

As in the past two years we exhibited, last September, 
the products from our manual training, cooking, and 



158 



sewing departments and also vegetables, raised by the 
children in home gardens, at the county fair in Fram- 
ingham. The Lincoln schools received a good number 
of premiums. Our pupils made an especially good 
record in Class IV (Manual Training, ) the five leading 
Towns making the following number of points: — 
Hudson, 330; Natick, 190; Framingham, 185; Lincoln, 
155; and Marlboro, 115. 

When we consider that our exhibits compete with 
those from towns which have many times the number of 
children in our schools, it is greatly to the credit of our 
pupils that such a good record was made. Our boys 
and girls have worked earnestly and thoughtfully, and 
the products of this work show care and skill. 

Under the guidance of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College at Amherst many boys and girls 
throughout the State have joined corn, potato and 
market garden clubs and have produced a variety of 
vegetables of excellent quality. Each year a good pro- 
portion of our children have belonged to these clubs 
and some of our boys and girls have been very successful 
with their gardens. This year the State was divided 
into districts in each of which the children competed 
for prizes. There were four districts where boys and 
girls were to compete in planting, caring and account- 
ing for one eighth of an acre of potatoes. Lincoln was 
in the Eastern district, and William C. Pierce, Jr., 
scored the highest number of points, 92; producing 43 i 
bushels of potatoes at a profit of $20.35. In fact, 
William made the best record in the State, the boy, 
who came nearest to him, produced 42 bushels and 
scored 88 points. The first prize consisted of a ten 
days' trip to Amherst and Washington, D. C, with all 
expenses paid. William was one of seven children in 
the State who enjoyed this trip under the guidance of 
Professor Morton of the Agricultural College. For 



159 



several years William has had an excellent garden, 
and his industry and skill have been recognized and 
rewarded. He is now taking the agricultural course at 
the Concord High School. I wish more of our boys 
would take this practical course under the able instruc- 
tion of Mr. Doolittle, who at stated intervals visits 
the boys to examine their work on the home farm. 

Increase in School Membership 

The first year that I took charge of the Lincoln 
schools the average membership was 103, while during 
the past year it was 157, a gain of 54 or more than 50%. 
The next report will show a still larger membership. 
Some of our school rooms are now too full. Last 
Summer extra seats and desks were placed in two rooms. 
If this increase continues, it will be necessary to open 
the fifth room in the Lincoln school in the near future. 
This will mean the addition of another teacher to our 
force. 

The number of pupils attending high schools from 
Lincoln has doubled in the past six years. This in- 
crease in the number of pupils, both in the grades and 
in high schools, has increased the school expenditures. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. S. LYMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



160 



ROLL OF HONOR 



The following pupils have been neither absent nor 
tardy for the time designated: — 



Alice Robus. 



For Three Years 

Emily Robus. 



For Two Years 

Richard Corrigan. Raymond Bowles. 

Lyman Cousins. 



Redman Hartwell 
Sara Clark 



For One Year 

Harriet Pierce 
Robert Weir 
Mary Sherman. 



For Two Terms 



Roy Sims. 
William Bowles. 
Joseph Eaton. 
Helen Pierce. 
Mildred Bates. 
Stansby Bamforth. 
Richard Nelson. 
Marie Connors. 
Lilliam Rocks. 
Emily Chamberlain. 
Chedomille Chamberlain. 
Harold Rocks. 
George Flint. 
Lester Pearson. 

Bernice 



Gladys Hamilton. 
Elizabeth Giles. 
Robert Donaldson. 
Marion Rocks. 
Raymond Bates. 
Malcolm Donaldson. 
Minnie Benedict. 
Gladys Wetherbee. 
Chester Bates. 
Donald Donaldson. 
Waldo Langille. 
Edward Rocks. 
William Robus. 
Royden Berger. 
Cousins. 



161 



For One Term 



Harry Deming. 
Blanche Cousins. 
Howard Bamforth. 
Evelyn Cousins. 
Malcolm Reed. 
Ralph Bamforth. 
James Wilson. 
Bertha Bowles. 
Esther Cousins. 
Francis Corrigan. 
Andrew Weir. 
Kenneth Hamilton. 
Bertha Chapin. 
Doris Lyon. 
Hazel Brooks. 
Louisa Monella. 
Belva Gallent. 
Alice Connors. 
Mary Bradstreet. 
Marion Snelling. 



Marjorie Saddler. 
Albert Brooks. 
Rosa Martin. 
Louis Cook. 
Carl Nelson. 
Melvin Lyon. 
Elizabeth Connors. 
Mary Diamond. 
Margaret Kenna. 
Edward Flint. 
Edna Wetherbee. 
William Weir. 
Catherine Diamond. 
Arthur Regan. 
Rothwell MacRae. 
Charles Clark. 
Grace Farquhar. 
Annie Sherman, 
Ethel MacRae. 
Edgar Browning. 



162 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Winter Term begins January 5, 1914, ends March 27; 
twleve weeks. 

Spring Term begins April 6, ends June 12; ten weeks. 

Fall Term begins September 8 ends December 18; 
fifteen weeks. 

Winter Term begins January 4, 1915, ends March 26; 
twelve weeks. 

Spring Term begins April 5, ends June 18; eleven 
weeks. 

Recess from Wednesday before Thanksgiving to 
Monday following. 

Holidays: Washington's Birthday, Patriot's Day, 
Memorial Day, Columbus Day. 

Length of school year, thirty-eight weeks. 



163 



STATISTICS FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR 1912-1913 

Number of children in Town, September, 1913, 

between the ages of 5 and 15: boys, 109: girls, 98; 

total, 207 

Number of children in Town, September, 1912, 

between the ages of 5 and 15 ... 185 

Number of children in Town, September, 1913, 

between the ages of 7 and 14 : boys, 73 ; girls, 72 ; 

total .145 

Enrollment for the year, ending June, 1913 . . 164 
Enrollment between 5 and 15 years of age . . 164 
Enrollment over 15 years of age 

Enrollment between 7 and 14 years of age . . 137 
Number attending Concord High School ... 23 
Number attending Waltham High School . . 12 
Number of regular teachers employed ... 6 
Number of special teachers employed ... 3 
Number of teachers who have graduated from 

Normal School 5 

Number of teachers who have graduated from 

Training School 1 

Illiterate minors in Town over 14 years of age . . 
Total numbered registered in Lincoln schools during 

the year, ending June, 1913 .... 175 
Number of pupils sent to High Schools from 

Lincoln 35 

Total number receiving instruction at Town 

expense 210 

Number of pupils sent to High Schools from 

Lincoln during the Fall of 1913 ' . . .39 



164 





•93b JO SJB9A" gx 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 




j3ao sjidnj 
















•98b jo ijjb9A f\ pus 2, 


t> 


t^ 


o 


<N 


^ 


t^ 




uaaM^9q s[idn<j 


(M 


CO 


^ 


CM 


rH 


CO 

T— 1 




•a3u jo ejBdit gi pus g 


(N 


00 


o 


<M 


CM 


^ 


CO 


u99M48q ejidn^ 


CO 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CM 


CO 


M 














i-H 


o\ 




<N 


OS 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


M 


•9ouBpao^y 
















jo "^agoigj 


*0 


<N 


CO 


<N 


CM 


CO 






OS 


as 


as 


as 


as 


as 




^h 


o 


i—H 


<*■. 


»o 


Tf 


•90UBpU9WV 














e> 


93BJ9AV 


CO 


1—1 
CO 


to 

CO 


as 

CM 


00 
tH 


CO 

l—l 


o 




T— 1 


(N 


l> 


as 


o 


as 


•diqsj9qui9i^ 
















93BJ9Ay 


CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 


T— 1 

CO 


o 
CM 


CO 
iO 


P 














T— 1 
















fc 


•ejair) — ^agnqiojua 


00 


t^ 


<N 


io 


as 


1— 1 


pa 




■t— 1 


1—1 


<N 


i—H 




00 


< 


•flitog — ^ugrauojxia 


^H 


(N 


00 


T-H 


CO 

l—i 


CO 
00 


•^jodg'jj 9^B^g 


<m 


oo 


o 


cm 


<N 


^ 


^ 


joj ^u9cauojug 


CO 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CM 


CO 


o 
















o 

w 


ejtdnj jo 
%si'j A\rBiu9m9[ddng 


<M 


I— 1 


Tfl 


tH 


O 


1—1 
1— 1 


o 

CO 




































T5 










o 












w 

O 




fe 




o 


'> 




j3 
-+3 


o 




a 


CO 


o 
O 


c3 




<3 

w 


PQ 




5 


CJ 


.2 


-1-3 

o 
o 
A 


t-3 


PQ 

"•+3 

■+3 

w 


pi 

■+3 
U 

o 




fi 
















fc 




^ 












w 


co 

■8 
e 

4 


^H 












% 


1 






1 


^1 


CO 

o 




CO 


£ 


£ 


£ 


£ 


1 


Eh 




!»-«> 


r-^i 


r--^> 


r~o 


r-o 








O 


o 


© 


o 


o 


^ 






© 


<o 


<U 


o 


o 








rf* 


£ 


£ 


£ 


52 


"3 






o 


•<s> 


•<s 


•<^ 


•<s> 


o 






&2 


Kj 


H 


H 


►^ 


^ 





165 



O^p" Town Meeting for election of official ballot, 
Monday, March 2, 1914. 

Polls open from twelve till six. All other business 
on Monday, March 9, 1914, at one o'clock in the 
afternoon. 



WARRANT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said County : 

GREETING: 
In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town affairs, to meet in Bemis Hall 
in said Lincoln, on Monday the second day of March 
next, at 11.30 o'clock A. M. by posting a copy of this 
Warrant by you attested, in each of the Post Offices and 
in some other public place in said Town, seven days at 
least before the said second day of March, then and there 
to act upon the following Articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 

ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law to 
be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees. 

Three Selectmen for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors to be elected 
each year for three years. 



106 



One member of the Board of Health to be elected each 
year for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the School Committee to be elected 
each year for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners to 
be elected each year for three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
to be elected each year for three years. 

Also to vote upon the following question: 

" Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon and may be 
closed at six o'clock P. M. 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 

ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the Col- 
lector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February 1, 1914, 
in anticipation of the collection of taxes for the said year, 
such sums of money as may be necessary for the current 



167 



expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax 
levy for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in 
payment therefor payable in one year from the date 
thereof. All debts incurred under authority of this vote 
shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a Committee 
on Claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will vote to petition the 
Bureau of Statistics for an Auditor in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 598 of the Acts of 1910 and 
Amendments thereto. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will issue water bonds 
pursuant to the Acts of 1907, Chapter 476, and reimburse 
the treasury on account of money paid from the treasury 
pending an issue of bonds on account of payment for 
water construction purposes; also, issue bonds, as afore- 
said on account of payment for water construction pur- 
poses, which have been made from current income of the 
water works or take any other action with reference, to 
the matter. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will authorize the Fire 
Engineers to purchase an auto fire truck and appropriate 
the sum of Two Thousand Dollars for the purchase of 
same. 

ART. 12. To see what instruction the Town will give 
the Committee on Claims with reference to the settle- 
ment of the controversy in regard to the Common 
between the Lincoln First Parish and the Town; also, to 
see what action the Town will take with reference to 
the schoolhouse located in the center of the Town on 



1G8 



land, the title to which is to be registered in the Town 
by the Land Court, or take any action with reference 
to the matter that the Town may see fit. 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will authorize the Water 
Commissioners to install an electric pump at the Pump- 
ing Station and make provision for the payment of same . 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will extend the electric 
lights from the house of C. Edgar Wheeler to the Weston 
line and appropriate money for the same. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will install one electric 
light at the bend of the road between the residences of 
R. D. Donaldson and I. N. MacRae. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the electric 
street lighting system from the house of E. F. Flint 
to the Lexington line and appropriate money for the 
same. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town will accept the pro- 
visions of Section 5, Chapter 536, of the Acts of 1909, or 
any other acts in relation to same. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will appropriate money 
to reimburse the First Parish and Mr. George L. Chapin 
or either of them for the expenses incurred in connection 
with the registering of title to schoolhouse lot, or take 
any action in relation to the matter. 

ART. 19. To see if the Town will take measures to 
revise of amend or abolish the By-Laws, or take any 
other action with reference to the matter. 



169 



ART. 20. To see if the Town will accept the pro- 
visions of any act or acts them thereto enabling to pro- 
vide by By-Laws or otherwise for issuing local licenses to 
junk dealers, or take any action with reference to the 
matter. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time 
for the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twentieth day of February 
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and 
fourteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
JOHN F. FARRAR. 

Selectmen of Lincoln, 



170 



By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln. 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

Middlesex, ss. 

At the Superior Court, within and for the County 
of Middlesex, Anno Domini, 1897, 



The following By-Laws of the Town of Lincoln, in said 
County, are presented to this Court for approval, to wit: — 

"ARTICLE I. 

Town Meetings. 

Section 1. The annual town meeting shall be held on 
the first Monday of March in each year. 

Sect. 2. Notice of every town meeting shall be given by 
posting copies of the warrant calling the same, attested by 
the officer making service thereof, in each of the post-offices 
within the town, and in one of the churches, or one other 
public place, within the town, not less than seven days be- 
fore the day appointed for such meeting. But when, in the 
judgment of the selectmen, the interests of the town require 
a meeting to be held without giving so long a notice, a 
meeting may be called by posting attested copies of the 
warrant in the places above mentioned, and by leaving a 
printed copy thereof at each dwelling-house within the 
*own, at least three days before the time appointed for the 
meeting; provided that in such cases the selectmen shall 
certify that, in their opinion, the interests of the town re- 
quire that a town meeting be called upon a notice of less 
than seven days, which certificate shall be made upon, or at- 
tached to, the original warrant, and shall be served as a 
part thereof. 



171 

ARTICLE II. 

Finances. • 

Section 1. The financial year shall commence wich the 
first day of February and end with the thirty-first day of 
January annually. 

Sect. 2. The town treasurer shall have the custody of 
all funds belonging to the town except sinking funds, trust 
funds and funds for which other provision is made by law; 
and he shall pay no money from the treasury except upon a 
draft signed by a majority of the selectmen, stating the ac- 
count to which the same is chargeable. Such draft shall be 
sufficient authority to the treasurer to pay the same, and 
the payment thereof shall discharge him from all liability 
on account of the money so paid. 

Sect. 3. The water commissioners and all other boards, 
committees and officers shall, on the first day of each month, 
pay to the town treasurer all sums collected by them th 
month previous to the custody of which the treasurer i» 
entitled. 

Sect. 4. A majority of the water commissioners, school 
committee, or of any board, or committee, and any officer 
having charge of the expenditure of an appropriation, shall 
approve in writing all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls 
properly chargeable to such appropriation, and shall trans- 
mit the same with his or their approval to the selectmen. 
All other accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls shall be ex- 
amined by the selectmen and, if proper, shall be approved 
by them. The selectmen shall label all accounts, claims, 
bills and pay-rolls which have been approved either by 
themselves or by the other officers before mentioned, and 
shall keep a record thereof in a book kept for the purpose, 
stating the persons to whom payable, the amounts and 
dates thereof, and the funds, or appropriations, from which 
the same are payable. 

Sect. 5. Drafts signed by a majority of the selectmen, 
stating the accounts to which the same are chargeable, 



♦ 172 

shall be drawn upon the treasurer for the payment of all 
sums by law payable from the treasury to the common- 
wealth or county, final judgments of courts, bonds, notes. 
and scrip of the town and interest thereon and money pay- 
able to the commissioners of the sinking fund and to the 
trustees of the public library; and also for the payment of 
all accounts, claims, bills and pay-rolls which have been 
approved in the manner provided in the previous section 
Such drafts shall not be negotiated, but shall be trans 
nitted by the selectmen directly to the treasurer accom- 
panied by the approved bills or other documents for the 
.settlement of which the drafts are drawn. 

Sect. 6. The treasurer shall file and safely keep all ap- 
proved and receipted accounts, claims, bills, and pay-rolls, 
and all vouchers, cancelled bonds, notes scrip, and otEer 
evidences of indebtedness of the town which have been paid 
from the treasury. 

Sect. 7. No draft shall be drawn by the selectmen un 
less there is sufficient appropriation to pay the same, except 
for sums by law payable to the commonwealth or county, 
final judgments of courts, bonds, notes and scrip of the 
town and interest thereon, and money payable to the com 
missioners of the sinking fund. 

Sect. 8. The selectmen and treasurer respectively shal? 
make a record, in a book kept for the purpose, of each ap 
propriation, with a list of the drafts drawn against such 
appropriation, and shall make a record of all bonds, notes, 
scrip or other evidence of indebtedness of the town, signed 
v countersigned by them. 

Sect. 9. When the bills contracted or approved by any 
board, committee, or officer have exhausted the entire ap- 
propriation for such board, committee or officer, they shall 
incur no further expenditure, except in cases where such 
expenditure may be required by law; and it shall be the 
duty of each board, committee or officer before the close of 
the financial year to approve all accounts, claims, bills and 
pay-rolls chargeable to their appropriation. During the in- 



173 

terval between the thirty-first day of January in each year 
and the time of making the next annual appropriations, 
the selectmen, school committee and water commissioners, 
in order to meet the liabilities of their several dpartments, 
incurred in the carrying on of the work entrusted to them, 
shall have authority to make expenditures and payments 
from the treasury from any available funds therein, and the 
same shall be charged against the next annual appropria- 
tion. Such expenditure and liability incurred for any pur- 
pose shall not exceed one-fourth the entire amount appro- 
priated for that purpose in the previous year. 

Sect. 10. Unless the town shall expressly otherwise 
vote, no extension of water pipes shall be made unless be- 
fore the work of construction is begun one or more of the 
persons whom it is proposed to supply with water by means 
of such extension, shall file with the town clerk a bond with 
sureties satisfactory to the water commissioners, condi- 
tioned to pay to the town for five years next following the 
completion of such extension and the letting of water into 
the same, a sum sufficient, together with the net annual in- 
come from such extension, to amount annually to five per 
centum of the total cost thereof. 



ARTICLE III. 

Town Seal. 

Section 1. The design of the town seal shall be: a circle, 
in the border the words "Lincoln. Incorporated in 1746 as 
a precinct: in 1754 as a Town;" in the center, a shield, in 
the chief or upper part of which on a cross, gules, a fleur- 
de-lis, gold, from the old seal of Lincoln, England, and in 
the base of the shield a view of the present town hall; crest, 
the old chestnut tree standing upon the common in Lincoln; 
in saltire two shepherd's crooks; the device thereof being as 
follows: 



174 



Sect. 2. All deeds and other legal documents made, 
given or entered into by the town requiring a seal shall be 
sealed with the town seal, and signed in behalf of the town 
by a majority of the selectmen. 

Sect. 3. The town clerk shall have the custody of the 
town seal. 

ARTICLE IV. 

Records. 

Section 1. The town clerk shall record in full in a boo] 
kept for the purpose all written contracts, deeds and othei 
instruments to which the town is a party except such in- 
struments as may by law be recorded in the Registry of 
Deeds; and it shall be the duty of any board or officer exe- 
cuting or receiving such written contract, or other instru- 
ment, to deliver the same forthwith to the town clerk for 
the purpose of record. It shall be the duty of the town 
clerk to see that all conveyances of real estate to the town 
are properly recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

Sect. 2. The town clerk shall keep a file of vJLl town re- 
ports, reports of all committees chosen by the tow~\ and all 
original documents relating to the affairs of the tow. which 
may come into his possession. 

ARTICLE V. 

Books. 

Section 1. Books, records and laws received by the town 
from the commonwealth shall be deposited in the public 
library building. 

Sect. 2. It shall be the duty of the town officer by whom 
any book mentioned in the preceding section is received, to 
cause the same to be at once deposited in the public library 
building. 

Sect. 3. Such books may be used by the inhabitants of 
the town within such building, and may be taken therefrom 
upon written receipt to the librarian for a period not ex- 
ceeding one day at any one time for use in any town meet- 
ing, or by or before any committee or official of the town. 



175 
ARTICLE VI. 

Suits and Controversies. 

Section 1. The selectmen may compromise claims and 
suits to which the town is a party, provided that they shall 
act upon the advice of counsel when the amount claimed by 
or against the town exceeds $200.00. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall have, unless it is otherwise 
voted by the town, full authority as agents of the town to 
institute and prosecute suits or other proceedings in the 
name of the town before any tribunal, to appear and repre- 
sent or defend the town before any tribunal in all suits and 
other proceedings against the town or in which the town 
has an interest, to employ counsel for the purpose aforesaid 
and for other purposes when it may be expedient to do so, 
and to take all necessary and proper measures for the pro- 
tection of the interests and rights of the town. 

Sect. 3. If the town shall, at any meeting called for the 
purpose, choose, a committee on claims, such committee 
shall have and exercise exclusively all the powers and 
duties conferred upon the selectmen by the two preceding 
sections. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Reports and Publications by the Town. 

Section 1. The annual reports of the town officers, 
boards and committees shall be prepared in form suitable 
for printing on or before the tenth day of February in each 
year. The selectmen shall cause such reports to be printed 
and distributed to the legal voters of the town seven days 
at least before the annual meeting. 

Sect. 2. The selectmen shall cause to be printed and 
bound each year with the annual reports of the town 
officers, boards and committees, a copy of the records of the 
town meetings during the preceding year; a statement of 
all devises, bequests and donations to the town during the 



176 

preceding year; a list of all laws of the commonwealth ac- 
cepted by the town during the year; all by-laws adopted by 
the town since the preceding annual report; copies of the 
laying out, alteration, locating anew or discontinuance of 
any highway or townway within the limits of the town dur- 
ing the preceding year; and a statement of all outstanding 
bonds, notes and obligations of the town for the payment 
of money. 

Sect. 3. The selectmen shall from time to time cause to 
be printed a sufficient number of copies of the by-laws of 
the town and shall incorporate therewith a list of the laws 
of the commonwealth which have been accepted by the 
town. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Truants. 

Section 1. Any minor being an habitual truant, and any 
child between the ages of seven and fifteen years found 
wandering about the streets or public places within the 
town having no lawful occupation or business, not attend- 
ing school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children 
as persistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations 
of the public schools, may upon conviction thereof be com- 
mitted to the Middlesex County Truant School at Chelms- 
ford, Mass., or to any other place provided by the town 
within its limits, for confinement, instruction, and disci- 
pline. 

ARTICLE IX. 
Public Regulations. 

Section 1. No person shall coast upon any public street 
or part thereof after the selectmen have posted a notice 
prohibiting coasting upon such street or part thereof. 

Sect. 2. No person, unless authorized by law, shall 
break or dig up any part of any street without a written 
permit therefor from the selectmen. Every person who 



177 

after obtaining such permit shall obstruct or render unsafe 
any public street, shall guard the same by a proper fence or 
railing, and by lights during the night time, subject to the 
approval of the selectmen. Such permit may be revoked at 
any time. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be or remain in any doorway, 
or upon any stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection 
from any house or building, or upon or against any wall or 
fence on or near any street or public place, after having 
been requested by the owner or any occupant of the 
premises or by any constable or police officer to remove 
therefrom. 

Sect. 4. No person shall make, write, print, paint, cut or 
post any indecent or obscene marks, words, figures or signs 
upon any fence, building, post, tree or other object exposed 
to public view. 

Sect. 5. No person shall wilfully injure, mar, deface or 
destroy any fence, signboard, guideboard, lamp-post, lamp 
or lantern in any street or public place, nor extinguish any 
street light, nor extinguish or remove any light placed to 
denote an obstruction or a defect in any public street or 
way, without proper authority to do so. 

Sect. 6. Any person who shall offend against any of the 
provisions of this article shall forfeit and pay, for each 
offense, a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

Which said By-Laws being seen and understood by the 
Court, are on this nineteenth day of June, A. D. 1897, ap- 
proved. 

In testimony that the foregoing is a true copy 
of record, I hereto set my hand and affix the seal 
of said Court, this twenty-second day of June, 
A. D. 1897. 

RALPH M. SMITH, Ass't Clerk. 



170 






INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers, 1913-1914 3-5 

Proceedings of Town Meetings, 1913-1914 7-45 

Town Clerk's Report 46-49 

Recommendations for Appropriations 52-53 

Selectmen's Report 52-58 

Auditor's Report 51 

Expenditures for the year 59-73 

Report of Assessors • 94-111 

• Report of Town Treasurer 80 

- Report of the Cemetery Commissioners 129 

, Report of Town Treasurer in account Cemetery Commissioners . 130 

Report of Commissioner of Sinking Fund 81 

Report of Treasurer Commissioners Trust Funds .... 82-90 

Report of Treasurer Bemis Lecture Fund 91-92 

•'Report of Water Commissioners 112-128 

> Report of Tree Warden 131-132 

Report of the Committee on Claims 133-136 

^-Report of Board of Health 93 

Report of Supt. of Streets . 77-79 

k Report of Inspector of Animals . 74-75 

^.Report of Fire Engineers 76 

Report of Trustees of Lincoln Public Library .... 137 

Library Statistics .139 

Report of Treasurer of Lincoln Library 138 

Report of Librarian 140 

List of Accessions to Library 141-147 

School Reports . . 149-164 

School Expenditures 154 

Report of School Committee 151-153 

Report of Superintendent of Schools 155-159 

School Calendar and Statistics 162-163 

Roll of Honor 160-161 

Tabular Statement 164 

Warrant, 1914 165-169 

By-Laws of the Town 170-177 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From February 1, 1914 to February 1, 1915 

ALSO THE 

Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THE YEAR 1914-1915 




BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS 

394 Atlantic Avenue 

1915 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

From February 1, 1914 to February 1, 1915 

ALSO THE 

Reports of the School and other Committees 

FOR THE YEAR 1914-1915 




BOSTON: 

GEO. E. CROSBY CO., PRINTERS 

394 Atlantic Avenue 

1915 



Town Officers, 1914-1915 



Town Clerk. 
GEORGE L. CHAPIN. 

Selectmen and Overseers of the Poor. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 

JOSEPH S. HART. 

Board of Health. 

R. D. DONALDSON Term expires 1915 

MARTIN M. WELCH " " 1916 

EDWARDS W. HERMAN " " 1917 



CHARLES S WHEELER Term expires 1915 

WILLIAM C. PEIRCE ....... " " 1916 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN " " 1917 

Treasurer and Collector of Taxes. 
CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Auditor. 
JAMES W. LENNON. 

Constables. 
JAMES T. LAIRD, GEORGE E. CUNNINGHAM. 

Commissioners of Trust Funds. 

CHARLES S. SMITH Term expires 1915 

C. LEE TODD " " 1916 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1917 



4 

Tree Warden. 
JOHN J. KELLIHER. 

Committee on Claims. 
MOORFIELD STOREY, JULIUS E. EVELETH, 

CHARLES S. WHEELER. 

Trustees for Bemis Fund for Free m Public Lectures. 

EDWARD F. FLINT Term expires 1915 

C. LEE TODD " " 1916 

JULIUS E EVELETH " " 1917 

Trustees of Grammar School Fund. 

CHARLES S. WHEELER, GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH. 

Trustees of Lincoln Library. 

CHARLES F. ADAMS, JOHN F. FARRAR, 

CHARLES LEE TODD. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, Chairman of Selectmen, ex-officio. 
HENRY E. WARNER, Chairman School Committee, ex-officio. 

Registrars. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, JOSEPH S. HART, 

ROBERT D. DONALDSON, GEORGE L. CHAPIN,' 

School Committee. 

ELIZABETH BLODGETT . . . . . Term expires 1915 

ANTHONY J. DOHERTY " " 1916 

HENRY E. WARNER " " 1917 

Wafer Commissioners. 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN . . . . . Term expires 1915 

JOSEPH S. HART " " 1916 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN " " 1917 



5 



Field Drivers. 

ISAAC B. COOK, ISAAC N. MacRAE, 

EDWIN S. BLODGETT. 



Fence Viewers. 
JOHN F. FARRAR, WM. H. SHERMAN, 

Surveyor of Lumber. 
RICHARD A. SHEPARD. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. 
SAMUEL FARRAR, JOHN F. FARRAR. 



Cemetery Commissioners. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN Term expires 1915 

JULIUS E. EVELETH " " 1916 

ROGER SHERMAN ' " 1917 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



Proceedings of the Annual Town Meeting held 
March 2, 1914. 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln, in 
said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify the legal voters of said 
Town of Lincoln, qualified to vote at Town Meeting for 
the transaction of Town affairs, to meet in Bemis Hall 
in said Lincoln, on Monday the second day of March 
next, at 11.30 o'clock A. M. by posting a copy of this 
Warrant by you attested, in each of the Post Offices and 
in some other public place in said Town, seven days at 
least before the said second day of March, then and there 
to act upon the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose a Moderator. 



8 



ART. 2. To bring in their votes for the following 
Town Officers, and any other officers required by law to 
be elected by ballot or otherwise, also any committees, 
commissioners and trustees: 

Three Selectmen for one year. 

One member of the Board of Assessors to be elected 
each year for three years. 

One member of the Board of Health to be elected each 
year for three years. 

One Treasurer for one year. 

One Collector for one year. 

One Auditor for one year. 

Two Constables for one year. 

One Tree Warden for one year. 

One member of the School Committee to be elected 
each year for three years. 

One member of the Board of Water Commissioners to 
be elected each year for three years. 

One member of the Board of Cemetery Commissioners 
to be elected each year for three years. 

Also to vote upon the following question : 

"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this Town?" 

The polls will be open at 12 o'clock noon and may be 
closed at six o'clock P. M. 

ART. 3. To hear and act upon the reports of Town 
Officers, Committees, Commissioners, and Trustees. 

ART. 4. To appropriate money for necessary and 
expedient purposes of the Town and enact anything in 
relation to the same. 

ART. 5. To determine the manner of collecting taxes 
for the ensuing year. 



9 



ART. 6. To determine the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes for the ensuing year. 

ART. 7. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year, beginning February 1, 1914, 
in anticipation of the collection of taxes for the said year, 
such sums of money as may be necessary for the current 
expenses of the Town, but not exceeding the total tax 
levy for the said year, giving the notes of the Town in 
payment therefor payable in one year from the date 
thereof. All debts incurred under authority of this vote 
shall be paid from taxes of the present municipal year. 

ART. 8. To see if the Town will choose a committee 
on claims under the provisions of Section 3, Article 6 
of the By-Laws. 

ART. 9. To see if the Town will vote to petition the 
Bureau of Statistics for an Auditor in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 598 of the Acts of 1910 and 
Amendments thereto. 

ART. 10. To see if the Town will issue water bonds 
pursuant to the Acts of 1907, Chapter 476, and reimburse 
the treasury on account of money paid from the treasury 
pending an issue of bonds on account of payment for 
water construction purposes; also, issue bonds, as 
aforesaid on account of payment for water construction 
purposes, which have been made from current income 
of the water works or take any other action with reference 
to the matter. 

ART. 11. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Fire Engineers to purchase an auto fire truck and 



10 



appropriate the sum of Two Thousand Dollars for the 
purchase of same. 

ART. 12. To see what instruction the Town will give 
the Committee on Claims with reference to the settle- 
ment of the controversy in regard to the Common 
between the Lincoln First Parish and the Town, also to 
see what action the Town will take with reference to 
the schoolhouse located in the center of the Town on 
land, the title to which is to be registered in the Town 
♦by the Land Court, or take any action with reference 
to the matter that the Town may see fit. 

ART. 13. To see if the Town will authorize the Water 
Commissioners to install an electric pump at the Pump- 
ing Station and make provision for the payment of same. 

ART. 14. To see if the Town will extend the electric 
lights from the house of C. Edgar Wheeler to the Weston 
line and appropriate money for the same. 

ART. 15. To see if the Town will install one electric 
light at the bend of the road between the residences of 
R. D. Donaldson and I. N. MacRae. 

ART. 16. To see if the Town will extend the electric 
street lighting system from the house of E. F. Flint 
to the Lexington line and appropriate money for the 
same. 

ART. 17. To see if the Town will accept the pro- 
visions of Section 5, Chapter 536, of the Acts of 1909, or 
any other acts in relation to same. 

ART. 18. To see if the Town will appropriate money 
to reimburse the First Parish and Mr. George L. Chapin 



11 



or either of them for the expenses incurred in connection 
with the registering of title to schoolhouse lot, or take 
any action in relation to the matter. 

ART. 19. To see if the Town will take measures to 
revise of amend or abolish the By-Laws, or take any 
other action with reference to the matter. 

ART. 20. To see if the Town will accept the 
provisions of any act or acts them thereto enabling to 
provide by By-Laws or otherwise for issuing local 
licenses to junk dealers, or take any action with reference 
to the matter. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT 

And make due return of this Warrant, with your 
doings thereon, to the Town Clerk at or before the time 
for the meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this twentieth day of February 
in the year of our Lord one thousand hundred and 
fourteen. 

CHARLES S. SMITH, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
JOHN F. FARRAR, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

Lincoln, February 21,' 1914. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and in the Railroad 
Station seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable. 



12 



The return on the Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, Feb. 21, 1914. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and in the Railroad 
Station seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was 
called to order at 11.30 o'clock, by the Town Clerk, 
who read the Warrant. 

Under 

ARTICLE 1. Voted and chose Charles S. Wheeler, 
Moderator. (The check list was used. ) 

Immediately after the choice of Moderator, the 
meeting adjourned to the Town Hall for the election 
of officers by the Australian Ballot. 

Voted, That the polls remain open until 6.15 P. M. 

Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar were sworn 
as Tellers, and Hermon T. Wheeler and Thomas J. Dee 
as Ballot Clerks. 

The Town Clerk delivered to the Ballot Clerk two 
packages said to contain 400 regular ballots and 100 
School Committee bills, taking a receipt from the Ballot 
Clerks for the same. 

The polls were opened at 12 o'clock M. 

The ballot box was opened and examined previous 
to the opening of the polls, the counter on the same 
showing 0. 

The polls closed at 6.15 P. M. with the counter 
showing 2 3 4 which number corresponded with the 
number of ballots cast. 

The ballots were counted in blocks of fifty and each 
envelope sealed. 



13 



These envelopes together with the Check Lists and 
Total Sheet were sealed in a box provided for the same. 

The meeting then adjourned to November 9, 1914 at 
1 o'clock in Bemis Hall. 

November 9. Met as per adjournment. 

The result of the election held November 2, was 
announced by the Moderator, and the person or persons 
having the largest number of votes were declared elected, 
with the exception of the School Committee. 



The following is the vote as declared : 
ART. 2. For 



Town Clerk.— 




George L. Chapin, sworn, 


160 votes 


Thomas L. Giles, 


1 vote. 


Blank, 


55 votes 


Selectmen. — 




Robert D. Donaldson, sworn, 


146 votes 


John F. Farrar, sworn, 


162 "■ 


Joseph S. Hart, sworn, 


131 " 


Charles S. Smith, 


120 " 


C. Lee Todd, 


3 " 


Assessor, 3 years. — 




William H. Sherman, sworn, 


180 votes 


J. Connan, 


1 vote. 


Blank, 


35 votes 


Treasurer. — 




Roderick B. Laird, 


69 votes 


Charles S. Wheeler, sworn, 


141 " 


Blank, 


6 " 



14 



Collector of Taxes. — 

Charles S. Wheeler, sworn. 
Roderick B. Laird, 
Fritz Cunnert, 
P. Craven, 
Blank, 



187 votes. 
1 vote. 

13 votes. 
1 vote. 

14 votes. 



Auditor. — 

James W. Lennon, 
Blank, 



196 votes. 
20 " 



Constables. — 

George E. Cunningham, sworn, 
James T. Laird, sworn, 
John J. Kelliher, 



120 votes. 
165 " 
92 " 



School Committee.— 
David Farquhar, 
Henry E. Warner, 
Blank, 



113 votes. 
116 " 
5 " 



Water Commissioner, 3 years. 
George L. Chapin, 
Charles S. Smith, 
Blank, 



182 votes. 

2 " 
32 " 



Board of Health, 3 years. — 
Edwards W. Herman, 
M. M. Welch, 
W. A. Blodgett, 
Blank, 



168 votes. 
1 vote. 
1 vote. 
46 votes. 



15 



Tree Warden. — 




John J. Kelliher, 


185 votes. 


E. Farrar, 


1 vote. 


Blank, 


30 votes. 


Cemetery Commissioner, 3 years. — 




Roger Sherman, 


149 votes. 


Edward F. Flint, 


18 " 


Scattering, 


3 " 


Blank, 


46 " 


Commissioner of Trust Funds. — 




Julius E. Eveleth, 


15 votes. 


C. Lee Todd, 


13 " 


Scattering, 


7 " 


Blank, 


178 " 


Shall licenses be granted for the 


sale of intoxicating 


liquors in the town? 




Yes, 


29 votes. 


No, 


138 " 


Blank, 


49 " 



Upon a petition of 13 citizens for a re-count of the 
votes for School Committee, a re-count of these votes 
was made November 6 by the Moderator assisted by 
the Town, Clerk. 

There was no change in the result as delivered at the 
Town Meeting, but exceptions were taken by counsel 
for Mr. Farquhar to two votes counted for Mr. Warner, 
and to the fact that in the re-count of the votes no 
ballot had been disclosed showing that the voters had 
been assisted in voting, although it was claimed two 
voters had been so assisted. 



l(> 



Trustee, Bemis Lectureship for Free Lectures. — 
Julius E. Eveleth. 

Trustee, Bemis Lectureship for Free Lectures.— 

(To fill vacancy caused by death of George Flint. ) 
Edward F. Flint. 

Field Drivers. — 

Isaac B. Cook, sworn. 
Isaac N. MacRae, sworn. 
Edwin S. Blodgett, sworn. 
Charles A. Watson. 
Charles M. Storey. 

Fence Viewers. — 

John F. Farrar, sworn. 
William H. Sherman, sworn. 

Surveyor of Lumber. — 
Richard A. Shepard. 

Measurers of Wood and Bark. — 

Samuel Farrar, sworn. 
John F. Farrar, sworn. 
Harold S. Cousins. 

• 
ART. 3. All of the various reports in the Town 
Report were accepted. 

The Treasurer of the Sinking Fund Commissioners 
made a correction in their report. In the invested funds, 
the report should read — "5,000 Town of Lincoln 4s 
Serial Bonds due 1912 to 1923." 



17 



ART. 4. The following appropriations were made: 



Schools . . . . 

Support of Poor 

Highways and Bridges 

Library — The Dog Tax and 

Interest .... 

Cemeteries — (To be taken from the general 

fund of the Cemetery Commissioners) 

Board of Health 

Tree Warden 

Suppression of Gypsy and Brown Tail Moths 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

Payment of Water Bonds — (To be taken 

from Water Works Treasury ) 
Water Works Sinking Fund — (To be taken 

from Water Works Treasury) . 
Hydrant and other Public Water Service 
Waltham Hospital — Free bed 
Street Lamps .... 
Fire Department 
Schoolhouse Bonds 
Interest, Schoolhouse Bonds 
Suppression of Liquor Nuisance 



$11,000.00 

500.00 

12,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

300.00 

200.00 

500.00 

2,000.00 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 

2,173.37 
2,400.00 

250.00 
1,300.00 

100.00 
3,000.00 
1,480.00 

200.00 



Voted, That the sum of $8,000 be taken from the 
available funds in the Treasury to retire the bonds of 
the new Schoolhouse, or paid into a sinking fund for 
the purpose. 

Voted, That when the bonds of the Water Works 
already voted or to be voted are issued to the amount of 
$6,000 and the Town Treasury reimbursed to that 
amount, that the sum of $6,000 be paid to the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners to retire the bonds of the new 
Schoolhouse, or paid into a Sinking Fund for that 
purpose. 



18 



ART. 5. Voted, To collect the taxes in the same 
way and manner as last year. 

Interest at the rate of 6% a year to be charged on 
all taxes not paid on or before November 1. And the 
Collector is authorized to collect the tax of any person, 
after said first day of November, either by distress or 
imprisonment. 

All taxes remaining unpaid on the 15th of January 
next, are to be collected forthwith, at the cost of the 
delinquent. 

ART. 6. Voted, That the compensation of the 
Collector of Taxes be \ X A% of the amount collected. 

ART 7. Voted, That the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized 
to borrow money from time to time, in anticipation of 
the taxes of the municipal year, beginning Feb. 1, 1914, 
to an amount not exceeding the total levy for the 
said year, and to issue note or notes therefor payable 
within one year. Any debt or debts incurred under 
this vote to be paid from taxes of the said municipal year. 

ART. 8. Voted, To choose a Committee on Claims. 

Voted and chose, Moorfield Storey, Julius E. Eveleth, 
Charles S. Wheeler, Committee on Claims. 

ART. 9. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 10. Voted, To lie on the table. 

ART. 11. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 12. Voted, That the Committee on Claims 
be authorized and requested to exercise its own discretion 
in settling with the Parish the matter relating to the 
Common and Schoolhouse land. 



19 
ART. 13. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ARTS. 14, 15 and 16. Considered together. Voted, 
That the matter be referred to the Selectmen with full 
powers. 

ART. 17. Voted, To pass over the Article. 

ART. 18. Voted, To lie on the table. 

ART. 19. Voted, That the Committee on Claims 
prepare a draft of a change in the By-Laws to conform 
with vote passed by the Town in regard to Town 
Elections. 

ART. 20. No action taken. 

Voted to adjourn. 

Attest : 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

November 10, 1914. John J. Kelliher was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

November 10, 1914. Winslow A. Eaton was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

November 16, 1914. Frank H. Cunningham was this 
day sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



20 



November 20, 1914. Walter E. Sherman was this 
day sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

April 30, 1914. William H. Sherman was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

May 28, 1914. Martin M. Welch was this day sworn 
as Inspector of Animals by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

June 16, 1914. John F. Farrar was this day sworn as 
Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

July 3, 1914. Herbert G. Farrar and Edwin. S. 
Blodgett were this day sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

July 9, 1914. Matthew H. Doherty was this day 
sworn as Sealer of Weights and Measures by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 

July 28, 1914. A List of Jurors was this day mailed 
to the Clerk of the Courts at East Cambridge and one 
to the Clerk of the U. S. Court a£ Boston, Mass. by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



21 

JURY LIST FOR 1914 
as prepared by the Selectmen of Lincoln 

Name P. 0. Address Occupation 

Charles H. Bamforth, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. Carpenter 

Warren K. Blodgett, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. Dairyman 

Michael J. Boyce, So. Lincoln, R. F. D., Farmer 

J. Elliot Bryant, Waltham,R. F. D. Supt. Water Basin 

James T. Calkins, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. R. R. Gateman 

William Costello, Lincoln Clerk 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Jr., Lincoln Farmer 

Charles P. Farnsworth, So. Lincoln Farmer 

Mason P. Hunter, Waltham, R. F. D. Farmer 

Byron Lunt, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. Farmer 

Harry Russ, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. Artist 

Walter E. Sherman, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. Farmer 

Sumner Smith, Lincoln Farmer 

T. Wilbur Smith, Lincoln Farmer 

C. Edgar Wheeler, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. Farmer 

Hermon T. Wheeler, Lexington, R. F. D. Farmer 

Clifford E. Wistrand, So. Lincoln, R. F. D. Clerk 

JOHN F. FARRAR, 
ROBERT D. DONALDSON, 
JOS. S. HART, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

A true copy. 
Attest : 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN 

Town Clerk. 

September 12, 1914. Clarence G. Frost was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



22 



Proceeding of the Primary Election held Sept. 22, 1914. 

WARRANT 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln. 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the inhabitants of said town 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in Town 
Hall, Tuesday, September 22, 1914, at seven o'clock P. M. 
for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Offices for the 
nomination of candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 

Governor, for this Commonwealth. 

Lieutenant-Governor, for this Commonwealth. 

Secretary of the* Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Treasurer and Receiver General, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Auditor of the Commonwealth, for this Common- 
wealth. 

Attorney-General, for this Commonwealth. 

Representative in Congress, for Fifth Congressional 
District. 

Councillor, for Sixth Councillor District. 

Senator, for Fifth Senatorial District. 

One Representative in General Court, for Thirteenth 
Representative District. 

County Commissioner, for Middlesex County. 



23 



And for the election of the following officers : 

District Members of State Committee for each 
political party for the Fifth Senatorial District. 

Members of the Democratic Town Committee. 

Three members of the Republican Town Committee. 

Members of the Progressive Party Town Committee. 

Delegates to State Conventions of Political Parties. 

All the above candidates and officers are to be voted 
for upon one ballot. 

The polls will be open from seven P. M. to nine P. M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof seven days at least before the 
time of said meeting as directed by vote of the town. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 12th day of September, 
A. D. 1914. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
JOSEPH S. HART, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows: 

Lincoln, Sept. 14, 1914. 
I have served this Warrant by posting an attested 
copy in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad 
Stations seven days before date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable. 

Pursuant to the above Warrant the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who read 
the Warrant. 



24 



Thomas L. Giles and Herbert G. Farrar were sworn 
as Tellers, and Hermon T. Wheeler and James W. Lennon 
as Ballot Clerks. 

The polls were opened at 7 o'clock, P. M. with the 
counter on the Ballot Box showing 0. The polls 
were closed at nine o'clock with the counter on the 
Ballot Box showing 3 7 



There were ballots as follows: 

Republican 
Democratic 
Progressive 



21 

9 

7 



The ballots were counted by the officers, with the 
following result, which was announced before the 
adjournment of the meeting. 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 



Samuel W. McCall of Winchester, 
Blank, 


20 votes 
1 vote. 


FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Grafton D. Cushing of Boston, 
August H. Goetting of Springfield, 
Elmer A. Stevens of Somerville, 


9 votes, 
9 " 
3 " 


FOR SECRETARY.— 
Frank L. Brier of Boston, 
William S. Kenny of Boston, 
Albert P. Langtry of Springfield, 
Blank, 


3 votes, 
2 " 
14 " 
2 " 


FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston, 
Frederick E. Pierce of Greenfield, 
Blank, 


8 votes. 
12 " 
1 vote. 



25 



FOR AUDITOR.— 

Alonzo B. Cook of Boston, 
Joseph Monetae of Lawrence, 
Blank, 

FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL.— 
Henry E. Attwell of Lynn, 
James M. Hallowell of Newton, 
John J. Higgins of Somerville, 
James A. Stiles of Gardner, 
Blank, 

FOR CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District- 
John Jacob Rogers of Lowell, 
Blank, 

FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 
Henry C. Mulligan of Natick, 



9 votes. 
11 " 
1 vote. 



3 votes. 

4 " 
12 " 

1 vote. 

1 " 



20 votes. 
1 vote. 



21 votes. 



FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Nathan A. Tufts of Waltham, 20 votes. 

Blank, 1 vote. 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. — 

Immanuel Pfeiffer, Jr., of Bedford, 14 votes. 

John F. Farrar of Lincoln, 1 vote. 

C. O. Sargent of Lincoln, 1 " 

Blank, 5 votes. 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.— 

Frederic P. Barnes of Newton, 3 votes. 

Levi S. Gould of Melrose, 16 " 

Julius Meyers of Cambridge, 1 vote. 

Blank, 1 " 



2(3 



FOR STATE COMMITTEE, Fifth Middlesex District- 

Adelbert B. Messer of Concord, 15 votes. 

James E. Baker of Lincoln, 1 vote. 

Blank, 5 votes. 

FOR DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.— 

W. C. Robus, 3 votes. 

J. F. Farrar, 15 " 

George L. Chapin, 1 vote. 

Blank, 2 votes. 



TOWN COMMITTEE. 
John F. Farrar, 
Charles S. Smith, 
W. C. Robus, 
Chester H. Sherman, 
R. D. Donaldson, 
Scattering, 
Blank, 



13 votes 


9 


u 


5 


u 


5 


it 


4 


a 


8 


a 


A 


a 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 
M. Storey of Lincoln, 



8 votes, 
1 vote. 



FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Edward P. Barry of Boston, 8 votes. 

Blank, 1 vote. 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Frank J. Donahue of Boston, 
Blank, 



8 votes. 
1 vote. 



27 



FOR TREASURER.— 

Frederick W. Mansfield of Boston, 
Blank, 

FOR AUDITOR.— 

Frank H. Pope of Leominster, 
Blank, 

FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.- 

Thomas J. Boynton of Everett, 
Blank, 

FOR CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District — 
Joseph O'Connor of Lowell, 
Blank, 

FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District - 
Joseph J. Hogan of Lowell, 
Blank, 



8 votes. 
1 vote. 



7 votes. 
2 " 



7 votes. 
2 " 



7 votes. 
2 " 



7 votes. 
2 " 



FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District.— 

Warren L. Bishop of Wayland, 1 vote. 

Patrick J. Duane of Waltham, 6 votes. 

Blank, 2 " 

FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 
13th Middlesex District. — 

Winthrop H. Fairbank of Sudbury, 8 votes. 

Blank, 1 vote. 



FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.- 
Charles F. McCarthy of Marlborough, 5 votes. 

Peter J. McLaughlin of Cambridge, 1 vote. 

William H. Walsh of Framingham, 2 votes. 

Blank, 1 vote. 



28 



STATE COMMITTEE.— 

Bernard W. Stanley of Waltham, 
Blank, 



8 votes. 
1 vote. 



FOR DELEGATE TO STATE CONVENTION.- 
Anthony J. Doherty of Lincoln, 7 votes. 



Blank, 



1 vote. 



TOWN COMMITTEE. 
Martin M. Welch, 
Anthony J. Doherty, 
C. Lee Todd, 
Patrick F. Corrigan, 
Thomas J. Dee, 
Blank, 



6 votes. 

5 

6 

6 

7 
15 



PROGRESSIVE PARTY 



FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Joseph Walker of Brookline, 
Blank, 



6 votes, 
1 vote. 



FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR. 
James P. Magenis of Boston, 
Blank, 



6 votes. 
1 " 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Russell A. Wood of Cambridge, 
Blank, 



6 votes. 
1 vote. 



FOR TREASURER. 

Daniel J. Murphy of Lawrence, 
Blank, 



5 votes. 
2 " 



29 



FOR AUDITOR.— 

Frederick P. Glazier of Hudson. 
Blank, 



6 votes. 
1 vote. 



FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.- 

John Hildreth of Holyoke, 
Blank, 



6 votes. 
1 vote. 



FOR CONGRESSMAN, Fifth DistricL- 

William N. Osgood of Lowell, 6 votes. 

Blank, 1 vote. 



FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth DistricL- 
Harrie C. Hunter of Marlborough, 
Blank, 



6 votes. 
1 vote. 



FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District. 
Frederick R. S. Mildon of Marlborough, 
Blank, 



5 votes. 
2 " 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

13th Middlesex District. 

Joseph S. Hart of Lincoln, • 7 votes. 

FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex.— 
George A. Goodwin of Cambridge, 6 votes. 

Blank, \ vote. 



STATE COMMITTEE.— 

Frank Peirce of Cambridge, 
Blank, 



2 votes. 



30 



FOR DELEGATE TO STATE 
Stephen H. Blodgett, 
James T. Laird, 
Hermon T. Wheeler, 



CONVENTION. - 

6 votes. 

6 "■ 
6 " 



TOWN COMMITTEE.- 

Edwin S. Blodgett, 
Stephen H. Blodgett, 
Frank Cunningham, 
Wendell D. Crowell, 
Edward Graf, 
Joseph S. Hart, 
Walter W. Johnson, 
James T. Laird, 
Roderick B. Laird, 
Patrick J. Lennon, 
Edwin B. Rice, 
Harry Russ, 
E. Irving Smith, 
Hermon T. Wheeler, 



votes. 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk, 



31 



October 10, 1914. Lorenzo E. Brooks was this day 
sworn as Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN 

Town Clerk- 



October 12. James E. Baker was this day sworn as 
Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



October 23. James J. Kenna was this day sworn as 
Special Police by 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



32 



Proceedings of the State Election held November 3, 1914. 

WARRANT 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To any Constable in the Town of Lincoln, in said County : 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
you are hereby required to notify and warn the in- 
habitants of the Town of Lincoln, duly qualified to 
vote in the election of State and County Officers, to 
assemble at Bemis Hall, on Tuesday, November 3rd, 
at seven o'clock in the forenoon, to give in their votes 
for the following officers, viz. : Governor, Lieutenant- 
Governor, Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney- 
General, Representative in Congress Fifth District, 
Councillor Sixth District, Senator Fifth District, 
Representative in the General Court Thirteenth Middle- 
sex District, County Commissioner, and any other officer 
required by law to be chosen in the month of November 
of the current year. 

All officers enumerated above are to be designated 
and voted for on one ballot, and also the following 
questions : — 

QUESTIONS 

Acceptance of Chap. 217, Acts of 1914, entitled, 
"An Act relative to vacations of laborers employed by 
cities and towns." 



33 



Acceptance of Chap. 688, Acts of 1914, entitled, 
"An Act to make Saturday a half-holiday for laborers, 
workmen and mechanics employed by or on behalf of 
the Commonwealth and otherwise to regulate their 
employment." 

Acceptance of Chap. 790, Acts of 1914, entitled, 
"An Act to abolish the enrollment of members of 
political parties and to limit the membership of ward 
and town committees." 

The polls to be opened at seven o'clock A. M., and 
may be closed at four o'clock P. M., and you are directed 
to serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy thereof 
in each of the Post Offices and one of the churches, or in 
some other public place, seven days at least before the 
day appointed for said meeting, and to make seasonable 
return thereof with your doings thereon to the Town 
Clerk. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT. 

Given under our hands, this twenty-second day of 
October, in the year of our Lord, nineteen hundred and 
fourteen. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
JOS. S. HART, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 

The return on the Warrant is as follows: — 

Lincoln, Oct. 26, 1914. 

I have served this Warrant by posting an attested copy 
in each of the Post Offices and one in the Railroad Station 
seven days before the date of said meeting. 

JAMES T. LAIRD, 

Constable. 



34 



Pursuant to the above Warrant, the meeting was called 
to order by the Chairman of the Selectmen, who read 
the Warrant. 

Thomas L. Giles and Clifford E. Wistrand were sworn 
as Tellers and Hermon T. Wheeler and James W. Lennon 
as Ballot Clerks. 

The Ballot Box was opened and examined, the counter 
on the same showing 0. The box was then locked 
and the keys given into the custody of the constable. 

At 2.50 o'clock P. M. the Ballot Box was opened, 
50 ballots removed, and the box again locked. The 
ballots were counted in blocks of 50 and sealed. 

The counting continued until all the ballots had been 
removed from the Ballot Box. 

The polls were closed at 4.30 o'clock, the counter on 
the Ballot Box showing 2 1 ballots, which number 
tallied with the number of votes cast. 

The result of the ballot was announced in open meeting. 

The ballots cast, together with the check lists used 
by the Ballot Clerks and Tellers, and the Tally Sheets 
and Total Tally Sheet were sealed in the box provided, 
in open meeting. 



The vote is as follows: — 

FOR GOVERNOR.— 

Alfred H. Evans of Hadley, 1 vote. 

Samuel W. McCall of Winchester, 112 votes. 

Samuel C. Roberts of Springfield, 3 " 

Joseph Walker of Brookline, 26 " 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg, 57 " 

Blank, 2 " 



35 



FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR.— 

Edward P. Barry of Boston, 57 votes. 

Grafton D. Gushing of Boston, 116 

Arthur Howard of Salem, 2 

James P. Magenis of Boston, 19 

Sylvester W. McBride of Watertown, 3 

Blank, 4 



FOR SECRETARY.— 

Percy P. Ball of North Attleborough, 2 

Frank J. Donahue of Boston, 56 

James W. Holden of New Bedford, 2 

Albert P. Langtry of Springfield, 107 

William G. Merrill of Maiden, 2 

Russell A. Wood of Cambridge, 25 

Blank, 7 



votes. 



FOR TREASURER.— 

Charles L. Burrill of Boston, 
Joseph M. Caldwell of Milford, 
Frederick Fosdick of Fitchburg, 
Thomas A. Frissell of Hinsdale, 
Karl Linstrand of Lynn, 
Frederick W. Mansfield of Boston^ 
Blank, 



112 votes. 

1 vote. 
22 votes. 

1 vote. 

1 " 
57 votes. 



FOR AUDITOR.— 

Alonzo B. Cook of Boston, 
Daniel R. Donovan of Springfield, 
John Drysdale of North Adams, 
Frederick P. Glazier of Hudson, 
Frank H. Pope of Leominster, 
Blank, 



96 votes. 
3 " 
1 vote. 

25 votes 

66 " 

10 " 



30 



FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL.- 
Henry C. Atwell of Lynn, 
Thomas J. Boynton of Everett, 
John Hildreth of Holyoke, 
Howard B. Rand of Haverhill, 
John Weaver Sherman of Boston, 
William Taylor of Worcester, 
Blank, 

FOR CONGRESSMAN, Fifth District.— 
J. Joseph O'Connor of Lowell, 
William N. Osgood of Lowell, 
John Jacob Rogers of Lowell, 
Blank, 

FOR COUNCILLOR, Sixth District- 
John J. Hogan of Lowell, 
Harrie C. Hunter of Marlborough, 
Henry C. Mulligan of Natick, 
Blank, 

FOR SENATOR, Fifth Middlesex District. 

Patrick J. Duane of Waltham, 
Frederick R. S. Mildon of Marlborough, 
Nathan A. Tufts of Waltham, 
Blank, 



106 


votes. 


59 


t.t 


22 


ti 


3 


it 


2 


tt 


1 


vote. 


8 votes. 


55 votes. 


21 


tt 


117 


a 


8 


it 


49 votes, 


37 


u 


94 


a 


21 


a 


54 votes 


18 


tt 


119 


i " 


10 


a 



FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 

Thirteenth Middlesex District. — 

Winthrop H. Fairbanks of Sudbury, 41 votes. 

Joseph S. Hart of Lincoln, 104 " 

Immanuel Pfeiffer, Jr. of Bedford, 52 " 

Blank, 4 " 



37 



FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Middlesex County- 
George A. Goodwin of Cambridge, 26 votes. 
Levi S. Gould of Melrose, 102 " 
Charles F. McCarthy of Marlborough, 58 " 
Blank, 15 " 

Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and fourteen, entitled, "An act 
relative to vacations' of laborers employed by cities and 
towns" be accepted? 

Yes, 65 votes. 

No, 64 " 

Blank, 72 " 

Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and fourteen, to make Saturday a 
half-holiday, without loss of pay, for laborers, workmen 
and mechanics employed by or on behalf of the common- 
wealth and otherwise to regulate their employment, 
be accepted? 

Yes, 83 votes. 

No, 64 " 

Blank, 64 " 

Shall the act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and fourteen providing for the abolition 
of party enrollment at primary elections, be accepted? 

Yes, 78 votes. 

No, 32 " 

Blank, 91 " 

Voted to adjourn. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



38 



Vote of the Thirteenth Middlesex District for Repre- 
sentative in the General Court, as determined at the 
Town Clerk's meeting held at Concord, Nov. 13, 1914. 





Bed. 


Con. 


Lin. 


Sud. 


Way. 


West. 


Total 


Winthrop H. 
















Fairbanks of 
















Sudbury, 


56 


281 


41 


85 


151 


56 


670 


Joseph S. Hart 
















of Lincoln, 


64 


201 


104 


16 


43 


50 


478 


Immanuel 
















Pfeiffer, Jr., 
















of Bedford, 


138 


417 


52 


86 


215 


262 


1,170 


Blank, 


13 


40 


4 


2 


27 


9 


95 


Total, 


271 


939 


201 


189 


436 


377 


2,413 



Two certificates of election were filled out for Immanuel 
Pfeiffer, Jr., of Bedford and signed by 

Abbott R. Webber, Town Clerk of Bedford. 
William D. Cross, Town Clerk of Concord. 
George L. Chapin, Town Clerk of Lincoln. 
Frank F. Gerry, Town Clerk of Sudbury. 
Warren L. Bishop, Town Clerk of Wayland. 
George W. Cutting, Town Clerk of Weston. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



39 



There have been recorded during the year ending- 
Dec. 31, 1914, 25 Births, 9 Marriages, 15 Deaths. 



Births Registered. 



Date of Birth. 


Name of Child. 


Name of Parents. 


Feb. 5, 1914. 


Lena Butcher. 


Ralph E. and Annie (Gilbert. ) 


Oct. 21, 1913. 


Louise Ann Naff. 


Fred and Mary A. (Flood. ) 


Feb. 14, 1914. 


John Joseph Morrisey. 


John J. and Annie (Murphy. ) 


May 25, 1913. 


Elizabeth Avard. 


George and Margaret M. (Anderson.) 


Aug. 25, " 


Eva Elizabeth Coburn. 


Edwin S. and Minnie (Meyer. ) 


Feb. 20, 1914. 


James Vincent Lennon. 


James W. and Frances M. (Carey. ) 


Feb. 22, " 


Bennett. 


William J. and Ellen M. (Flood. ) 


July 2, 1912. 


Julia Kennedy. 


John and Honor (Cole. ) 


May 24, 1914. 


Ernest Cook. 


Isaac and Delia (Casey. ) 


April 27, " 
May 1, " 


William Henry Davis. 


William H. and Alice M. (MacPhee. ) 


Margaret Gaffey. 


Leo W. and Marion (Whittier. ) 


May 18, " 


Jean Chapman. 


Duncan G. and Lily (Topliss.) 


March 8, " 


Jean Elizabeth Donaldson. 


Robert D. and Charlotte H. (Alcock. ) 


April 4, " 


Adelaide Nason Blodgett. 


Edwin S. and Marion, (Loring. ) 


June 9, " 


Charles Francis Foreman. 


Charles F. and Annie M. (Limond. ) 


June 18, " 


Helen Marguerite Wistrand 


Godfrey and Anna (Johnson. ) 


Aug. 15, " 


Emma Jane Flemming. 


Charles L. and Margaret (Pressler. ) 


Sept. 7, " 


Pederson. 


Andrew and Sarah Anne (Holmes. ) 


Sept. 14, " 


Edward Francis Flint. 


Edward F. and Josephine M. (Ritchie.) 


Sept. 23, " 


Frank Seeckts. 


Albert and Marion (Ehlert. ) 


Oct. 3, " 


Elizabeth Farrar. 


Herbert G. and Edith (Biggs. ) 


Oct. 4, " 


Ethel Lillian McLean. 


Hector and Lucy (Corkum. ) 


Oct. 13, " 


Ada Violet Gilbert. 


Louis J. and Ada K. (Beebe.) 


Oct. 22, " 


Alice Veronica Rooney. 


John W., Jr. and Mary C. (Shelby. ) 


Dec. 11, " 


Johnson. 


Ella Johnson. 



40 



Marriages Registered 



Date of Marriage. 


Names. 


Residence. 


April 


4, 1914. 


1 
I 


Charles Morris. 
Winifred Clamp. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Sept. 


1, " 


{ 


Richard A. Shepard. 
Elida J. Hueston. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Sept. 


7, " 


{ 


John B. Lennon. 
Elizabeth MacDonald. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Oct. 


1, " 


{ 


Michelo Cirasso. 
Armelia Morganello. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Sept. 


9, " 


{ 


Julian Dana de Cordova 
Alice Helene Miller Jones. 


Lincoln 
Brookline. 


Oct. 


6, " 


{ 


Anthony J. Doherty. 
Josephine C. Yates. 


Lincoln. 
New Bedford. 


Nov. 


1, " 


{ 


Frederick J. Smith, 
Estella S. Heath. 


Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 


Nov. 


11, " 


{ 


Arthur Roy Patterson. 
Mary Agnes Delory. 


St owe. 
Lincoln. 


Dec. 


17, " 


{ 


Charles Arthur Beckett. 
Harriet Louise Spross. 


Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 



41 



Deaths Registered 



Date of Death. 


Name. 


Y. 


Age 

M. 


D. 


Jan. 2,1914. 


Charles W. Piper. 


34 


5 


18 


Feb. 7, " 


George Flint. 


83 


2 


11 


Feb. 22, " 


Bennett. 








March 7, " 


Martha E. Whitney. 


64 


6 


3 


March 20, " 


Mary Macaulay. 


65 


— 


— 


May 5, " 


James Lorenzo Calkins. 


39 


8 


17 


June 7, " 


Charles Foster Bunker. 


62 


2 


22 


July 3, " 


George Washington Browning. 


83 


11 


18 


July 30, " 


Wallace M. Brooks. 


57 


4 


27 


Sept. 27, " 


John Denton. 


42 


— 


— 


Oct. 11, " 


Pederson. 




1 


4 


Oct. 13. " 


Rosanna Conway. 


80 


— 


— 


Nov. 5, " 


Esther Harding. 


74 


9 


22 


Nov. 7, " 


Ellen O'Brien. 


47 


10 


7 



42 



The attention of the citizens is called to Extract 
from the Revised Laws in regard to the report of Births. 

EXTRACT FROM THE REVISED LAWS Chap. 29 
AS AMENDED BY CHAP. 280, ACTS OF 1912 

Sect. 1. Physicians and midwives shall, within forty- 
eight hours after the birth of every child in cases of 
which they were in charge, mail or deliver to the clerk 
or registrar of the city or town in which the birth oc- 
curred a notice stating the date and place of the birth, 
giving the street number, if any, the number of the 
ward in a city and the family name. Failure to mail or 
deliver the said notice shall be pimished by a fine not 
exceeding twenty-five dollars for each offence. The 
notice required by this Section need not be given if the 
notice required by the following Section is given within 
forty-eight hours after the birth occurs. 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after the birth of a 
child, and every householder, within forty days after the 
birth of a child in his house, shall cause notice thereof to 
be given to the clerk of the City or Town, in which such 
child is born. 

Sect. 8. A parent, keeper, superintendent or other 
person who is required by Section 6 to give or cause to be 
given notice of a birth or death, who neglects so to do for 
ten days after the time limited therefor, shall forfeit not 
more than five dollars for such offence. 



43 



DOGS LICENSED IN 1914. 

There have been 140 licenses issued as follows: — 
112 Males, 21 Females, 5 Spayed Females, 2 Kennels 
for which $411.00 has been paid to the County Treasurer. 



. HUNTERS' LICENSES. 

There have been 57 Resident Hunters' Licenses issued 
for which $57.00 has been paid to the Commissioners 
on Fisheries and Game. 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 

Town Clerk. 



45 



AUDITOR'S REPORT 

I have examined the accounts of the Town Treasurer 
and also Treasurer of the Sinking Fund. I have seen 
vouchers for all money paid and all securities of the 
Town. 

Following is an account of the money paid by the 
Treasurer on the Selectmen's approval. 

JAMES W. LENNON, 

Auditor. 



46 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN 



The Board of Selectmen organized with John F. Farrar 
as Chairman and Robert D. Donaldson as Secretary. 

The last year has gone along quietly and comfortably, 
and no special Town Meetings have been demanded. 
A special effort has been made to keep the expenditures 
within the appropriations, but in some instances necessity 
has required an overdraft. The miscellaneous appro- 
priation was $5,000.00 and the expenditures $6,219.25. 
Handling forest fires cost $407.20. 

The school committee conferred with the selectmen 
in regard to the South School building, and certain 
repairs were decided necessary. New cement work, 
drain pipe and dry wells were required to keep water 
out of the cellar and prevent the walls from caving in; 
new heating apparatus to replace the old furnace; the 
roof needed re-shingling, and some work inside such as 
painting and other minor repairs. We agreed that this 
work should be done; and as appropriations for the 
support of schools did not include the repairs on school 
buildings, this amount, so far amounting to $364.96, 
has been paid from the miscellaneous appropriation. 

The driveway separating the School property from 
the Telephone property has been thoroughly repaired, 
and the Telephone Company has as per agreement paid 
$25.00 as their share. The balance, together with the 
resurfacing of the rest of the drive in the rear of the 



47 



building, amounting to $50.00, has been paid from the 
miscellaneous appropriation. 

The road from the corner of the Telephone lot to a 
point opposite the house of Mr. Roger Sherman has 
been widened, a sidewalk and retaining wall built. 
This was a very narrow piece of way; and as quite a 
number of children walked in that direction and were 
obliged to keep in the highway, owing to the sloping 
banks on either side of the road, the widening of the 
road was necessary for safety. This expense, so far 
amounting to $207.17, has been paid from the mis- 
cellaneous account. 

Counsel fees on water bond issue case ($264.50) and 
counsel fees on account of school committee election 
($150.00) have also been paid from the miscellaneous 
account. The above items amounting to $1,443.83 
deducted from the total expenditures will leave the 
account within the appropriation. 

The highways have been in charge of Mr. W. H. 
Sherman. He has kept us in touch with the work as 
it went along, and although it is hard to keep roads up, 
owing to the class and amount of travel, our roads are 
in good average condition. Five new horses and one 
set of harness were purchased for the equipment of the 
department at an expense of $1,733.25. The horses while 
in the barn are in the care of Charles P. Farnsworth, 
which makes them reasonably safe in case of sickness 
or fire. 

The road at the foot of the hill near Mr. Browning's 
was crooked and very narrow. The town has lengthened 
out the culvert, re-laid the old portion; and Mr. Browning 
has given labor, material and land enough to make this 
location safe and convenient, and it is a permanent 
improvement. The department has spent $12,388.28 
and has approximately $550.00 to its credit, leaving an 
unexpended balance of $161.72. 



48 



The town voted at the last annual meeting to leave 
the question of street lighting extensions in the hands 
of the selectmen, with power to act. Extensions have 
been made as follows: from Kidder's corner to Weston 
line, 12 lights; from Snelling's corner to Baker Bridge, 
5 lights; on Snelling road, 2 lights; at corner of cemetery 
near Town Hall, 1 light; making 20 lights in all at a 
cost of approximately $13.05 each, making an additional 
cost of approximately $261.00 more expense per year 
for street lights. Expense of street lighting to Novem- 
ber 1, 1914, $1,161.36; for November and December, 
paid after January 1, 1915, $291.23; making the total 
cost for the year $1,452.59. 

During the year alterations have been made in the 
Town Hall to meet the requirements of the State Police. 
Ash barrels have also been provided for the Hall, so 
now the depositing of ashes and rubbish in the rear of 
the building has been discontinued. 

Support of Poor 

Several demands were made to the Overseers of the 
Poor from hospitals, cities and other towns for support 
of persons they claimed belonged to Lincoln. We have 
been able so far to ward off all liability. 

Silent Poor 

One hundred dollars have been received from the 
Abbie J. Steam's fund for the silent poor and properly 
placed. 

License to Slaughter 

Was granted to C. 0. Sargeant and C. N. Cunnert on 
locations approved by the Board of Health. 



49 



Appointments 

Burial Agent, Roger Sherman. 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, Matthew H. Doherty. 

Special Police, James E. Baker, John W. Rocks, 
John F. Farrar, William A. Harding, John J. Kelliher, 
Walter Sherman, Winslow Eaton, Frank Cunningham. 
James J. Kenna, Clarence Frost, Lorenzo E. Brooks, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Edwin S. Blodgett. 

Inspector of Animals, Martin M. Welch. 

Ballot Clerks and Tellers at Primary and Annual 
State Election, James W. Lennon. Thomas L. Giles, 
Herbert G. Farrar and Herman Wheeler and Clifford 
Wistrand. 

Superintendent of Streets, William H. Sherman. 

Janitor of Public Buildings and Caretaker of Public 
Grounds, Edward Bannon. 

Forest Warden, J. J. Kelliher. 

The following table gives the appropriations made by 
the Town for 1914, and the appropriations recommended 
by the Board to be made at the next Annual Meeting, 
for the year ending December 31, next: — 







The Selectmen 






recommend the 






following appro- 




Appropriations 


priations for the 




for 1914 


ensuing year 


For Schools, 


$11,000.00 


$12,500.00 


Support of Poor, 


500.00 


500.00 


Highways and Bridges, 


12,000.00 


12,000.00 


Library, Dog Tax, and, 


500.00 


1,000.00 


Interest, 


500.00 


500.00 


Cemeteries, 


200.00 


500.00 


Board of Health, 


200.00 


200.00 


Tree Warden, 


500.00 


500.00 


Suppression of Gypsy and 






Brown Tail Moths, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 



50 



Miscellaneous Expenses, $5,000 . 00 $5,000 . 00 

Payments of Water Bonds, 2,000 . 00 1 ,000 . 00 

Sinking Fund, Water, 2,173.37 1,500.00 
Hydrant and other public 

water service, 2,400 . 00 2,400 . 00 
Waltham Hospital, Free 

Bed, 250.00 250.00 

Street Lamps, 1,300.00 1,600.00 

Fire Department, 100 . 00 100 . 00 
Payment new Schoolhouse 

Bonds, 3,000.00 3,000.00 
Payment Interest New 

Schoolhouse Bonds, 1 ,480 . 00 1 ,360 . 00 
Suppression of Liquor 

Nuisance, 200.00 200.00 



Schoolhouse Case 

The Centre Schoolhouse, erected in 1870, has not 
been used as a town schoolhouse since January, 1909, 
and, ever since, the ownership of the land under it has 
been the subject of contention. For the information 
of the townspeople, we state the facts as briefly as is 
consistent with accuracy. 

The Town brought a petition to the Land Court to 
have registered in the Town, title to a tract, including 
the building, 70 feet x 100 feet. There were many and 
protracted hearings and, as a result, the Court reached 
the conclusion that the Town was entitled to a lot, 
40 feet x 57 feet, which excluded a considerable part 
of the building. A Bill of Exceptions was filed by 
counsel for the Town, but was dismissed by the Land 
Court. 

So far as rendered to, and paid by the Town to date, 



51 



the bills for legal services and disbursements in this 
case are as follows : — 

1911. Dec. 11. A. J. Doherty, services on 

account of old Schoolhouse $250 00 

1912. July 22. Horace F. Tuttle, Surveying 15 00 

1912. July 22. C. S. Wheeler, cash paid for 

fees in Land Court, 26 00 

1913. July 14. Henry F. Bryant, Surveying 

and attendance at Land 

Court, 
Mabel M. Brewerton, Lam 

Court, stenographer, 
1913. Sept. 8. G. A. A. Pevey, Legal services 

at Land Court, 
1913. Sept. 8. Anthony J. Doherty, Legal 

services at Land Court, 
1913. Oct. 13. G. A. A. Pevey, Counsel fees, 
1913. Oct, 13. A. J. Doherty, Counsel fees, 

$2,289 48 

The Water Works Bond Case 

At the annual meeting held on March 8, 1913, the 
town voted to issue certain bonds on account of payments 
for water construction purposes to the amount of six 
thousand (6,000) dollars. Thereafter a petition was 
brought by ten tax payers or more to restrain the town 
and its Treasurer from issuing these bonds. 

The case was heard before the Supreme Judicial Court, 
first before a single justice and again before the full Court, 
and it was decided that the town and its Treasurer should 
be enjoined from issuing these bonds. 

The decision in this case is of great importance, not 
only to this town but to all other municipalities and 
has been widely quoted. The point is, that the town 



88 


37 


310 


11 


3 

300 


00 


300 


00 


450 


00 


550 


00 



52 



has no right to issue bonds for improvements in the 
water works which have been made and paid for without 
any declaration of intention, at the time the expenditures 
were voted, to borrow money and to issue bonds therefor. 

The petition by the tax payers to the Supreme Judicial 
Court was filed May 19, 1913 and the final decision was 
rendered March 31, 1914. The town appeared by 
counsel under the direction of the Committee on Claims 
and the Town Treasurer also appeared by the same 
counsel. 

The town was enjoined from issuing bonds for the 
purposes set forth in the vote of March 8,1913; and 
inasmuch as a motion was made at the annual meeting 
of 1914 to issue bonds for the same purpose, it seems to 
us proper to draw attention in this report to the decision 
of the court. As the decision contains a statement of 
all the material facts, we shall quote it in full. It is 
to be found in Volume 217 of the Massachusetts Reports 
at page 336 under the title of, George L. Chapin and 
Others vs. Inhabitants of Lincoln and Another. The 
decision of the Court follows: — 

"DeCOURCY, J. This is a petition brought under 
R. L. c. 25 § 100, by not less than ten taxpayers to 
restrain the town of Lincoln and its Treasurer from 
issuing certain water bonds. It is before us on the 
report of the single justice* who heard the case. 

The tenth article of the warrant for the town meeting 
held by adjournment on March 8, 1913, was as follows: 
"To see if the town will issue water bonds pursuant to 
the Acts of 1907, Chapter 476, and reimburse the 
treasury on account of money paid from the treasury 
pending an issue of bonds on account of payments for 
water construction purposes; also, issue bonds, as 
aforesaid on account of payments for water construction 
purposes, which have been made from current income 

*Braley, J., who in reporting the case to this court for determination, 
stated the facts found by him and his opinion that an injunction should 
issue as prayed for. 



53 



of the water works or take any other action with reference 
to the matter." Under this article it was voted, by at 
least two thirds of those present and voting: "That the 
town treasurer be authorized and directed to issue the 
bonds of the town for the sum of six thousand dollars, 
each bond to be for five hundred dollars, to bear interest 
at a rate not exceeding four per cent per annum, to be 
dated June 1, 1913, and to be payable one on the first of 
June in each of the next twelve years; for the purpose 
of paying the expense of extensions of the water system 
of the town. Said bonds to be signed by the treasurer 
and countersigned by the selectmen and to be de- 
nominated Lincoln Water Bonds." 

The single justice has made a finding that the purpose 
of issuing bonds under this vote was to reimburse the 
town for sums that had been appropriated in earlier years 
for three extensions of the water works of the town ; one 
of the extensions having been made under an article 
of the annual meeting of March, 1911, and the other two 
under articles of the annual meeting of March, 1912. 
And he has expressly found that all of these extensions 
"had been made and paid for before the vote of 
March 8, 1913, from money raised by taxation." 

In neither of these three instances did the town express 
any intention to provide funds for the proposed municipal 
improvement by borrowing money under its water acts, 
Sts. 1872, c. 188; 1907, c. 476. It did not even undertake 
to vote that the money in the town treasury should be 
used temporarily for water purposes "pending an issue 
of bonds," as it appears to have done on some other 
occasions. In fact in the second and most important 
case, when it appropriated $4,267, specific provision 
was made for the payment of this sum without an issue 
of bonds, namely, by using the special water works 
sinking fund and the receipts from the water works. 

There is no indebtedness incurred or contemplated 
by the town to warrant the proposed loan. There is no 
unfunded debt on account of the extensions referred to. 
It does not follow that because the town might have 
borrowed the money for these extensions at the time 
they were voted, that it can do so now after they are 
paid for. See St. 1913, c. 719, as amended by St. 1914, 
c. 143. 



54 



It appears that since March, 1904, the town treasurer 
has kept an account of the money received from and 
paid on account of the water system, separate from the 
accounts of the other departments; and apparently 
some attempt has been made to treat the water works 
as a self sustaining business enterprise. In accordance 
with this course of procedure, it is sought to regard this 
money that was expended for construction purposes on 
the water works as a liability of the water department 
to the town. With the wisdom of such a business policy 
we are not concerned. 

As a matter of law the defendant is a single municipal 
entity, and the rights exercised and the duties performed 
by its several departments are those conferred or imposed 
upon the town itself. The municipality owns the water 
system, and the disbursements it made for construction 
purposes were actually payments of its own indebtedness. 
Under existing legislation applicable to the defendant, 
one of the departments cannot occupy the relation of 
debtor to the town of which it is an integral part. 
See Sinclair v. Mayor of Fall River, 198 Mass. 248. 
We are in accord with the opinion of the single justice, 
that an injunction should issue as prayed for, restraining 
the respondents from issuing bonds under the vote passed 
March 8, 1913. 

Ordered accordingly. 

A. J. DOHERTY, for the respondents. 
E. I. SMITH, for the -petitioners. 



The Special Schoolhouse Sinking Fund 

At the beginning of the financial year we found that 
certain money had been appropriated for the purpose 
of creating a special sinking fund to provide for the 
payment of the schoolhouse bonds, and that that 
money had been placed in the hands of the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners for investment. About $5,000.00 
of the fund has been invested in the Lincoln Water Works 
bonds and what additional amount has been paid over 



55 



to the Commissioners and is now held by them we are 
unable to state. 

We were in doubt whether the money so appropriated 
and invested by the Sinking Fund Commissioners was 
properly used as a part of any sinking fund authorized 
by law, and we therefore asked the opinion of counsel as 
to this matter. 

As we are advised the schoolhouse sinking fund has 
no legal existence, because the schoolhouse bonds are 
serial bonds and do not require a sinking fund to be 
raised or maintained for their retirement. 

The opinion of counsel in this matter is as follows : 

Lincoln, July 10, 1914. 
To the Selectmen of the Town of Lincoln. 
Gentlemen : — 

You have requested me to give my opinion about 
several votes of the town with reference to use of town 
money for a sinking fund to provide for the payment of 
certain schoolhouse bonds. The material votes I under- 
stand to be substantially as follows: 

August 8, 1908, under Article 3 of the warrant, it was 
unanimously voted: 

"That for the purpose of building a new schoolhouse 
the Town Treasurer be and he is hereby authorized to 
issue and sell the bonds of the Town to the aggregate 
principal of $55,000 dated January 1, 1908, and payable 
$3,000 thereof on the first of January in each of the 
years 1909 to 1923 inclusive, and $2,000 thereof on the 
first of January in each of the years 1924 to 1928 inclusive 
bearing interest at the rate of four per cent per annum 
payable semi-annually. Such bonds shall bear on their 
face the words, 'Schoolhouse Loan;' said bonds shall 
be signed by the Treasurer and countersigned by a 
majority of the Selectmen." 



56 

March 3, 1913, under the general article (4) 

"To appropriate money for necessary and expedient 
purposes," etc., it was voted: 

"That $10,000 of available money for the Town 
Treasury be appropriated for the purpose of liquidating 
the debt of the Town on account of the new schoolhouse, 
the bonds to be purchased or a sinking fund established 
at the discretion of the commissioners of the sinking 
and trust funds." 

March 2, 1914 under a similar article, it was voted: 

"That the sum of $8,000 be taken from available 
funds in the treasury to retire the bonds on the new 
schoolhouse, or paid into a sinking fund for that purpose." 

I am informed that the "Commissioners of the 
Sinking and Trust Funds" purporting to act under the 
second of these votes (that of March 3, 1913 ) have 
already received from the treasurer upwards of $7,000 
which they now hold as a special sinking fund against 
the schoolhouse indebtedness, and that $5,000 of this 
money has been invested in the water works bonds of 
the town, while upwards of $2,000 remains as cash in 
their hands. 

Further, I understand that these commissioners are 
the regular sinking fund commissioners of the town, and 
in that capacity have charge of all lawful sinking funds 
the town has established. 

Upon the foregoing facts the questions you present to 
me are: 

(1 ) May the town legally provide any sinking fund 
whatever for the redemption of the schoolhouse bonds, 
which aggregate $55,000, issued under the vote of 
August 8, 1908? 



57 



(2 ) Are the water bonds of the town, amounting to 
$5,000 (as I am informed), purchased by the sinking 
fund commissioners, outstanding town obligations, or 
are they by reason of such purchase cancelled and paid? 

(3) Is the money now in the hands of the " com- 
missioners" properly there, or should it be in the custody 
of the town treasurer? 

(4 ) What is the proper course for you as selectmen 
to pursue in all the circumstances? 

The first question I shall answer, No. The very 
purpose of a system of proportional payments, such as 
that provided for the annual liquidation of the school- 
house indebtedness, is to avoid a sinking fund. When a 
town adopts the system of proportional annual payments 
of any specific indebtedness it has no authority to 
appropriate money for a sinking fund to be invested and 
managed by commissioners to liquidate that indebted- 
ness. The two systems — that of proportional annual 
payments, and that of providing a sinking fund to 
retire such indebtedness at the end of a certain period, — 
are mutually exclusive; and the law does not permit 
the adoption of both with respect to the same debt. 

(2) The so-called sinking fund is not a sinking fund 
at all, and it is not legally held as a sinking fund by the 
persons purporting to act as sinking fund commissioners. 
At best, they are only an investment committee, without 
any statutory authority whatsoever. If they have 
received and invested monies of the town, they have 
done so only as agents of the town, and not as " Com- 
missioners of the Sinking Funds." Therefore, all bonds 
of the town which they have bought are paid and 
cancelled. Town or city securities may be bought by 
the municipality and kept alive only under the special 
laws relating to sinking funds. A town is a municipal 
entity. (See Chapin vs. Lincoln, 217 Mass. 336. ) 



58 



In my opinion, the water works bonds (amounting to 
$5,000) bought by the sinking and trust fund com- 
missioners, have been paid and cancelled, and can 
never be re-sold or re-issued; and these bonds should 
now be delivered in ordinary course to the town treasurer 
to be dealt with by him as cancelled securities. In no event 
can these " commissioners," whether as a committee or 
otherwise, hold these dead and satisfied bonds as a town 
investment. 

Of course, the selectmen should draw no drafts to pay 
the interest or principal of these water bonds, and the 
town treasurer ought to insist that they be delivered 
into his custody. 

(3) All money of the town in the custody of the 
commissioners, which has come to them by any of the 
votes of the town above quoted is, in my opinion, 
improperly held by them. Such money should at once 
be delivered to the town treasurer. He is the only 
official responsible for it under our By Laws, and with 
respect to whose acts the town is protected by bond. 
All the uninvested money which these commissioners 
hold should at once be restored to the treasury. Clearly 
it is the treasurer's duty to demand and enforce such 
repayment. 

(4) You cannot go further, in the performance of 
your duties as selectmen, than to call the treasurer's 
attention to the facts, as above set forth, and to refrain 
from certifying any vouchers for the payment of either 
the principal or interest of the $5,000 water works bonds 
bought by the "commissioners." 

Nothing I have said prevents these commissioners, 
as agents of the town, under the votes above quoted, 
from negotiating for the payment of the schoolhouse 
bonds before maturity; but the money for that purpose 
should be paid from the treasury only upon vouchers 



59 



duly approved, as in the case of any bill contracted by a 
committee or officer. 

There is no law which prevents a town from anticipat- 
ing and paying its own indebtedness. So far as the 
votes in question contemplate doing so, they are legal 
and proper; but so far as they contemplate a sinking fund, 
they are, in my judgment, absolutely illegal, and no 
" Sinking Fund" now exists because of them. 

Respectfully yours, 

(Signed) E. IRVING SMITH. 

In this connection it is proper to state that the 
Legislature has now prohibited the creation of any 
sinking funds hereafter. See Acts of 1913, Chapter, 719, 
Section 13. 

JOHN F. FARRAR, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
JOSEPH S. HART, 

Selectmen of Lincoln. 



60 



SCHOOLS 



Payments 

C. S. Lyman, Services as Superintendent, $540 00 

Walter F. Brackett, Teaching, 495 00 

Hattie B. Heath, Teaching, 572 50 

Abbie Bowlby, Teaching, 325 00 

Helen Bowker, Teaching, 515 00 

Katharine Works, Teaching, 515 00 

Priscilla Ames, Teaching, 470 00 

Helen Jones, Teaching, 425 00 

A. P. Smith, Teaching, 270 00 

Marion Crawford, Teaching 260 00 

John F. Farrar & Son, Driving School Barge, 568 00 

Thomas J. Dee, Driving School Barge, 555 60 

James B. Wheeler, Driving School Barge, 619 00 

M. H. Doherty, Transportation of Children, 404 50 

Town of Concord, Tuition of Pupils, 1,412 25 

City of Waltham, Tuition of Pupils, 845 00 
Boston & Maine R. R., Student School Tickets, 586 10 

National Express Co., Express, 2 93 

H. A. Wood, M. D., Professional Services, 200 00 

P. J. Lennon, Jr., Janitorship of South School, 139 00 

Francis Bennett, Janitorship of South School, 12 25 

Daniel McAskill, Repairs on Barge, 2 75 

Thomas J. McGann, Repairs on Barge, 7 50 

A. P. Smith, Cash Paid for Supplies, 18 33 

M. L. Snelling, 1 Cord, Sawed Wood, 8 00 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Wood and Kindling, 8 00 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Coal, 2 25 

Town of Lexington, Tuition of Ruth Farquar, 12 00 



$5 89 


7 


50 


45 40 


1 


25 


2 


00 


43 


00 


1 


10 


17 


50 


25 


50 


87 


70 



61 

M. H. Doherty, Transportation of Mr. Brackett, 

Roger Sherman, Moving Ashes, 

Helen P. Jones, Carfares, 

James T. Laird, Sharpening Lawn Mower, 

A. J. Dougherty, 1 Load Loam, 

James J. Hanley, Carriage Hire, 1907, 

W. C. Pierce, Foul, 

Redman Hartwell, Carrying Pupil to Concord, 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, 

William Bulger, Painting and Repairing Barge, 

Albany Carpet Cleaning Co., Labor on Barge 

Cushions, 16 00 

M. Steinmann, New Curtains alnd Repairs on 

Barge, 
William C. Robus, Labor and Supplies, 
James B. Wheeler, Cash Paid for Express, 
James B. Wheeler, Taking Barge to and from 

Concord, 
Isaac N. MacRae, Labor and Supplies, 
Current Events, 40 Current Events, 
Henry C. Stocher & Co., 5 Robes, 
John M. Macomber, Labor on Barge, 
Mrs. E. W. Blodgett, Cash Paid for Supplies, 
Mrs. E. W. Blodgett, School Census, 
Mrs. E. W. Blodgett, Auto Hire, 
C. S. Lyman, Cash Paid for Supplies, 
Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, New 

School, 

E. Howard Clock Co., Supplies, 
Edward Bannon, Janitorship of School, 
Milton Bradley Co., Supplies, 
Edward E. Babb & Co., Supplies, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Ginn & Co., Supplies, 
Hobbs & Warren, Supplies, 

F. B. Alexander, Supplies, 



15 


00 


5 


00 


1 


70 


4 


00 


302 


36 


8 


00 


18 


75 


4 


00 


1 


16 


13 


50 


6 


50 


6 


88 


94 


50 


8 


50 


500 


00 


1 


85 


182 


19 


46 


55 


29 


76 


1 


15 


6 81 



62 



Herman Goldberger, Supplies, 
Buttrick Lumber Co., Supplies, 
Chandler & Barber, Supplies, 
Atkinson Mentzer & Co., Supplies, 
South Lincoln Daily Co., Supplies, 
A. R. MacLeod, Supplies, 
Bradford, Brown Co., Supplies, 
Jordan Marsh & Co., Supplies, 
E. L. Tuttle, Supplies, 
Andrew Dutton Co., Supplies, 
Houghton Mifflin Co., Supplies, 
Louis, Stoughton & Drake, Supplies, 
Little, Brown & Co., Supplies, 
H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 
Charles A. Harris, Supplies, 



Total, 



$4 95 


32 44 


23 81 


14 23 


4 05 


3 47 


14 50 


2 57 


1 50 


1 55 


4 rs 


2 95 


7 44 


8 21 


3 05 


$114,30 81 



GYPSY MOTH WORK 



Payments 



John J. Kelliher, Services as Superintendent, $673 50 

John J. Kelliher, Labor of Horse, 99 00 

John J. Kelliher, Cash Paid for Supplies, 3 07 

Byron Lunt, Labor, 73 75 

Patrick J. Lennon, Labor, 413 75 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 486 25 

John Cannair, Labor, 445 00 

Henry A. Butcher, Labor, 355 00 

James Lahey, Labor, 165 00 

Jerry Moynihan, Labor, 116 00 



63 



James Ryan, Labor, 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Services of 

Telephone, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Labor of Men and 

Horses, 
Daniel E. Sherman, Labor of Men and Horses, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Labor of Men and Horses, 
Lincoln Press, Printing, 
Fitzhenry-Guptill Co., Supplies, 
H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Highway Department and Storing Sprayer to 

January, 1915, 
M. H. Doherty, Delivering Freight, 
.Boston & Maine, Freight, 
R. D. Donaldson, Teaming Load,- 

Total 



$72 00 


10 


77 


12 


29 


215 


00 


132 


00 


3 


00 


14 


60 


33 


94 




50 


25 


00 


6 


63 




77 


8 25 



$3,365 07 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Payments 

Edward Bannon, Janitorship of Public Build- 
ings and Grounds, $416 63 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, 46 56 
Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Returning Births, 2 50 
Edison Electric Light Light Co., Service of 

Light, Town Hall, 53 40 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 1 53 

National Express Co., Express, 2 10 
Willard F. Farrar & Co., Returning Death 

Certificates, 1 25 



64 



Thomas Groom & Co., Printing and Supplies, $16 33 
Lincoln Press, Printing,, 13 00 

George E Crosbjr Co., Printing, 368 95 

P. B. Murphy, Printing, 5 55 

A. W. Brownell, Printing, 1 50 

Waltham Publishing Co., Printing, 2 50 

James T. Laird, Services as Constable, 92 50 

Winslow A. Eaton, Special Police, 1913, 15 00 

Frank Cunningham, Special Police, 1913, 20 00 

John Kelliher, Special Police, 1913, 30 00 

Walter E. Sherman, Special Police, 1913, 20 00 

Leroy E. Bazley, Wiring Voting Booth, 10 80 

Charles S. Wheeler, Certification of Notes, 6 00 

Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Cattle, from 

April, 1913 to February 18, 1914, 53 51 

Herman T. Wheeler, Services at Elections 

and Primaries, 12 00 

Thomas L. Giles, Services at Elections and 

Primaries, 
Thomas J. Dee, Services at Elections, 
Herbert G. Farrar, Services at Elections and 

Primaries, 
James W. Lennon, Services at Elections and 

Primaries, 
James T. Laird, Services at Elections and 

Primaries, 
Clifford Wistrand, Services at Elections, 
John F. Farrar, Expenses in Locating Domi- 
ciles, 10 00 
A. J. Doherty, Legal Services, Bond Matter, 

in Chapin & als. vs. Town of Lincoln, 

Charles S. Wheeler, 264 50 

C. S. Wheeler, Insurance on Town Horses 

and Vehicles, 12 50 

C. S. Wheeler, Insurance, Policy 258512, 33 60 



12 


00 


5 


00 


7 


00 


7 00 


7 


00 


5 


00 



$589 40 


10 00 


29 00 


10 00 


$75 00 


6 30 


1 25 


6 00 



65 



M. L. Snelling, Coal, 

Winslow A. Eaton, Housing and Care of 

Hose Wagon, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Housing and Repairs 

on Hose Wagon, 
John F. Farrar, Housing Hose Wagon, 
Mass. Bonding & Insurance Co., Bond 20063 

for Treasurer, 
Tuttles Stable, Barge, Memorial Day, 
James T. Laird, Sharpening Mower, 
Allan Bros, 6 Police Badges, 
A. J. Doherty, Services % David Farquar 

and C. S. Wheeler, 150 00 

E. Irving Smith, Services and Opinion as to 

use of Town Money under vote, March 3, 

1914. 
Hanley & Goulding, Painting, South School, 
Leroy Bazley, Electrical Work, Hall and Fire 

Escape, 
C, S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, Mary J. 

Washburn, 
C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, John 

Tasker, 
John J. Kelliher, Court Fees, 
John F. Farrar, Labor on Station Road, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Men and 

Team, Station Road, 
I. N. McRae, Labor and Supplies, Town Hall, 
Lincoln Highway Dept., Building Road, at 

Centre School, 
William H. Sherman, Services as Assessor, 
Charles S. Wheeler, Services as Assessor and 

Expenses, 
William C. Pierce, Services as Assessor and 

Copying Book, 



30 


00 


65 


00 


12 


38 


12 


00 


14 


00 


38 


31 


21 


00 


186 


17 


97 


67 


50 00 


50 


00 


53 


50 


75 


00 



66 



Daniel McAskill, Repairs on Tools — Station 

Road, $3 10 
George L. Chapin, Services as Town Clerk 

and Registrar, 115 00 
Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Services as Selectman, 

Registrar and Overseer, 185 00 
R. D. Donaldson, Services as Selectman, 

Registrar and Overseer, 185 00 
John F. Farrar, Services as Selectman, 

Registrar and Overseer, 185 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, Poll Tax, 58 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Abatement of Taxes, Property, 203 75 

C. S. Wheeler, Services as Treasurer, 300 00 

C. S. Wheeler, Cash Paid for Supplies, 10 02 
C. S. Wheeler, Collecting Taxes, 1913, 

$48,823.71 @ 1£ %, 732 35 
M. H. Doherty, Services as Sealer of Weights 

and Measures, 20 00 
Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Preamubulating 

Town Line, \. 5 00 

Herbert G. Farrar, Preambulating Town Line, 5 00 

John J. Kelliher, Preamubulating Town Lines, 2 00 

Doherty Garage, Auto Hire, 57 00 

Ames Implement & Seed Co., Supplies, 26 60 

Francis Doone & Co., 1 Order Book, Selectmen, 9 50 
Roger Sherman, Rent of Land for Town 

Scales, July, 1913 to July 1916, 25 00 
James L. Chapin & Son, Grass, Seed and 

Phosphate, Common, 19 00 
James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies for Town 

Hall, 7 53 

Carter Ink Co., Supplies, 1 25 

M. H. Doherty, Supplies for Hose 1, 1 06 

Martin J. Rooney, Fighting Forest Fires, 7 20 

P. J. Lennon, Fighting Forest Fires, 29 20 



67 



John J. Hayes, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Timothy Ahearn, Fighting Forest Fires, 
C. S. Wheeler, Fighting Forest Fires, 
W. C. Robus, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Fritz Cunnert, Fighting Forest Fires, 
James Ryan, Fighting Forest Fires, 
John Cannair, Fighting Forest Fires, 

C. G. Frost, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Joseph E. Mahan, Fighting Forest Fires, 
William H. Ryan, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Herman T. Wheeler, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Joseph E. Whipple, Fighting Forest Fires, 
John D. Fleming, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Thomas J. Dee, Fighting Forest Fires, 
John E. McHugh, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Elmer Bean, Fighting Forest Fires, 
William J. Bennett, Fighting Forest Fires, 
George Bean, Fighting Forest Fires, 
George H. Sherman, Fighting Forest Fires, 
John J. Kenna, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Frank A. Dutton, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Hector MacLain, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Clifford Wistrand, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Walter Bennett, Fighting Forest Fires, 
John Coan, Jr., Fighting Forest Fires, 
Charles H. Rooney, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Martin Sherman, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Albin Erickson, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Ptobert Loring, Fighting Forest Fires, 

H. S. Cousins, Fighting Forest Fires, 
T. A. Calkins, Fighting Forest Fires, 

D. Monella, Fighting Forest Fires, 
F. Monella, Fighting Forest Fires, 
L. E. Brooks, Fighting Forest Fires, 
C. 0. Sargent, Fighting Forest Fires, 
I. B. Cook, Fighting Forest Fires, 



$5 


60 


10 


80 


8 


40 


12 


40 


24 80 


15 


00 


20 


80 


6 


00 


7 


20 


8 


80 


12 


20 


25 


20 


6 


80 


14 


50 


3 


00 


17 


20 


8 


60 


15 


60 


2 


80 




40 


38 


00 


2 


.00 


5 


20 


3 


40 


10 


80 


7 


20 


28 


80 


3 


20 


3 


50 


2 00 


2 


40 


8 


80 


4 


40 


4 


80 


12 


40 


2 


40 



68 



F. J. D. Bamforth, Fighting Forest Fires, 
J. W. Nelson, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Winslow Eaton, Fighting Forest Fires, 
T. W. Smith, Fighting Forest Fires, 
Isaac N. McRae, Fighting Fires and Auto 

mobile Service, 
F. E. Cousins & Co., Labor of Men Fighting 

Fires, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Men Fight- 
ing Fires, 
A. J. Dougherty, Labor of Men Fighting Fires 
James T. Laird, Service of Automobile at 

Fires, 
H. Mayer, Service of Automobile at Fires, 
James W. Lennon, Services as Auditor, 
Highway Department — Teaming Coal to 
Public Buildings, 



$1 60 


3 80 


8 40 


5 70 


42 80 


122 10 


34 80 


86 60 


> 

20 80 


5 00 


125 00 


67 50 



Total, $6,219.25 



HIGHWAYS 



Payments 

Wm. H. Sherman, Superintendent of Streets, $1,105.30 

William H. Ryan, Labor, 509 75 

John W. Rooney, Sr., Labor, 481 50 

Martin J. Rooney, Labor, 596 60 

Timothy Ahearn, Labor, 690 00 

Patrick Craven, Labor, 363 50 

Joseph Mahan, Labor, 477 25 

Fritz Cunnert, Labor, 4 50 

Charles H. Rooney, Labor, 36 00 

Charles P. Farnsworth, Care of Horses, 160 00 



69 



Daniel McAskill, Shoeing and Repairing, $29 40 

F. E. Cousins & Co., Grain, 680 76 

J. A. Burgess & Son, Shoeing and Repairing. 190 20 
National Express, Express, 2 91 

D. E. Sherman, Hay, 631 25 

Waltham Trap Rock Co., Crushed Stone, 860 63 

Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 6 60 

Boston & Maine R. R., Demurrage on Car, 7 00 

H. L. Alderman, Professional Services, 35 00 

Andrew J. Dougherty, Labor of Men and 

Horses, 53 25 

George E. Cunningham, Labor of Men and 

Horses, 15 75 

Frank H. Cunningham, Labor of Men and 

Horses, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Crushed Stone, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Labor at Stone-crusher, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Blasting Stone, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Labor on Snow Work, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Belt for Crusher, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Clipping Horse, 
Matthew H. Doherty, Carriage Hire, 
Herman T. Wheeler, Labor on Snow, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor on Snow, 
John McHugh, Labor on Snow, 
Thomas J. Dee, Labor on Snow, 
Elmer Bean, Labor on Snow, 
Daniel E. Sherman, Labor of Men and Horses, 
Daniel E. Sherman, Labor on Snow, 
M. L. Snelling, Labor with Team, 
William L. Bumpus, Labor of Team, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Team, 
Charles Skoglund, Inspecting Boiler, 
J. Loring & Co., Grain, 
John Macomber, Repairing and Jobbing, 



36 


75 


70 


55 


57 


25 


7 


25 


49 


50 


9 


00 


3 


00 




75 


4 


00 


7 


00 


16 88 


5 


63 


3 


38 


100 


50 


27 


50 


31 


50 


5 


25 


125 


25 


5 


00 


12 50 


59 


95 



70 



J. C. Keith, Horse, Brit, 

J. C. Keith, Horse, Grit, 

J. C. Keith, Horse, Ginger, 

J. C. Keith, Horse, Brownie, 

J. C. Keith, Horse, Bess, 

George E. Cunningham, Stone delivered to 

Crusher, 
L. E. Brooks, Stone delivered to Crusher, 
Michael Conners, Stone delivered to Crusher, 
John Wilson, Stone delivered to Crusher, 
Eugene Jose, Stone delivered to Crusher, 
John Fleming, Stone delivered to Crusher, 
Mrs. Mary A. Sherman, Gravel, 
T. A. Calkins, Gravel, 
Miss Alvira Brown, Gravel, 
Mrs. Morrissey, Gravel, 
Thomas J. Dee, Gravel, 
Flint Bros., Gravel, 
Herbert W. Farrar, Gravel, 
John W. Nelson, Pine Wood, 
William H. Sherman, three cords Pine Wood, 
Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Rent of Barn, 1914, 
Estella M. Brooks, Rent of Land for Stone 

Crusher, 1914, 
Flint Bros., 15 Posts @ .15, 
H. W. Wilson, 70 Posts @ .12 
Town of Concord, Use of Steam Roller, 
Town of Lexington, Use of Steam Roller, 
Barret Mfg. Co., Tarvia, 2,200 gals @ .09 
Barrett Mfg. Co., Tarvia, 7,200 @ .08 
Eastern Clay Goods Co., Supplies, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Benjamin W. Pipe, Supplies, 
H. S. Cousins & Co., Supplies, 
Eagle Oil & Supply Co., Supplies, 
Lexington Lumber Co., Supplies, 



$310 00 


335 


00 


350 


00 


335 


00 


335 


00 


23 


80 


28 


58 


18 


00 


45 


40 


44 


40 


5 


00 


47 


55 


18 


75 


24 


75 


13 


50 


9 


00 


54 


00 


5 


70 


1 


25 


15 00 


125 


00 


215 


00 


2 


25 


8 40 


97 


37 


4 


50 


198 00 


576 


00 


24 


32 




55 


62 


35 


62 21 


71 


75 


51 


31 



71 



Standard Oil Co., Road Oil, $1,045 41 

Peter Perry, Supplies, 83 50 

D. L. Hamilton, Building Fence, 11 00 

Nick Cotona, Labor on Stone Work, 32 75 

Charles R. Butcher, Labor on Stone Work, 10 00 

J. C. Keith, 6 Feed Bags, 4 50 

Lincoln Press, Printing, 85 

New England Metal Culvert Co., Supplies, 78 12 

Lincoln Water Works, Water at Crusher, 10 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Water at Town Barn, 12 00 
R. J. Drummond, M. D., Professional Services, 55 00 

Good Road Machine Co., Supplies, 140 97 



Total, $12,388 28 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Payments 

Martin M. Welch, Inspecting Meat, $153 50 

Martin M. Welch, Cleansing Watering Trough, 6 00 

Mass. State Board of Health, Branding Outfit, 2 65 

Total, $162 15 



72 
STREET LIGHTS 



Payments 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for January, $123 25 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for February, 113 39 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for March, 114 83 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for April, 114 59 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for May, 113 12 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for June, 111 56 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for July, 115 57 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for August, 115 97 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for September, 115 61 

Edison Electric Light Co., Service for October, 123 47 



Total, $1,161 36 



INTEREST 



Payments 

Bond & Goodwin, Note, $10,000, Due Dec. 

1914, Discount, $249 12 

First National Bank, Discount on Note, 

$10,000, 148 05 

Total, $397 17 



73 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Payments 

E. & F. King & Co., Supplies, 
James L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
National Express Co., Expressage, 
Thomas J. Dee, Care of Hose House, 
Thirty-six Firemen, Salary, 



TREE WARDEN 



Payments 

John J. Kelliher, Labor on Trees, 
P. J. Lennon, Labor on Trees, 
John Cannair, Labor on Trees, 
Henry A. Butcher, Labor on Trees, 
Fritz Cunnert, Labor on Trees, 
New England Tel. & Tel. Co., Service, 



$15 


02 




60 


1 


23 


15 


00 


72 00 



Total, $103 85 



$126 


00 


102 


50 


90 


00 


37 


50 


27 


50 


2 


41 



Total, $385 91 



74 
HYDRANTS AND OTHER WATER SERVICE 



Payments 

Lincoln Water Works, 122 Hydrants, $1,830 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Water Service, Town Hall, 50 00 

Lincoln Water Works, Watering Troughs, 472 49 



Total, $2,352 49 



WALTHAM HOSPITAL 



Payments 
Waltham Hospital, Appropriation, $250 00 



INTEREST COUPONS. SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 



Payments 

First National Bank, 37 Coupons at $20,00, 

July 1, 1914, $740 00 



BORROWED MONEY 



Payments 

First National Bank, 3 Notes, Anticipation 

of Taxes, ■ $20,000 00 



75 
SUPPORT OF POOR 



Payments 

Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Professional Services, 

(Mrs. Aqullo), . $5 00 



CEMETERY 



Payments 

Roger Sherman, Labor, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Labor, 
Lincoln Water Works, Water, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
New England Nurseries, Shade Trees, 



LIBRARY 



$302 68 


2 50 


20 00 


5 07 


14 00 



Total, $344 25 



Payments 

Treasurer of Lincoln Library, Dog Tax, $368 24 

Treasurer of Lincoln Library, Appropriation, 

1914, 500 00 

„ Total, $868 24 



76 



RECAPITULATION 



Payments. 




Schools, 




$11,430 81 


Water, 




11,257 48 


Moth, 




3,365 07 


Miscellaneous, 




6,219 25 


Highways, 




12,388 28 


Board of Health, 




162 15 


Street Lights, 




1,161 36 


Interest, 




397 17 


Fire Department, 




103 85 


Tree Warden, 




385 91 


Hydrants and Other Water 


Service, 


2,352 49 


Waltham Hospital, 




250 00 


Interest, Coupons, Schoolhouse Bonds, 


740 00 


Borrowed Money 




20,000 00 


Support of Poor, 




5 00 


Cemetery, 




344 25 


Lincoln Library, 




868 24 


Total, 


$71,431 31 



I I 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS AND MEAT 

To the Board of Health: — 

I herewith submit the following report of animals 
slaughtered during the year of 1914. 

Pigs 605 

Calves 115 

Cows 14 

Bulls 1 

Sheep 14 

Pigs condemned . 10 

Calves condemned 5 

MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Member of the Board of Health. 



78 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF FIRE ENGINEERS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

The Board of Fire Engineers herewith submit the 
seventh annual report, ending January 31, 1915. 

Force 

Thirty-six men belong to the department: one chief, 
six assistant engineers and 29 call men. There are three 
organized companies. 

Apparatus 

The apparatus belonging to the Department is as 
follows: — Four hose carriages, 25 fire extinguishers, four 
ladders, one harness, hose, axes and plaster hooks. 

Location of Apparatus 

No. 1. Hose house, old schoolhouse, Lincoln Centre. 
No. 2. Kept at F. E. Cousins' grain store, So. Lincoln. 
No. 3. Hose house, John Dee farm, Virginia Road, 

North Lincoln. 
No. 4. Kept at John Farrar's, South Lincoln. 

Fires 

Within the past year, we have had but one chimney 
fire and a loss of one slaughter house, making a total 
loss of about $1,400.00. 

We had a great many forest fires, due to the open 
season. 

ISAAC N. MACRAE, Chief, 
WILLIAM C. ROBUS, 
WILLIAM SHERMAN, 
THOMAS DEE, 
HERBERT FARRAR, 
HAROLD S. COUSINS, 
J. J. KELLIHER. 



79 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

I herewith submit the following report for the year 
ending December 31, 1914. 

I found most of the roads in better condition last 
spring than the two years previous, as last winter was 
not so bad for the roads, but some of the back roads 
where there was heavy teaming were badly rutted and 
cut up, and needed a lot of crushed stone to put them 
in good condition. I have used about 1,300 loads of 
gravel in different parts of the town, and 30 carloads 
of crushed stone from the Waltham Trap Rock Co., 
beside what stone we had at the crusher and about town. 

I have built about 600 feet of plank fence during the 
year and there are a number of places in town which 
will have to have new fences built the coming year. 

There has been paid out during the year for 

Hay, grain, straw, coal, etc., approximately, 

Stone and gravel, 

Tarvia and oil, 

Supplies, including horses, etc., 

Rent, 

Express, freight, doctor's bills, 

Superintendent's salary, snow work, labor, etc 

Repairs on carts, harnesses, shoeing horses 

Total, 

The sum-total of what has been paid into the 
Town Treasury and what is still due, for 
labor, materials, etc., is approximately, 550 00 



$1,320 00 


1,275 


00 


1,820 00 


2,350 


00 


150 


00 


100 


00 


i. 5,075 


00 


300 


00 


$12,390 


00 



Amount expended on highways, $11,840 00 



1,100 


Feet 


1,000 


a 


1,800 


a 


500 


u 


500 


a 


1,350 


u 


1,000 


a 


300 


a 



so 



The following is a list of places where the money has 
been expended in 

Building Gravel Roads: 

Tower Road, 

Taylor Road, 

Turnpike, 

Water Basin Road, 

MacRae Road, 

Browning Road, 

Hill near M. Connors', 

Road near Cyrus Chapin's, 

Corner near Dr. Loring's, 

Corner near Cemetery, 

Building Crushed Stone Roads: 

South Great Road, 1,500 Feet. 

Concord Road, 1,600 " 

Turnpike, 1,200 " 

Road near T. J. Dee's, 1,100 " 
Winter Street, 900 " 

and 700 feet of tarvia macadam, 15 feet wide on South 
Great Road, also teaming stone for filling up ruts and 
soft places all over town, scraping roads, cleaning out 
gutters, putting in culverts, drain-pipe, etc. 

We have on hand about 700 tons of crushed stone for 
spring use in different parts of the town. About 200 tons 
of this stone was purchased from the Waltham Trap 
Rock Co., to be paid for the coming year. 

The carts and tools are in about the same condition 
as last year. I had to buy one set of double harness 
this year. Now we have three good sets of double 
harness, one single cart harness and one single express 
harness. We have bought five new horses this year 



81 



and sold two, and one had to be killed. We now have 
three good double teams — all good young horses except 
one which is getting old and will have to be exchanged 
before long. 

Last spring there seemed to be a determination to 
lower the appropriation for the highways. It seems 
to me that if we are to keep our roads in as good or 
better shape, we shall have to expend nearly twelve 
thousands dollars each year. The South Road from 
the Weston line to Concord should have a tarvia surface 
all the way. It is almost impossible to keep the holes 
filled up on a gravel surface where there is so much 
automobile travel. If we appropriate the sum of 
twelve thousand dollars each year and after doing the 
necessary work, build a short piece of tarvia macadam 
road, we shall have some roads that will stand the traffic. 

There seem to be more calls for oil in parts of the 
town where we have not done any oiling. If we extend 
the oiling, it will require more oil each year which 
takes money. 

Yours respectfully, 

WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



82 



© 









(2 



'So 



t -Si 

IS-" 

8©flo9 

■g-g s ®-2 

5 * O"© C8 






DS 
W 

W 

w 

W 

EC 
O 






s 
I. 

«0 

I 

e 



80 




WK 



6 



83 



Report of tbe Commissioners of Sinking and 
Trust Funds. 



1914. 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS. 

In Account with 

TOWN OF LINCOLN. 

Dr. 



Feb. 


1. 


Coupons, Town of Lincoln 3£s 


$105.00 






Coupons, New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s 


50 00 






Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s . 


80 00 






Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4e ( Serial ) 


200.00 


Nov. 


1. 


$500 Town of Lincoln, Serial 4s, due 


500.00 


(i 


26. 


Cash, C. S. Wheeler, Treasurer 


2,173.37 






Coupons, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 . 


440 00 






Interest on deposit 

Cr: 


2.89 




$3,551 . 26 


1914. 




Feb. 


1. 


Balance 


$ 511.52 


Dec. 


29. 


$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, 1917 . 


2,022.50 


<< 


31. 


Balance 


1,017 24 




$3,551.26 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$2,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 

$1,000 New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 5s, due 1915. 

$4,500 Town of Lincoln 4s, Serial Bonds due 1912 to 1923. 

$11,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due Sept., 1936. 

$3,000 Town of Lincoln 3£s, due Sept., 1932. 

$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due June, 1917. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



M 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

FUND FOR EXTRA SCHOOLHOUSE BONDS 



1914. 




Dr. 




Feb. 


1. 


Balance 


$2,181.02 






Coupon, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 . 


120.00 






Coupon, Town of Lincoln 4s, 1917 . 


40.00 


Oct. 


19. 


$3,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, 1936 


3,038.84 






$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s. 1917 . 


2,040.89 


Dec. 


31. 


Interest on deposit .... 
Cr. 


. . 89.40 




$7,510.10 


1914. 




Nov. 


9. 


$7,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, . 


.$7,099.56 


Dec. 


31. 


Balance 


. 410.59 
$7,510.15 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1924. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1925. 
$2,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1926. 
$1,000 Town of Lincoln 4s, due 1927. 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



85 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE G. TARBELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 



1914. 
Feb. 



Dr. 



Balance 

Dividends, West End St. Ry. com. 
Dividends, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 
Dividends, West End St. Ry.pfd. . 
Dividends, Boston & Lowell R. R. Co. 
Coupons, $500 United Fruit 4§s, 1923 
Interest on deoosit .... 



$29 . 60 
3.50 
24.00 
26 00 
32.00 
11 25 
4.03 

$130.38 



1914. 
Dec. 



Cr. 
Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library 
Balance on deposit, principal account 



31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library . $100. 78 

29.60 

$130.38 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

8 shares Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 
13 shares West End Street Railway Co., preferred. 
8 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 
4 shares American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
1 share West End Street Railway Co., common. 
$500 United Fruit Co. 4As of 1923. 

Respectfully submitted, ' 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



80 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

GEORGE RUSSELL LEGACY TO THE 
LINCOLN LIBRARY. 



1914. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $33.02 

Dividends, Fit chburg Railroad Co. . 35 00 

Interest . . . . . . . . 1.83 



$69.85 
1914. Cr. 

Dec. 31 . Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library $36 . 83 

Balance on deposit, principal account . . . 33.02 



$69.85 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

7 shares Fitchburg Railroad Co., preferred. 

2 shares New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



87 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JULIA A. BEMIS FUND FOR BENEFIT 
OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



1914. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $7.25 

Dividends, West End Street Railway, common . 7 . 00 

Coupons, American Tel. & Tel Co. . 20 00 

Interest .40 



$34.65 



1914. Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer Lincoln Library . $27.40 

Balance on deposit, principal account . . 7.25 

$34.65 



The Fund is invested as follows: 
$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
2 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



88 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY TO THE LINCOLN 

LIBRARY 

1914. Dr. 

Dec. 31. Dividend, West End Street Railway Co. . . $3.50 

Coupon, General Gas & Electric Co. 6s . 60 . 00 

Interest 1.35 



$64.85 

1914. Cr. 

Dec. 31. Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer, Lincoln Library $64 . 85 

The Fund is invested as follows: 

1 share West End Street Railway Co., common. 
$1,000 General Gas & Electric Co. 6s, due 1916. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



89 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

/// Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR LINCOLN LIBRARY 



1914. 


Dr. 




Feb. 1. 


Balance , 


$19.40 




Dividends, West End St. Railway, common 


17.50 




Coupons, American Tel. & Tel. Co. 


20 00 




Coupons, Pennsylvania R. R. Conv. 3£s 


35.00 




Interest 


1.77 
$93.67 


1914. 


Cr. 




Dec. 31. 


Cash, J. F. Farrar, Treasurer, Lincoln Library . 


$74.27 




Balance on deposit, principal account . . 


19.40 




$93 67 



The Fund is invested as follows : 

$1,000 American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 4s, due 1929. 
$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co., Convertible 3^8, 1915. 
5 shares West End Street Railway Co., common. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



00 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR SILENT POOR. 



1914. 
Feb. 1. 


Balance 
Coupons, 
Coupons, 
Interest 

Cash, Sele 
Balance oi 
Balance oi 


American Tel, 
Pennsylvania 


Dr. 

, & Tel. Co. 4s 
Railroad Co. Conv. 3?s 


$288.82 

20.00 

35.00 

9.51 




Cr. 

ctmen's order 

l deposit, income account . 
i deposit, principal account 




1914. 
May 13. 
Dec. 31. 


$353.33 

$100.00 

208.33 

45.00 




$353.33 



The Fund is invested as follows: 

$1,000 Pennsylvania Railroad Co. Conv., 3£s, due 1915. 
$1,000 American Tel. & Tel. Co. 4s, due 1929. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



91 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

In Account with 

ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR TOWN HEARSE 

1914. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance $73 81 

Dividend, Pennsylvania R. R. . . 33.00 

Interest on deposit 3 51 

$110 32 
1914. Cr. 
Dec. 31. Balance on deposit $110 32 

The Fund is invested as follows*. 

11 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



92 



THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND TRUSTEES 

In Account with 

THE BEMIS LECTURE FUND. 



1914. Dr. 

Feb. 1. Balance . 

Dividends, Pennsylvania Railroad 

Boston & Providence R. R. 
Fitchburg R. R. pfd. . 
Old Colony R. R. . 
" Boston & Albany R. R. 

'! American Tel. & Tel. Co. 

Boston & Lowell R. R. 
West End St. Ry. pfd. 
Coupons, New York Railways, 4s 
Utah Co., 6s . . 
" Southern Railway, 4s 

New York Ry. Adj. (1914) 
Interest on deposit 



$1047.52 

150 00 

75.00 

37.50 

52.00 

65.00 

360.00 

120 00 

20.00 

20.00 

180.00 

120.00 

145.32 

19.62 

$2412.46 



Feb. 


3. 




4. 




17. 


March 


9. 




12. 


April 


21. 


May 


26. 


July 


3. 




4. 



Oct. 



14. 



26. 



Cr. 
The Pierces, Drama and Concert 
Alfred Holey Concert Co. . 
Prof. Leslie C. Wells .... 
Lyric Glee Club of Chicago 
Albert L. Squier, Lecture . 
William L. Phelps, Lecture 
M. H. Doherty, Teams to April 3 . 
P. A. Carter, Postals, Labor 
Boston Letter Carriers' Band 
Powell Printing Co., Programmes 
P. A. Carter, Envelopes, Labor . 
Fitchburg Railroad — twelve-trip ticket 
Powell Printing Co., Programmes 
Frank Lee Short Co., Players 
Dr. Frederick Monsen, Lecture . 



$50.00 

150.00 

41.29 

52.50 

50.00 

125.00 

24.00 

2.50 

137.00 

8.75 

2.75 

3.00 

8.75 

135.00 

70.00 



93 



Nov. 5. Mary Antin, Lecture .... 

19. Boston Opera Orchestral Club . 

Dec. 4. Will A. Dictrick, Lecture . 

16. W. F. Allan & Co., Postals and Printing 

17. Fuller Sisters, Concert 

30. Doherty Garage, Teams to date 

Dec. 31. Balance 



$100.00 

150.00 

50.00 

3.45 

150.00 

18.50 

1,079 .97 



$2,412.46 



The Fund of $30,000 is invested as follows: 

50 shares Pennsylvania Railroad Co. 

30 " Boston & Lowell Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Providence Railroad Co. 

10 " Boston & Albany Railroad Co. 

10 " Fitchburg Railroad Co. 

10 " Old Colony Railroad Co. 

10 " West End Street Railway, preferred. 

10 " New York, New Haven & Hartford R. R. Co. 

10 " Boston & Maine Railroad Co. 

60 " American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

50 " Northern Idaho & Montana Power Co., pfd. 
$3,000 Utah Co., 6s, of 1917. 
$4,000 New York Railways Co., 5s of 1942. 
$1,000 New York Railways Co., 4s of 1942. 
$3,000 Southern Railway Co., 4s of 1956. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. L. TODD, Treasurer. 



94 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING FEBRUARY, i, 191 5 

The Town has been free from any epidemic the past 
year. No contagious diseases have been reported. 

No complaints have been received during the year. 

Watering Troughs have been cleaned and school- 
houses fumigated as usual. Meat has been inspected 
by a member of the Board of Health. 

E. W. HERMAN, 
R. D. DONALDSON, 
MARTIN M. WELCH, 

Board of Health. 



95 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



The Board of Assessors submit the following report : — 


Number of residents assessed on property, 264 




non-residents assessed on property, 97 




assessed on polls only, 


190 




acres of land assessed, 


8,740 




dwelling houses assessed, 


269J 




horses assessed, 


332 




cows assessed, 


576 




neat cattle other than cows 


assessed, 113 




swine assessed, 


373 




sheep assessed, 


199 


Value of land, exclusive of buildings, 


$566,660 00 


" " buildings, exclusive of land, 


937,855 00 


" " real estate, 


$1,504,515 00 


" " personal estate, 


2,505,546 00 


Total valuation, 


$4,010,061 00 


State tax, 


$8,400 00 


County tax, 


4,606 57 


State highway tax, 


174 48 


Town grants, 


40,930 00 


Total, 


$54,111 05 


Number of polls, 


338 


Deduct part of corporation tax, 


$5,314 32 


Rate $12.00 per $1,000.00, 




Amc 


>unt to be collected, 


$48,120 73 



CHARLES S. WHEELER, 
WILLIAM C. PEIRCE, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Assessors, 



% 





H 


(MO^OOrtHOOOOOiMOOOOOOO 




8J_ «) 


hcOCOOC^^NOO^OCOOO^tHOO 






M»OCD^WHiCeONQNM»CCOOOO»OMN 




OC'COC^ 


1 


c< 


1 i-H <N 


t^WCOhNQOh 




U £ rt "S 


t- .h (N 






T— 1 


O 


t-H Tfl 




Total 
on 

Re! 


C^ 


1 








rH 






03 03 


OO O O ^H o o o o o o o o o o o o 








5CD OO^HCD(NOO^OOOO^HO. O 




00 iO tH CO rH QIMQMCDOCOOOOO (N 




2 1 


CD O C^ 


1 


r— 


J H (M 


COCOCOHNO t-h 




^ « 


t^ H 






1—1 




T-H 




-^ « c3 


OO o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o 




o3 O-S 


OO OiO(MtOOO*00000000 o 




£§« 


o^c» p^ 


1 i-H ^.ONNOOOiONiC o_ 




s«i 


"^acT c^ 


1 


T— 


tH O 


CO CO cr. 


IHT^N rH 




^ PS 


CD 






1 — 1 




r-i 


CG 


















Oh 


















W 
^ 


o 


<N 


<tf 




o c 


> 


<N O 


o o 


M o! 


T— 


CD 




00 iC 


) 


O CO 


^o 


«1 

Oh 


h° o i 


IT. 


) CD 




TH Tt 




t>- o 


LO 00 


3°« 

o o 


CO CD 
O <M 






+ 




■s 


« 














t— « 




<! 


Oh 


































©«**_ 


c 


O 




o ^ 


) 


to to 


o o 


£ 


j O d 

M « 


c£ 


) <N 




ot> 




00 t^ 


»o o 


® SS 2"S 


<N 


N 




^ w 


) 


iO <N^ 


th o 


W 


in 3 tn J3 




c^r 








CO 


rf 


Q 


CD 


<n 








CO 


CO 


►— 1 




T— ■ 










rH 




CX> 


















H 


















03 






















o 

m 
















aI 




a 






•+3 












"53 


















4> 

c5 






OQ 










: w 








r*^; 

e 






Wiifcd 




O 

s 


as 

C 

a; 


O «£ 

Scy.i 


;H- 

I 


1 


OS 1 * 


>rth, Alice M 
s, Herbert E 
s, Thomas 
Abbie 


< 
.5 


e 

1 


■s 


ett, Emma S 
ett, Stephen 
ett, Warren 
ett, Warren 








dam 
dam 
'Her 




<Z> CD C 


a S 


^ d S C 


> bJD bC bfi bl) b£) 
^ TJ "d ^5 T3 

o o o o o 




• 


H2 


<K 


o3 o3 s 


c3 o3 


03 <U O CL 








< 


< 


< 


< 


PC 


pq 


PC 


pq 


PQ 


PQPQ 


pq 


PQ 


pq 


s 


PQ 


PQ 


PQPO 



97 



©coooooooo^oocoocoGO^oor^to 

OJMMOOOOOOOOiOHQHQOOWOOCOH 



CN 00HC0M»O»OCOH(N00 

i—l CO CO 



CO T^HIO 

CO CO 



O GO 
O GO 



tH go 

GO 



o 


O O O 


o o o o o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CD O O 


CD O O O O O 


o 


o 


CD 


TP 


CO CD O 


H00CO(N^Tt< 


o 


(N 


CD 


GO 


CD GO 

T— 1 


tO rfi CD t^ <N tO 


CO 


^ 




o 


o o o 


o o o o o o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o o o 


o o o o o o 


o 


o 


to 


o 


CO to o 


CO o >o o o *o 


to 


to 


to 














1>T 


tO »0 

1— 1 


Th ^ to CD CN ^ 


<M 


CO 




O CD O 


OOOOOThOOcOOcOGO^OOt^iO 


O GO 


O) I> <M 


OGOOO(N>Ot-iOt-iC5CDO(MOOCOi— i 


O CN 


CO GO i-t 


G0O5CO^TfC0(M©tOC0 


t^ 


CO iOtjH 


^ cm 


CO 


H CO CO <N 


rft CO 




^H LO 


GO 




T— 1 


(N 




CO CD^ 
i—l 




to © © 


OOOOOtOtOOOtOiOOOOOT-tcD 


O O 


<N CO © 


OkOOO»005NOCO^i005^iOkOOO^ 


o © 


CO <N t-h 


lOCDOOCOCNi-HO^GO 


to 


(M <N (N GO 


O'-H 














CO 


HHCOM 


o cn 




CD t^ 


J>.~ 






CM 




<N CO 

1— 1 





-g^ o 

*3 - *H 

^ s« 

c3 rn 7/2 -+■» 

"« kT kT ° 

£> o3 c3 c3 

O tn 'f-i fn 

WPQWW 



H ' 



SsJs 
h^ a o o 

c3 



>s *3 
^55 






^s CO 

8H 



03 



.T CO 



CO CO 

o o 
o o 

qpqfflpq 



f-i Fh *h *h 



s^saa.s 

^ a a ^ co „ 

*-■ ^ 3 3 






I* 



CO CO S 
CO CO 2 

hfl b£ d 
M H G 

qpqpqpq 



co '3 

O £ 

O O 



a a 



ph 

a 

~ CO 
• CD 

Si 
1°. 

CO -+-J 



98 



H 08 » 

^ 1 

w 

o o K 



OOOOOOcO(NcDOOOOOOOOOOOOtJHOO 

COCOOOCOOO^HHOOOOOOOON^OOCOOOIN 

00HH05(N00(NH0iO00O^Tt<C0HN^OOi0»0 
HiOCOWO^OGOHCOH »OI>-tOTtiCO<NcN<M*0 

T— I H I> 



M ® 






o o o o o o o 

O CD <M O O O O 


O O 
<M O 


O 

o 


00>OhOOQCOO 
i— l rjH CO CO O Tfl rH 


00 O 
00 CO 


co 



ooooooooo 

OOOOCMOOOOO 

^NONOONOOOO 
»ONr^00OOHH^ 
CD 






o o o o o o o 
o o o o o o o 

IP 00 CD^^^O^iO^ 

1-T CO" Csf <M~ t> tJT rH 



o o 


o 


ooooooooo 


LQ O 


o 


ooooooooo 


CO iO 


to 


L0O"^rHOOO»OO 








!>. CM 




^OCOCQiOOHH^ 

*0 



M .£ 

03 <n 

_ a_ 

08 O 03 

H 2 



OOOOO CO CM O O O 000000^00 

CO t^ CO CO O TtH H O O 00 00 O <N O O CO O0 (M 

to O <N tH i-i O 00 ^ ^OO^OOONN 

H ^H 00 CO r-{ t-H i-l (M 



Ph I 



g 3 m tn 
M"3 ojW 



OiOOOO 


io o o 


o 


o 


*o r^ io t^ o 


O CO 00 


o 


o 


TfH l> o 


t^ t^ iC 


lO 


tH 



tH CO CO (M rH 



OOOOOOOOO 

OHiOTJiO(N>00 
^OOOCOONCOO 

o" 



a cu g 

,fl.fl.S 

O O M 

-+■=> ■+=> £fl 

pqpqo 



o 

CO fl 

b o 

o fl fl cj 
. cu cu h 53 

E=f <J O O O W 4 § 

J§ fl' fl" d & & fl"-J 
&'S/ 8/8/3/ S/S.s 

flc3o3o3o3c3o3?H 

oooooooo 



fl cq 

^H CD 



CD cQ 

'C B 

c3 >5 CD 



O 

o3 o3 03 g 
OOOO 



^ -fl 

to o3 ^3 

9 % 2 

grg 03 



03^5^3 
O O O 

oooooo 



o3 
fl 
fl 

Ph 03 
o3 

fl O 

o o 



99 



o o 



NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

COOcOOHOONOONTt<OOCOOO^OiOrt<CD^^O 

rH00O00N(N»O^00C0C0rHNTlH(MCOcO00W00i0O500G0G0 
NHH^OHN^HOOW^COWNWCO r- It— ( CO N H 

i— ( OS i— 1 



o o o o o 

CD O tH O CO 


o o 
o o 


H 00 00 00 CO 
<M ,-( tH O 


00 CD 
^ CO 



oooooooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOO^HOOcOcO^HcOO 



ONWC0^^00O00M(NC00i00OG0 
CO(NCCCO(NIOCDCO r-Ht^ CO CO t-i 



ooooo oo oooooooooooooooo 

OOOOO OO OiOtOiOOOOOOOOO^OtQO 
00>ONO00 OO O^^NOOO>ONOOCOGOMOiO 



t-H H 


^ b- ^H CO 


CO<M<M<M(MtHO(N 


T-H CO 


CO »0 t— 1 








CO 






<N 


ooooo 


00 O 00 


o o o 


o o 


00 


(N 


•OOCONO 


t^ TfH O 


CO CO o 


iQ 00 


00 


(N 


co (N i>- io oo 


CO 00 ^H 


00 t-H CO 


CO t-H 


t>- 




HHC^ H 




t-H l> 


^ 


T— 1 


iO 


*o o o *o o 


*o o o 


to o io 


iO o 


o 


00 


<M O O t^ O 


CO O Th 


(N O l> 


1^ to 


o 


T— 1 


HOCO^lO 


iO l> CO 


iO CO *o 


00 t-H 


^H 
















HH(M t-H 




rH O 

CO 


CO 


T-H 



W 



^ eg 

f- !h O M 

08 o3 of S 
bO bJO g .3 

'E'E O % 
O O O 



o 
O 



o 
O 

°8 



Woi tc 



WW 



WW 

CD CD 
WW 



CD "T3 

rH O 

O H 

CD o3 



o 



02 CO 

a a 



02 <Z2 

j66 



.s.s 

S3 S3 

o o 
OO 



2 

03 «2 

HH S3 
cqo 

2 ° 

O m 

OO 



9 © 

'o bl) 

-^ s3 % 
oil 

£ s~ a | 

4»* bO ■ bD - 

^ d d ?h 
■ cd .S3 .S3 o> 
S3 S3 d d 
d d d S3 
?Si 3^ 

OOOQ 



0-3- 



go W 
o ^^ 

rH _~ 03 

*53 CD p^h 
rd^O 

« .2 of 

CD lIj .rH 

d§^ 

bJD^ d 

S^h O 

a^ 

CD CD 



r>S 

O 



CD 



m 
o3 








O 


(/j 


-d 




a 

cd 

r-3 


o3TJ 


a 


d 




w 

CD 


a 


QQ 



„ «rO O 

W o^ 

■s- -J 

W o ~ 
-23 ^ 

-""CJ -(-3 

CD r-H rH 

bJO o3 CD 
^ S3.C3 
OOO 



100 



M 

c 

s§ 



- 
d 



OOOGOO^OOOOCDOOOOOO(MO 

WOOOOOiO(NO(NNCOOOC^OOOOO 



O to 
O <M 



Ol^NOOO^OiOOOCOiOOWMHOWOOW^OOH 
H(MCOH^iO(M(NCO^Tt(M^ <M CO t* r* CO <M t- ih 

(M i-H t-H t-H (N (M t-H 








0000000000000000000 




aj 0-3 





OOOO^OONNINGOOOOO^OOO 




GO 


^iooococoo^w 


HWM 


r-HOO(NOO<l^GO 




— c: 

O 8J 


i-H 


CN t-H 


^ Tfi (M 


M(Nrt*CCO^ 


GO CO tF iO CO <M 


1—1 




H « 






(M 


1— 1 y-^ 


" 


T-H 


1-^ 






© 0) 





0000000000000000000 




« ©* 





00000010000010000000 







Aggreg 

Value 

Real Esi 


10 


OCOOtOOOtOOOOtO 


r* O^O iC(N O^O^ 


10 




1—1 


c<Tt-T 


^ O t-H 


O O CO (M GO CO 


*o~ csT co~ rt^ t-T c<f 


r-T 








(N 


r-4 t-H 












a 

S3 


O O O GO 


"* 


O 





O CD 


<n 




to 


s 1 


(M O GO CO 


tO GO 


O 


i-H TH 


(M Th 


O <N 




OQ 


_ C — 


T—i 


-HH CO rH 


O ^ 


CO 


Tt< 1> 


1-* T-H 


t^ t-H 




r-l 


83 O 83 
O § 




<N t-H 






T—\ T-H 


T* 




1—i 




t-H 


O 

— to 

S3 














c<* 






»«M 


^o 


»o O 





O O 


to 


»o 




t^ 


<S °"e4 © 


O O lO t-H 


O iO 





GO iO 


to 


CO to 




CO 


0§g"c1 




O t-H i-H 


1>- H 


CO 


T-^Tj^ 


t-H ^H 


T-H T—I 







J- - T += 
























(N T-H 






T-H 1 1 


CO 


CO 






<;>Pu w 














GO 

t-H 







I 









I 

■§J|fi> 

O O O O o3 

PQCPW 



WWW 



tfO 



f-4 


+3 


c3 




T3 


03 


WW 


*H 


b 


3d 


d 


fH 


rH 


Fh 


U 


ed 


a 


r^fe 



tS Q ^ 

^ 3 a 

■th-'SPl, 

T- O^-g 



o 
H 



id 



O 

1.1 



- rn a} 



^3 « 
I- 






•+3 -H-3 



^^T e S 



Ph 

pH fe Ph Ph Ph fe r^H 



101 

0000000000^0000000000*00000 
O00(NW^OO^(N>O(NNOO^HO^O0iC0»ONG0G0 

00NHHO^»OO0300QOOO(N^O(NONCDiC00HO 
O 1>- »0 (NOH(M^G^NOicO O CO (N CO <N O ^l 

HOiH C3 t— Ir-Hr— irH O 

H CO~ 



o 
© 



o 

00 



OOOOOOOOOO 



OOOiOOOllMOCOO 



o o o 
^ o o 


O 

CO 


O CO o o 
O ^ 00 ^H 


t^ cN 


OS 


(M CO CO 



o oooooooooo 
o oooooooooo 
o^ h t^o^co^t^rH^o^co^oq^^ 



o o o 


O 


O LO O O 


o o o 


o 


OiCOO 


(MOO 


GO 


O "CfH t-H CN 



CO C^ 



<N iO 



CO 



O 00 o 


o 


^ o o 


O 


o o o 


O iO o o 


o 


O 00 <M 


o 


LO O rH 


o 


t-H O ^ 


O CO »o CO 


TjH 


00 t^ t-H 


o 


OON 


O 


(NOC^ 


NCOHCO 


<N 


HNiO 


iO . 


CO t-h 


CO 


CO 


<M CO 




O t-H 


1— 1 




T—l 




o 




1—1 










CO 




O O T-H 


o 


o o *o 


CO 


»0 o o 


NOJiOiO 


O 


o o ^ 


o 


^OM 


CO 


t^ o o 


CO (M <M r^ 


o 


IC^OS 


o 


lO lO "Tt 


CO 


CO *0 <N 


CO O t-h (N 


<M 
















HHIQ 


CO 


CM t-H 


CO 


CN 


<M CO 




00 o 




1 


rH 




io 

05 





CO 

o cd 

CD CD 

CQ CO 

d 3 

rH »H 



o 

" CD r-3 

eg bC 

a 8 P 
<i <tj < a j* o a 

H.N O 
CO S-3 

- CD ITh 

CO > cj 

r§ g I 

OOOOOOW 



CD CD p^ 

'3 '3 '3 
ads 



"c3 'a> P aS of 

c3 o3 03 7, 



CD 

w 

CD 

E 

o 






.S £ CO CD 03 

t iUu 

^d 'C +5"5 3 

H -H Sh >>> C 
03 03 03 03 CD 



CD CD ^ 

bX) W).S 

fc! fa h 

O O 03 

CD CD ^ 



co* co" a 

CU CD 03 

bJD bJD d 

O O O 



Ph 



CD d 

d 

cD " 



H ^ ^ 

~ CD CD 

•+J -+3 -+3 

d d d 

d d d 



CO 

w 

. CO 

CO T* 

CO CD r * 

CDrg Ph. 

3 03 C3 

03^^d.r- 



CD 



""cd d ^ 



C3 



co co 

CD CD 



CD 



3 >» >> d 

W 03 03 CD 



. o w 

^^> : d 

d d<! 
o o „ 

co CO oq 

d d cd 
rdrd d 
o o o 



102 

! OOQOOOOOObONOOXOOOOOOOOOO^O^ 



N 

° i 
■S £t3m 

6 



CO»00005NCOCONH(MO 



iC H h C^ H M iOH^G0rt< 



H O 


OOOOOOOOOOOcNOOOOOO 


o o o o o 


H 5 


©O^^OOOOOcOOONh^^lNNOW 


O (M ^ O O 




CO^OONOCOO^rHC^O 


O^OJiOINiO 


OOOi^lMCD 




CO <M 


CCMH 


C^(M(MH 


lOHH(MH(M 


tF 


htHNCO 


S 


oooooooooooooooooo 


o o o o o 


1°^ 


0000000000*00000000 


o o o o o 


g 1 ^ 


WON 


r-^O^TH 10000 05GO 


(M^ <M^ O^ rH^ O^ h 


O CON O O 




eoTc<f 


MOH 


WHH 


r*T r-T H of th" of 


T^ 


rH CO CO CO 






rH 










o 

08 


o o 


o o 


o 


00 00 00 o 


o o o 


O r^ O tH 


M £ 

e3 to 


0> *o 


Tt< <M 


CO 


CO ^H l> (M 


CO TtH O 


O t* O CN 


H H 














fl_ 


O rH 


<M !> 


co 


rH H^ 


CO <N Q5 


CO CO Ol 


■3O03 

+9 (3 












rH H 


o o 














H 2 

09 

Ah 
















LO iC 


o o 


CD 


lOOiOO 


o o o 


iO o o o 


S S3 


CM <M 


o o 


o 


HHCDIC 


o o io 


NNON 


£§§5 


00 rH 


CN O 


CO 


rH CO 


CO(NN 


CO rH^O^ 

r-Tr-T 


Oh 















CO _H 

go 



03 

Pi 



CD ct 

02.O.C! Sg 
tS3 03 



cd ^a 
fl o 

fl r3 S S -C W) 03 'g 

co (D a) cd .zi .Z3 ^3 J3 

O $ $ $ k3 # ^ ^ 



CO ^ 

CO " cd 
CD ,-< »»h 
H « H 

<=3 O 03 

r^r-jPL, 



fl Pi Pi 
O O O 

a a pi 
a pi pj 

CD CD CD 
H^r-3 



H-3 



r-5 

•rl *h co 

H CD CD 

p*'£ FJ 

CD O 2 



«1 

. 03 



■9 

pj 

w s 

CD . 
.PI PI 

tJOtn 
C3 C3 



CD jh 
*S C3 

CD "^ 
Wr-T 

CD CO 

r>»<1 

03 O 



Tfl 

'CD 

•S « FJ r« 
FJ ^*43 C| 



CO 




H^ 


H 




PQ 


O 


pd 


E« 


bU 


0) 


P 


el 


WPh 

CD O 



103 



OOCOOOOOOOOOOON 



<N 



ooooooooooooo 



© ^ 1-1 


t^ 


T— | 


CM tH 


GO -HH GO CM © 


© 


CO (M © tHH (M tHH 


© Tt< CO 


t^ 


T-H 1—1 




i-H 


CO t-H 


CO t-H 


i-H 


t^ 


Tf 


© CM GO t^ CM CM 


CO © 




CM 


iO 












CO 


^1 




CO 










o o 




o 


© o © © © 


© 




© 


© © © © 




© 




© 


rji O 




to 


© CO O © © 


© 




© 


^ o o o 




X 




© 


^ o 




i-H 


CM 


© tH go 


o 




CO 


OMOO^ 




TjH 




<tf 


i-H <M 




rH 


i— ( 


CO i— 1 


i-H 


© 




© 


CM O t-h CM 




© 




CM 


^ 




r-H 




T— 1 




CO 






^ 










O O 




o 


© © © © © 


© 




© 


© © O © 




© 




© 


O O 




© 


OiOOOO 


© 




© 


© © © © 




© 




© 


c^o 




CO 


©^ 


lOiOiO 


©^ 




©^ 


NiOLOO 




TfH 




© 






























T-TlO~ 




© 


i-H 


<M © 


T-H 


iO 




GO~ 


^H CO i-H C^ 




IC 




CM 


CO 












CM 






CO 










GO CO O O 




o © 


o 


© © CM 


T-H 




© © © O 


© © 




©GO © 


CM GO <N CQ 




TP TF 


*— 1 


co r^ th 


CM 




C^ONC^ 


CO © 




CNCO 


lO T* t-H 


l> 




<M <N 


GO 




CM CO 


© 




CM © CM tH 


© 




CO 


CO 


^ 






CO 






t^ 


Tt< 




CM CO b- 


© 








i—i 














^1 

i-T 




CM 










O © O O 




©© 


*o 


© © GO 


o 




© © iO © 


© © 




© LO © 


^h © © © 




o © 


t^ 


lO CO CO 


CO 




IO © (N .fcO 


IC © 




©co © 


^ © i-H 


CO 




t- <M 


CO 




CM CO 


t^ 




GO © t^ CO 


© 




CO 


CO 






























ON 






CM 






CO 


© 




HiCM 


LQ 








T— 1 














cm 

T-H 




CM 











c8 C rj H >H 2 rv^ 

„ w S ^ ^ § - 
S^FshMHoq g 
.So ~ ~ ~ . g 

tn O O CD © 03 ^ 

QQ bC bfi bfl bfi bfi o3 
~ co o3 o3 o3 cd CO 
O O fin fL< Ph Ph Ph 



§ a a 

.25.5 



CD CD CD 
O O © 

b *"* in 

"<3 *o '53 

Ph Ph Ph 



. o « 

CO 03 

-S.S 

PhPh 



^^^aUH 



d 

03 ^CD 
co |jo 



CD CD 
O O 

u u 

CD CD 

S"ffi 



rH 

£ W Hi 

, CO ^ „ 
•fl CD CD 

O Sh rH 

o.S.S 

h^PhPh 



o3 <3 g 

CD ^ *H 
O <d o3 

.2 O O 
Ph Ph Ph 



o 

CD 



ErO^ 



o3 

pqW 
I* 

£ o 

CD r^H 

o o 



PQ 



- m 


^^i 


H CD 

o3 >H 


cd ?- 
bJD o3 


•S c3T3 ^ 


^^ 


"Stj 


^o 


PQH 


^ CP 


0T CD 


>%P3 r o r ^ 


^^ 


O O 


PhP^PhP^ 



»H 
Pi <^ 

co <D 

^ 9 
O O 

o o 

Ph-Ph 1 



104 



8£/gw 

So £ 
o 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO^OOOC<I 
^OOOCOOO^^CCOOOOOOO^MNOO^OOrHN 

OOCOO>0500iO(MH05NO^H(NiONOOCO^(X) 
^CDOOCOr-liHCO'^^COCCCO^CO (M H CD iO rt* H iO 



es 0_ 
O 



O 

o 
to 



o o o o o o 
o o cn o o o 

OONhhiOCO 



oooooooooooco 

OOOO^WCOO^OOOOO 

CDCcDO^iOiO^OlNWOi 
CCCOOCO (NHiOiO^HOO 



Ma," 

2 SW 


o 

o 
o 


M"3 — 


<N 



o o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

O to CD to to tQ 



t— i to O i— I i— I Tfl 03 



oooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOtOO 

otootocQrHcotooqtoT-HT^ 



CO (M GO (N 



(NH^^COHN 



o o 

^h o 
t^ go 

05 CO 



o o o o o o o o oo 

GO CO O ^h ^H CO CO CO O GO 



t— i t— i GO i— I OS *— I 00 

CO rH ^H CO ^ 



O ^ 

i-h do 



(N to 



O O TjH 

GO CO GO 

rM CO 

CO 



?s§3 



OO O O to O O <N CO o 

tOO lOiONiOOOOCCiO 
^ O i—i ONNOH 



^h OS 
-^ CO 



tO 



to o 

l> tO 

CO i-H 



tO o 

i-H CO 



o to o 

OWN 

T* O 

CO 



CD 
S r °5 



>>>> >* g 

M ?H h » 

c3 c3 c3 rv 1 

§§£* 

CC 02 02 
CD CD CD to 

PhPh&02 

O O O 3 



** rz3 fcj o3 ** 



:S 



<3 tfO^ - ~<3 
+3 tT CD CD 



^H CD 
& 9 



^c3 a a « is s ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ? s S ^ -§ 



CD i-fl 

CI ~ 

2^ 



fe a a 



bJD 



QQ 



^3 • oq 






c3 O O O CD 



a s a 
cs <^ <^ 

s a s 

?_ ^ J-i 

CD CD CD 
,£j ^CJ ^ 



a a s 

C3 li d 

s s a 

M ^H ^ 

CD CD CD 



a 



105 



OOOOONOOOOiOGOHO 
0005H050iOOCOiO»C(M 

OOOOOiO'O'OOOO^LOQDH 

WOl o hoo^ooohoc 

rH r-H O 1— I "tf 

co* r-T 



OfMOOOOOOOOOOC 
tOCOOOOOOO^OOC^OO 

OOt^CO^CNOlcOC^CiQOt^CO 
T^OO r-H iC CO CO CO i— I <M 

(M O^ iO CO CO 

of 



o o o 


o o o 


o o o o o 




o o o 


O O CO 


O O O O <N 




O 00 "tf 


tH GO iO 


O OOOON 




CO a: o 


' id t^ CO 


tP CO CO rH 




r-H OQ 


r-H 


(M CO 




o o o 


o o o 


o o o o o 




o o o 


o o o 


o o o to o 




*o^ o^ 


tq^O^ 00^ 


O^ lO^iq^cO^cO 




c^Tco" i>r 


tjTtjT CO 


cT noh 






l—{ 


•OQ CO 




O00NO00 ^O 00 r-H O 


COOIOOOOOOO 


00 


CT> H 


3i CO iO CO iO *0 CO 


iCOOOOOOO^C 


00 


CO T-H 


lQ lO CO H^ lOCD iO 


oot^co^oioqcocsico 


CO 


o 


H(N O0CHH 


^ O CO HHCC 


Ol 


Ci 


CO^r-H CO 


MO^ CO CO 




of 


r-T 


of 




lO^NOiO OOCOO 


COr^OOOOOOO 


o 


(Ncocjoh o co r^ o 


rHO*OOOOOOiO 


^H 


COt^^COOJ o^cccc 


NWM^OOONM 


Ol 










i—i 


HM CO LO rH CO 


ONLO r-H CO CO 


OQ 


rH 


00 r-H 03 


(NO CN to 




oq 




i—i 





■:£& 


§32 


&£* 


OfnH 


AAA 


-*» -^ -^ 




s a a 


GOCCGQ 



6od 

►. CD CD 
b£ bX) bl) bJDr-5 O O . „ 

1§]§]§1> g § § o o 

W M M W O -+3 -+J -+J -4^ 

Tfiuimmuiuimmm 



-e : 

2° 

rH ^ 
OrP 

O o 



Cu 
CD 

DQ 

H 

'O r^H 
cS ~£ 

s 2 

° § 






hH 



bC bX)-5 
M 5^ b tn 
S ° ° C§ 
J^ CD CD J2 



. -I— I I I CX| 



>> >» r>> ~ 

CD CD CD -t- 3 

FH rH r- ^J 

o o o 2 

-P -P -P r* 

mmmm 



3$ 

03 O 



CD 
03 W 



-r-| Id 'o "o 

^rQrQrQ 
P rH rH rH 

03 03 03 o3 



fir** 

r-T rH f4 
CD CD rH 



106 



MO $ 

ifa* 

o w 
H 



O00OOO(MO^OOC0OOO00OOO(MOO 
NOO(NOOCDOi(MOiOOOONOOO^^OikO(N 

CO CO CO rJH 00 O CO OiOCOC^iOCDOiOMcDM^fN 
©HHMN05 05 t^O^COCO^COC^CMaO <N 

^ i—l CO i—i 



M 

e3 


cS 


o o o o o o o 


o o 


oooooooo 


o 


H 


(O 


O <M <M O O O O 


o «n 


OOOO^OOOO 


o 


"3 


gw 


Th CO CO «tf 00 O CD 


CO (M 


0^0*0^000000 


05 


o 


"3 


1— 1 rH T— 1 


C<1 b- CO O 


iO 


t* CO iO ^ CO CO r- 1 J> 




H 


« 






T-i 










o o o o o o o 


o o 


oooooooo 


o 


a 


-»j 


o o o o o o o 


o o 


OOiOOOOOO 


*o 


o 


§H 


lOHH 


o iO iO o 


iO I>- 


lOiOcONiOOiOiO 


t^ 




















3-3 


OHH 


<N CO <N 00 


<N 


CO <M tH CO <M IO 










i— l 










03 


O 00 


(M O ^h 


O CO 


O O 00 


o o oq o o 


M 

05 


00 


t^ ^H 


CO Oi (M 


rH 00 


!>. C^ CO 


TjH tH OS IO <M 


H 




t^ 


O 


CO CO 


iCO^ 


<M 00 "^ rt< CO 


"3 


O 85 


t^ 


CO 


(N O 


r— 1 


CO 


rH 


O 


s 

i-l 

Ph 


CO 




CO 








»o 


*.2 


to to 


(M iO O 


to Oi 


to o o 


o o o ioo 




§"S 


t- ^H 


iO l> <M 


CN tH 


NIOC5 


O O rH 


l>- o 


P 03 


^ 


O^ 


a^oo 


t^ 00 CO 


(M t— tJH CO rH 




5h 


T— 1 


*o 


t-Tio 




iO 


1-H 


<J 




CO 




(M 









fc S A 

o o o 

M' 02 CO 



c3 a> o 



c3 
° _o 

03 r3 



02 CD CD 
CD O O 

TU T^ T3 

o3 o3 o3 

ooo 



* o 

O Pi 



bfl CD ^ r^H 

w o g g-g 

r ^^ § s § 



c3 c3 c2 



14 t* I* 

CD CD <D 



t~4 f-i ?H ?H r/ T 

p2 pSS pS ^h S 

CD CD CD CD M 

A -d ^5 ^ ra 



Op_7 

"13 



t:o 



o 

^H CD 





g o S.SP 

7^4 O pH *>H 


^^^^ 



107 



CO CO CO CO (M o 






M 
M 




(NOOJ^^W 




CO CO CO CO (M CO 


oo 


ICHNCDCO"^ 


<M 


U 




<D 




& 




e 




<D 






O 




P 


00 00 CO to o io 


OOHOiNOO 


*tf 


t}H i— l CO i— l <M CO 


<D 


of 


tf> 




Cfl 




0> 




CO 








pqq a~ 



J=H I=H "O 

O, Oh - 

a 3 S 



. oT qT £ 
^ *-« 2 

# CU ^CD O 



108 






! coooo^oooo^ooooooooooooo 

I OOOOOOOOOOOWO^OOOOOOOOCOHOO'* 






MC^IHHCD^^COINHO 
H CO LO 00 



03 

H 




00 o o o 
00 o o o 


OOOO^OOOOOOOOOOOO 
O0000(MO^H0000OO00c0r-i00O 


"5 
o 
H 


"oi 
(V 


<M CD 00 CO 




CO <N i-H 


^h CO ^ rH CO (M 

CO JO 


H O 

00 

T— 1 



CO 

a 

H 

W 
Q 

CO 
I 

O 



1*3 

S?§w 



o o o o 
^ © o o 

<N iO O »0 



OOOOOOOOOOOOiOOO 

O^iONiO^iOiOOOOOMOO 

OINCO (NOrHT-HO»O^COrHT-HO 



CO 



CO rfl 



to 



a> 


*o 


00 


M o5 
03 "g 


o 


TtH 


H cW 


<N 




*°15 






o 9 






t-i o 






1-4 






« 






Ph 







"t» O 03 

|3II 



O 



o 

o 



03 03 



d^ 



OQ 






CD 
CD 

■+3 

GQ 

H 

-* 03 _r 

• CD ~;d 
a d £ 

CD CD O 

PhPhPh 



a d 
o c 

6 r 

CD CQ 

03 

£< 
§| 

-t-3 O 

go o 
O !Lh 

PQPQ 



. . d 
. . o 

d • d 

>h CD 

^ d d .s 

Pi CD t£T 
OH S«h* 

°- g'S E 

b- CD 03 l-H 

^ hD g g 
O d i> £ 
o O o o 

?H U fH fH 

PQWPQM 



£ a 



>*h 03 

"Sill 

d 1 ^ ro 

s,s.3§ 

oooo 



CD 



o 

+3 

rfi 

o 

~ CQ 
1-5 ^CD 

GO Th 
CD 03 

§o 

fi 

GO 



d 
o 

-♦-3 

go 
O 

Ph 



O > CD 
TD 

m U2 cd 

CD ~ ,rH 

d s ^ 
S .d d 

03 O 03 

OOP 



109 



OOOOOOOOCM 

(NOOOOCOWNHOGO 



O CO o oo oooooocmooo 

CDIOCOCO(N^(N0^0005000N 



00 



CO 
tO 



H»OH(N(MnH(NHCOO^ 
CO HCOMH CM i— i 

rH 00 



o o o 


o o o o 




O CO O O O 


OOOOOCMOOO 


O «tf Th 


CO CM CM GO 




^iCOCOlN 


(MO-^OOOOOOO 


(NGO00 


WNHO 




T* rH TJH rH 


H(N(N^(NHCCNN 


t^ 


7— I 




t^ CO 


rH CO CM i— 1 CO rH 

CO 


o o o 


tO o o o 




o o o o o 


ooooooooo 


o o o 


t^ o o o 




ocoo»oo 


oooooco*oioo 


ONN 


(MCOH05 




CM rH O rH 


HONOOH(M©0 












CO 






CO N 


HININH tO rH 

»o 


o 




CM 


o o o 


o o 


o 




GO 


CM CO Ttf 


ON 


CO 




GO 


tH CO iO 


CO CM 






Oi 


CO 


»o 






rtn 


r— 1 


r-i 


o 




00 


o o CO 


o to 


o 




CO 


to O 00 


to CM 


iO 




UD 


CO CO N 


!>. CM 






t— r 


co~ 


cm" 






Tt< 


l— 1 


r-i 






-4^> GO 



T3 

3 

o 

G 

O 

Q 



SO oj^O 

^ o 02 S 
QPPSH 



o§ 



JJ2 



d 

o 

bfi 
3 



T3 

O 

o 

o 
O 



H 



03 

!H 


o 
d 


cu 


o 


rCJU 


fe- 


of 
iH 


r- 


O 


tf 


Q 


d 


rt 


o 




F3TJ 


^ 


!H 


Sj 


cu 


Jh 


a 




Wfe 



d £ 

o.r 



o 

O 

CO 

«! 

bD 03 
J* 



^ J 

o3 . m 
O . % 

.S.S o£ 
EG£3 



GO 

. O 
.« 

o^ r 

H co 

.Sg 8.S 

rf 2 C5 J 

•T3 a <D <D 

5^ 2 P P 
O O ^ *H 



s 

o^ 



d 
. o 

• <L> 

sj 

^ <4-T'© 



egos 



^ of 
11 



c3 O 

£>. co 

l> £ 

~ <X> 

*■* 

^M 
*H 

o ~ 

■+-> ■— ! 

b£^ 

.a * 

W >H 

c3 c3 



S cor§ S 



<P 8 gW 



ipQ r 8ib - 
d 

< ^O w So 

d r? —- d O 

5i -X O <D 

o a o oQ rH 

r& CD O p|^ 



oooooowwwwwww 



110 




M 

eg 

H 08 


» 


oooooooooocooooocooooooo 

CDOOOCO^OOOINHCO^ONCOH^OOOO 


Total Cash 
on Persoi 

and 
Real Est 


CO <N Tri O 

r- 1 


(NOOJQNOOCOfNWO^ 

CD CO HHN 


<N h O O 

co co 



oooooooo 

COOOOO^HOO 



o 



OOOOOOOOOOO 

©^O(N(NH^00OO 



CO <N rH O 

tH ^ CO 



(MOO 
CO 



CO (N <M O CO 



<N 



O CO 
CO (M 



OOOOOOOO 
0000»000i0 
CO O O *C <N o t^ 



o 
o 

CO 



ooooo»ooooo 

000*-00i— I O *0 O O 
CO <M O 00 CO (MHQiO 



rH <M (N 



iO 



rH CO 



iO o 



M ■ 

_ a- 



O CO 

O rH 



o 



00 
CO 



CO 



<M 

00 



o 

CO 

o 



■2*« "3 


O 


i^ 


o 


o 


ega 
ae c 
son 
tate 


iO 


t^ 


co 


o 


t^ 




GO 


00 
















CO 


CO 





>> CD 
CD ZZl 

•3TE 

~ CD 

« s 
5 § 

CD 

h3 ** 

^3 Pi 

WW 



PI 

o 

w 
O 

PQ 

o r 

Or-) 

a-S 

c3 CD 

CD r> 

2-rf 

Ph ^3 

,3 a 

23 



Pi 

O 
•+-5 
m 
^3 O 
h CO 

go* 
O S 

~*CD 
-s CO 

r^ P-H 

Pi fl? 

CD O 



° » o 

•pq ° § 

CD c3 " 

4^ c3 O 

-4-= H CD 
gOr-3 

£ CD O 



S ^ 

fceV $ 

p- CD 

-.Pi 

^ o 

-a .3 



a 
o 

■+3 

bfi 

g 
'x 

CD 



co 

. o 



o 

CD w O 

ffl -5p3 

" CD ^3 

~r, CD 



:3 f§ § 



-n CD 

Pi o 

CD *h 

PP Pi 



> * "5 

CD CD O 



bfi 

1? P 1 J^ 

^ 02 o3 03 
O ° -Li] 

U-3 9 - 

s s a cd 

'3.2 o o 



Ill 



OOOOThOOOOOOOOOCOOOOOOOOOO 
OINNOOONO^NOOOOHO^INONOOCOOO 



00 I>- 05 



<M CO 00 ^H CO t*H tO <M rH 

CO ^h 



OO ^OOOO O O O CO O O O O O O O 

O <M OOONO^ O O O rH O ^H <M O <M 00 O 

00 l> t}h rH CO (N ^W^M<MCDH^NHO 

<M <N CO OOrtHOO'sHiOC^ CD 



iO 



CO 



o o 
o o 

^ CD 



o o o o o 
t^ o o o o 

O rH O <M 



ooooooooooo 

OOOOOOOOOOtOO 

O^OOHiONHOCOHO 



<M 



CO 



r^ co (M 

CO 



CO tH 



<M 



o 

CO 



00 



o> 



00 



CD 



o 

00 






O 00 
CD 00 



iO 



iO 


CO 


o 


O CO 


T— 1 


(M 


io 


o t^ 


00 


lO 


CD 


CO 














^ 


TjH 



d 

o 

rd O 

bC bfi 

PQ-2 



-^ Cl d 



w 



Ph 



>> CD 



^ CD CD CD 

g gww 

©-^^ E 



P^Ph^^ 



I rW o 

<s CD 03 -* 

9 |°3 J 



d 

o 

CO 

O 

PQ 
8 3 § 

111 

H r - 
» S § 

^r^ CD 

o.sa 
O^ £ 

rf >^ O 

d o o 

d -t-3 "4-3 

mmm 



.73 

. o 

: a 

. o 



8g 



. "H , «-4-H +=> ^ 

d d d Bfc? a . 
■§ °3 o 2 ~ d P* 

QQ -^ CD w £. & 



03 H 

r-a£ 

~ 03 

o o 



W "£ 03^^ r W 

d S'S^ r H a 



cd 



■+^ a a d © © 
o d d m ofpiij H 

CD o o o cd r3 2 
^^^^^^^ 



CO 



O 

&£ 
ord 

- CO 
GO .rM 

CD g 



112 



H 


O O 


Q 


o o o o o o 


s 

H 2 S 


(NC^OC^00 00O(N05 


•*o " 


OO^ 


H^iOIMHCO 


S £t?W 


1—1 


H C^l 


-tf iH 


Q a. fl 






t-H 


> d 1 








o o w 








H 








M 5 

03 03 




oooooooo 


H. OB 




eMO(N00OO<MO 


_ flpq 








03 ° — 




O tH 


H-^^NHCO 


2 8 




t-H (M 


Tfl 1— 1 


H « 






T-H 


*-$ 




0000000*0 


«°S 




lOOOOOOOC^ 






00 O^t-h t* O^O^t-h CO 








T-H 


V 








eS 


c 




o 


K -g 


<N 




00 


H H 


cr. 




!_, 


1°1 
o o 


r-i 






09 








Ph 








^» 


a 




o 


8>2 § S 


G 




iO 


£— p » 


cc 




T-H 




T— 


1 




^ 














03 








bJD 










•Snd 


• 










Sh O 










' 


: 1° 


• fl 


a 
a 


c 
C 




T3 

o 
o 

a 
o 


GO , * 2 


• o 

03 £f 

•3 8 


o 


IE 


<+- 


o 


03 . fl ri « 


o 

s 

03 


> — ■ 


a is 




p 


<-T ^ 




?_ 


rt a> 


O 03 ?h - ^ ^ 




o. 

■+= 


3 -« 15 © © .8 .g -8 
"g a> 03 03 cd .75 .12 .~S 




S= 


£ 


£££££ 


^^ 



/ 



113 



WATER COMMISSIONER'S REPORT 

The Water Commissioners hereby present their Annual 
Report : — 

There has been no construction work done during 
the past year, the Commissioners have confined them- 
selves to the regular routine work, endeavoring to keep 
the expenses as low as is consistent with good service. 

A small Air Compressor installed at the Pumping 
Station at an expense of $60.00 has proved of value. 

New grates have been placed under one of the boilers. 

A survey of several of the later extensions of pipe and 
maps of the same have been made but will not be 
entirely completed until the ground opens in the spring. 
When this work is done, there will be a complete atlas 
of the Water System. 

Owing to the change in the fiscal year of the town, 
we recommend that the fiscal year of the Water Works 
be changed from July 1 to January 1, thus enabling 
the collection of the Meter Rate, December 1, before 
the closing of the accounts of the year. 

We recommend that a vote be passed requiring the 
Water Rate to be collected by August 1 and the meter 
rates before June 25 and December 24 respectively in 
each year. 

We have referred the matter of a new pump to Mr. 
William S. Johnson, C. E., of Boston for his advice. 

His letter speaks for itself and is included as a part 
of this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 
JOSEPH S. HART, 
WILLIAM H. SHERMAN, 

Water Commissioners. 



114 

February 15, 1915. 
Board of Water Commissioners, 

Lincoln, Massachusetts. 
Gentlemen : — 

In accordance with your request I have made a study 
of the advisability of installing an electrically-operated 
pump at your pumping station, to be used in connection 
with the steam pumping plant, and have made estimates 
of the cost of such an installation, and beg to submit the 
following report. 

At the present time the pumping is done by a steam 
pump having a capacity of 1,000,000 gallons per 24 
hours, or about 700 gallons per minute. The pump 
operates against a head of 160 feet. The average 
quantity of water pumped is about 210,000 gallons 
per day, varying from 150,000 gallons in the winter 
months to nearly 350,000 gallons in the month of 
maximum consumption. 

The reservoir is of large capacity so that it is not 
necessary to run the pump every day and the time of 
pumping varies from 17 days in winter months to 25 or 
26 days during the summer months. When the pump 
is not in operation the fire beneath the boiler is banked 
and the cost of the coal required for keeping the fire 
while not pumping adds very largely to the cost of 
pumping. The total cost of coal consumed in a year 
is about $1,300. 

The plant seems to be in good condition and is doing 
as good work as can be expected by any steam plant 
of this description. 

If electricity is used as motive power I would recom- 
mend the installation of a triplex pump having a capacity 
of about 1,000,000 gallons per day operated by a motor 
connected with the pump by a chain. I have considered 
very carefully the use of a centrifugal pump. The first 
cost of such an installation would be considerably less 



115 



than the cost of a triplex pump but the triplex pump 
will raise from 15 per cent, to 20 per cent, more water 
with the same amount of power than will the best 
centrifugal pump, even when new, and the centrifugal 
pump loses its efficiency with continued use, while the 
efficiency of the triplex pump will not decrease. The 
saving in current by using the more efficient triplex 
pump will much more than pay the interest on the 
difference in cost between the two installations. 

The chain drive is recommended in order to reduce 
the noise, which would be considerable with a direct 
connected plant. The best terms which I have been 
able to get for electricity from the Edison Company 
are as follows: — 

For the first 20 k.w. hours each month, 10c. per k.w. hr. 
For the next 1,980 k.w. hours, 3c. per k.w. " 

For anything in excess of 2,000 k.w. hours, 2c. per k.w. " 

Based on these figures, the cost of electricity required 
to pump the quantity of water which is used at the 
present time would be about $1,500 per year as against 
$1,300 which has been paid for coal. If electricity is 
used, however, it will be necessary to heat the pumping 
station and boiler room and for this purpose a steam or 
hot water heating plant should be installed. The cost 
of the coal required for heating the station would be 
about $100 per year, which should be added to the cost 
of maintaining the electric plant. On the other hand, 
there should be a considerable saving in the bill for 
repairs, oil and waste. These items at the present time 
amount to about $400 per year, and with the triplex 
pump and motor they should not be more than about 
half of this amount. It would certainly be safe to assume 
that the saving in oil, repairs and waste will offset the 
cost of coal for heating the station. 

It would appear, therefore, that to pump by electricity 
would cost annually for power about $200 more than 



116 



the cost of coal used in the present plant. There is an 
important difference, however, in the cost of attendance 
for the two plants. At the present time I understand 
that the engineer who operates the plant does considerable 
work in connection with the water works system and 
that his time is more than taken up in the two branches 
of the work. During the past year or two it has been 
necessary to hire additional labor to assist the engineer. 
If the electrically-operated pump is installed the time 
required by the engineer at the pumping station will be 
very much reduced. The electric pump can be started 
within a few minutes after the engineer reaches the 
pumping station, as there will be no fires to start and, 
after having oiled the machinery and after seeing that 
everything is running smoothly, the plant can be left 
to take care of itself for the remainder of the time of 
pumping. This will obviate the necessity of the addi- 
tional man at the pumping station and it will give the 
engineer much more time to attend to other matters 
which require his attention. In this way a very 
susbtantial saving can be made and it will probably 
save employing an additional man during much of the 
time. 

One of the disadvantages of electricity as a motive 
power in water works installations is that there may be 
some interruption in the service, and I would recommend 
that the present steam plant be maintained so that in 
cases of emergency the pump can be started. The cost 
of keeping the old plant in readiness for service will not 
amount to very much and it could readily be started 
before the reservoir would be exhausted, even in case 
of a large fire. 

I have made as careful an estimate as possible of the 
cost of installing a triplex pump having a capacity of 
from 1,000,000 to 1,250,000 gallons with a 50 h. p. motor 



117 



and find that it can be installed, together with a heating 
plant and all the necessary connections, for about $4,700. 

The pump which I would recommend would be one 
large enough to pump 1,000,000 gallons at a low speed. 
Such a pump can be safely speeded up to pump 1,250,000 
gallons if it should be found desirable to do so. A 50 h. p. 
motor would be capable of operating the pump under 
either of these conditions. 

Under the circumstances, I believe that it would be 
economy for the town to install such a plant, and I would 
very strongly recommend that it be done. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. JOHNSON. 



118 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS FOR n MONTHS 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1914. 



Lincoln Water Works, Lincoln, Middlesex County, Mass. 

General Statistics 

Population by census of 1910, 1,175. 
Date of construction, 1874. 
By whom owned, Town. 
Source of supply, Sandy Pond. 
Mode of supply, Pumping. 

Pumping Statistics 

Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon, Cross compound Fly Wheel 
Pump, 12" and 20§" x 5f " x 12". 
Description of fuel used. 
Kind, hard and soft coal. 
Brand of coal, Lackawanna, New River. 
Average price of hard coal per gross ton, delivered, $7.42. 
Average price of soft coal, per gross ton, delivered, $5.75. 
Percentage of ash. 
Wood, price per cord, $5.00. 

Coal consumed for 11 months pumping, 311,833 lbs. 
Pounds of wood consumed, equivalent amount of coal, 

1951 lbs. 
Total equivalent coal consumed for 11 months, 360,032 

lbs. 
Total pumpage for the 3 r ear, 76,757,500 gallons. 



119 



Average static head against which pumps work 148.5 ft. 
Average dynamic head against which pump works 160 ft. 
Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent coal, 

189+. 
Duty. 
Cost of Pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 

viz., $2,827.94. 
Per million gallons pumped, $36.56. 
Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic), 22.8+ 

cents. 

Statistics of Consumption of Water 

Estimated total population at date, 1,175. 
Estimated population on lines of pipe, 1,145. 
Estimated population supplied, 1,145. 
Total water pumped for the year, 76,757,500 gallons. 
*Passed through meters, 18,092,220 gallons. 
Percentage of consumption metered 22.3+. 
Average daily consumption, 210,294+ gallons. 



^Metered Waters is for 11 months. 



120 



Statistics Relating to Distribution System. 



Mains. 

1. Kind of pipe, cast iron 16. 

and cement lined. 

2. Sizes, from 4" to 12". 

3. Extended feet. 17. 

during year. 18. 

4. Discontinued ft. 19. 

during year. 20. 

5. Total now in use, 

26.411 miles. 21. 

6. Cost of repairs, per 

mile, 
7.\ Number of leaks per 22. 
mile, 0.26. 

8. Length of pipes less 23. 

than 4 inches diam., 
900 feet. 24. 

9. Number of hydrants 

added during year, 0. 

10. Number of hydrants 25. 

(public and private ) 
now in use, 122. 26. 

11. Number of stop gates 

added during year, 0. 

12. Number of stop gates 

now in use, 133. 

13. Number of stop gates 

smaller than 4 inch, 
4. 

14. Number of blow-offs, 

30. 

15. Range of pressure on 

mains 40 lbs. to 102 
lbs. 



Services 
Kind of pipe, galv. 

iron and cement 

lined. 
Sizes, f" to 4". 
Extended 56 ft. 
Discontinued 00 ft. 
Total now in use, 

miles. 
Number of service 

taps added during 

year, 7. 
Number now in use, 

325. 
Average length of 

service, 12 feet. 
Average cost of serv- 
ice for the year, 

$15.00. 
Number of meters 

added, 0. 
Number now in use, 

43. 



121 



u 
o 

Oh 

(A 
0) 



d 6 ^ 






cOOltOOOCOi-nt^ 
^,— itOtOtOt^t^i— • 



tO O tO 
CO CO t— I 



T-HtOOltOOlr-li— It^ 



^H t-H Ol 



«-2 

X ""is 

"I 



53s 
&S 

§ O 
03 



00 

o 

i — 3 






^3 



Oh , 



t^ CD T— I Ol T-H T-H 

(M CO OS r^ t^ O 

^1 r "t °~ "^1 ^ ^L 
co" of !>•" o" GO" TjT ^ 

CO W (N CO (N ^ CO 



N GO CO »0 N CO 
(M CO 00 00 CO CO 
ON O0N O ^ 



CO CO 
t- 00 



O Ol O 00 

^H Ci CO CO 

H Ol tH 



1< CO iON h 
CO CO CO Ol CO 



CO CO Ol o o 
tO CO CO O 05 

(M CO H H 



CO o o o 

TjH i-H CO O 

of of 



o to 
o to 

to 00^ 

of 



O I>- O tH 00 o 

^ CO (N N ^ N 
^ CO^ T-H^ t-h tq^ o^ a 

^f CO Co" CO co" tjh" co" ^h" rtT co" co" co" 



(^ O ^ N CO ^ 
05 N O CO h 00 
Ol 00 to t* CO l> 



OlOOCOOOCiOOOtOGiOr-i 
rHOOOOOl^OOOCO^OlOl 

^cH ^ ^h CO O CO N iO ifl X h ^ 

cT to" co co" ^ cf O O OS r— i CO t* 
OIOIOIOIOICOCOCOOICOOIOI 



COtOtOtOtO^tOtOtOtOtOtO 
OIOIOIOIOIOIOIOIOIOIOIOI 



COQQGOOOOOQiO^NOH 
OG00CG000OOQ050305Q 



ooooooooo 
ooooooooo 

O^ tO to to to O^ to o^ o 

"" cT oT t-T co*" (xT co** *-T t> 



co to co a: Ol 

© r-J^ O^ 00^ l-H 

co" to" to" to" co" 



H CO N CO 

Cq H N O 

o" l> fcC co" cd 



o o o 

o o 
o^ co o^ 

co" to" to" 

01 to O 

GO CO N 



TH T* 



^ S h 

03 3 *§ - . 

£ M 2 W fc^ 

flr£ Qg ^03 C^h'^Oh-S b CD 

<$ r^ *£ 5?^ 2 ^3 V £ >2 X 



03 



s^ I g 

> o 

CD 



00 
Ol 



© 

tO 
Ol 

co" 
© 
CO 



Ol 

q 
of 



GO 

CO 

go" 



CO 
Ol 
Ol 

CO" 



CO 

dS 

CO 
CO 



tO 
Ol 



CO 



o 
o 

!>•" 

to 

co" 



122 
RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 



Domestic, 


$6,672 23 




Hydrants, 


1,830 00 




Public Buildings, 


75 50 




Highway Department, 


22 00 




Cemeter}^ Commissioner, 


20 00 




Total Domestic Rate, 




18,619 73 



Meters 
Boston & Maine R. R. Company, $1,022 27 



Water Troughs, 
Centre School, 
Other Meter Rates, 


472 49 

94 50 

1,098 50 


Total Meter Rates, 
Interest, 
Sundries, 


$2,687 76 
23 66 
12 60 


Balance from 1913, 


14 87 


Total Receipts, 


$11,358 62 


Payments 
Expense, 
Fuel, 
Salaries, 
Interest, 


$55 00 
1,288 70 
1,484 87 
3,135 00 


Repairs and Renewals: — 




Account Reservoir, 

Service Pipes, 
Pipe System, 
Pump Station, 


$4 25 
188 44 
182 83 
520 99 



123 



Construction : — 




Ex. of Pipes, 

Account Service Pipes, 
Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, 


$29 55 

194 48 

2,000 00 

2,173 37 


Total, 
Balance on hand, January 1, 1915, 
Uncollected, 


$11,257 48 
101 14 

2,078 07 



124 



WATER 



Payments 

James T. Laird, Services as Superintendent 

and Engineer, 
James T. Laird, Services as Collector, 
James T. Laird, Labor of Horse and Truck, 
William S. Johnson, Services for Engineering, 
National Express Co., Express, 
Boston & Maine R. R., Freight, 
Edison Electric Light Co., Light, 
M. L. Snelling, Coal, 
Thomas Groom & Co., Printing, 
First National Bank, Coupons due March 1, 

1914, 
John F. Farrar & Son, Labor of Men, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Labor of Men, 
Frank H. Cunningham, Pumping, 
James E. Baker, 1J Cords of Wood, 
A. P. Peterson, Plants, 
R. B. Laird, Making out Water Bills, 
Isaac N. MacRae, Labor and Supplies, 
Daniel MacAskill, Labor and Supplies, 
M. H. Doherty, Auto Hire and Teaming Freight 
Martin M. Sherman, Mowing Reservoir Grounds 
W. C. Peirce, Rent of land from July, 1914 to 

July, 1915, 
Hodge Boiler Works, Labor of Men and Carfares, 
P. J. Whelan, Mason Work, 



$960 00 


175 


00 


58 


90 


26 


00 


3 


14 


4 


67 


9 


10 


1,241 


20 


5 


50 


857 


50 


69 


75 


217 


95 


109 


87 


7 


50 


6 


00 


15 


00 


35 


86 


14 40 


Lt, 28 


15 


LS, 2 


00 


5 


00 


, 11 


97 


18 


45 



$8 25 


10 


00 


8 


75 


5 


00 


3 


00 


2,173 


37 



125 



Martin Sherman, Labor, 

Cemetery Commissioners, 2 Cords Pine Wood, 

C. S. Smith, If Cords Wood, 

C. S. Smith, Piling used in Pond, 
Thomas E. Coburn, Labor, 
Sinking Fund Commissioners, Sinking Fund, 
Joseph S. Hart, M. D., Services as Water 

Commissioner, 75 00 

William H. Sherman, Services as Water Com- 
missioner, 75 00 

George L. Chapin, Services as Water Com- 
missioner, 

Roger Sherman, Moving Ashes, 

William H. Sherman, 4 J Cords Pine Wood, 

Eagle Oil and Supply Co., Supplies, 

Henry R. Worthington, Supplies, 

Union Water Meter Co., Supplies, 

Deane Steam Pump Co., Supplies, 

Builders Iron Foundry, Supplies, 

S. H. Davis Co., Supplies, 

Walworth Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

Davis & Farnum Co., Supplies, 

National Meter Co., Supplies, Meters and 
Repairs, 

Chadwick Boston Lead Co., Supplies, 

Westinghouse Air Brake Co., Air Compressor, 

Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., Supplies, 

Gurlock Packing Co., Supplies, 

D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler Works, 1 set Grates, 
Waltham Coal Co., Supplies, 
Boston Coupling Co., Supplies, 
International Steam Pump Co., Supplies, 
Lincoln Press, Supplies, 
Jas. L. Chapin & Son, Supplies, 
Wadsworth Howland Co., Supplies, 
Boston Steam Pump and Repair Co., Supplies, 



75 


00 


4 


76 


21 


25 


121 


04 


27 


00 


41 


96 


23 


47 


12 


94 


1 


04 


75 


67 


14 


32 


75 01 


13 


52 


60 


00 


17 


55 


5 32 


78 


11 


9 


50 


1 


20 


40 00 


2 25 


4 


84 


5 


65 


6 


90 



126 



Town Treasurer, Coupons, Due May 1st, 


$87 50 


" June 1st, 


602 50 


" Sept. 1st, 


857 50 


" Dec. 1st, 


602 50 


" Nov. 1st, 


87 50 


Water Works Bond, Due 




Sept., 1st, 


500 00 


Water Works Bond, Due 




Sept., 1st, 


500 00 


Town Treasurer, Payment Coupons, $40.00 




and Bond $1,000.00, Series 1914, 


1,040 00 


Total, 


$11,257 48 



127 



CD 
tO 

iO 

00 
CO 
CO 



CD 
tO 

to 

00 

co~ 

T— I 



o 

o 



O H 

o o 

CO co 

OO CM 

m t-h 



CM 

00 



o 
o^ 

oo~ 
o 

CM 



m 

O 
|^ 

o 






T-H 
T-H 

CO 

CD 



CD 
CD 
CD 



g 
d 

CD 

go 

d 

o 



d 

CD 

!> 

CD 



H-> 



O O !>• tH 

O H 00 CO 



to 



lO iO ^ t-H CD 
tO 00 00 t-h Ci 
^ CO Th t-H 00 

t-T t-h" co~ 



CM 

LO 

cd" 



I- 



m 

I— I 

H 

►— I 
r— I 

PQ 

HH bJO 



T5 

d 

+^> 
go 

+-> 
d 

o 

GO 



CD 

*o 

tO 
00 

co~ 

1 1 

m 







CD e *" 








H 






m 






CD CD 








Ph ^ 








^£ 




pense, 
el, 


oT 


tf 2.A • 




p 

s 


m b ^ 

£ -a m 




x ? 




^g CD 0) 
►5 Ph" £ 




o 








H 









CO 

d 

§ s 
P3 <£ 



t-H tH 

CD t-H 



00 T-H T^ 

Th O t-H 

00^ t-h CM 

T-H 

00 

t-H 

m 



O 00 
CD I>- 

IS o^ 
co~ cm" 

CM 



CM 

00 



o 
© 

OO 

o 

CM 



d d 


■ u 


O c3 


d s 

Ph § 


*■§ w 


F 1 d 


bC ^ 


3 ~ o 


d h 


Cons 
Cash 
Fuel 


Sinki 
Wate 



128 



WATER WORKS DEPARTMENT 

OUTSTANDING WATER BONDS 

Issue of 1897, due 1917, $10,000 00 

Issue of 1900, due 1930, 23,000 00 

Issue of 1902, due 1932, 9,000 00 

Issue of 1903, due 1933, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1904, due 1934, 5,000 00 

Issue of 1906, due 1936, 14,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due 1937, 4,000 00 

Issue of 1907, due each year, 6,500 00 

Issue of 1911, due each year, 4,500 00 



$81,000 00 



WATER RECEIPTS 

Domestic, $8,619 73 

Meters, 2,687 76 

Uncollected, 2,078 07 

$13,385 56 



129 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

The usual routine of work necessary to the respectable 
appearance of the grounds has been attended to. As 
the removal of debris that naturally accumulates during 
the fall and winter months goes to make up the larger 
part of the work, little permanent improvement is 
established as it must be repeated from year to year. 
While the cleaning process is indispensable something 
more is needed to materially change for the better the 
general appearance of the cemetery. A single item 
of much importance and to wmich attention should be 
called is the removal of trees lacking in natural beauty 
and detrimental to the growth and development of 
more desirable ones. It is hoped that the holders of 
private lots may take this view of the matter as there 
are still a few remaining. The most serious handicap 
in the past and one that confronted all alike, has been 
the lack of available water. To bring it from outside 
the grounds or from the small water hole within, meant 
little water and much labor. This fact alone precluded 
the using of any considerable amount, and discouraged 
all attempts at floral decoration. If we wish to create 
a general interest in the beautifying of our cemetery by 
the grading and seeding of lots and the growing of 
ornamental shrubs and flowers we should not withhold 
this most important element. 

The free use of water on a private estate is considered 
absolutely essential to its attractive appearance. Why 
not equally so on public grounds? A start has already 
been made the past season by the laying of nearly (500 ) 
five hundred feet of pipe. A further extension the 
coming year of approximately (1,000) one thousand feet 



130 

would complete the circuit and bring the water within 
convenient reach of nearly every lot holder. By so 
doing we remove the one obstacle now in the way of 
green turf and thrifty shrubbery. 

Under existing conditions should a comparison be 
made with the cemeteries in other towns of the wealth and 
standing of Lincoln it is a known fact that our own 
would be found wanting. 

Our public buildings are a credit to the town. Our 
cemetery can be made to harmonize. As a permanent 
improvement in addition to the extension of water more 
trees and a few beds of ornamental shrubs should be 
planted. 

If the good of the future is considered the matter 
becomes highly important. 

The clipping of the hedge around the triangular 
cemetery has been passed over for several years, as the 
use of the money in other parts seemed more desirable. 
It should now be attended to within the near future. 

The above items are especially referred to as being a 
matter of additional expense for the coming year. That 
less general care should be given the cemetery in order 
to make the changes suggested seems hardly advisable, 
as they are all improvements of a permanent character. 

Accepting this point of view, an increase in the town's 
appropriation becomes unavoidable. 

The sum of ($500) five hundred dollars for use the 
coming year is respectfully requested. 

Referring to the matter of deeds from the town to 
holders of lots in the cemetery, such may be had at any 
time by giving due notice to the Cemetery Commissioners. 
Respectfully submitted, 

JULIUS E. EVELETH, 
GEORGE L. CHAPIN, 
ROGER SHERMAN, 

Cemetery Commissioners. 



131 



THE TOWN TREASURER IN ACCOUNT WITH 
THE LINCOLN CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Received of Fitchburg R. R. Co., dividends .... $10 00 

" American Sugar Refining Co., dividends . . 28 00 

" " Union Pacific R. R. Co., dividends ... 30 00 

" for One-half Cemetery lot ..... . 7 50 

" " Wood sold 10 00 

Total $85 50 

Deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings .... 85 50 



The following is a list of Securities of the Lincoln Cemetery Com- 
missioners : — 

Foui' Shares American Sugar Refining Co., preferred stock. 
Three Shares Union Pacific R. R. Co., preferred stock. 
Two Shares Fitchburg R. R. Co., preferred stock. 

Also the following funds for the care of lots in cemetery, all of which are 
deposited in the Middlesex Institution for Savings: — 
Orilla J. Flint Fund, $300.00, interest accrued .... $37 82 
Samuel Hartwell Fund, $300.00, interest accrued ... 37 82 

John H. Pierce Fund, $500.00, interest accrued ... 57 52 

Maria L. Thompson Fund, $500.00, interest accrued T r f 62 % 

Annie A. Ray Fund, $300.00, interest accrued .... 37 82 

Also 
General Fund deposited in Middlesex Institution for Savings 

amounting to 519 24 

(Signed) CHARLES S. WHEELER, 

Town Treasurer. 
E. & O. E. 



132 



TREE WARDEN'S REPORT 

The Tree Warden submits to the town his report for 
the year 1914. 

During the past year the work has been carried on as 
formerly, cutting the brush and removing the dead limbs 
from the trees along the highways. We also cut down a 
number of dead trees. The trees on all the highways 
were sprayed, going over some of them the second time 
with very good results. Elms, maples and other trees 
have had a beautiful foliage this year and looked far 
better than they have for many years. 

The winter was rather severe and there was some 
complaints of winter killing both above and below the 
ground which has especially affected apple trees, and 
many large as well as young trees have died from injury 
to the roots. The Gypsy moth problem is still a serious 
one on account of the large acreage of uncared for 
woodland. While we can control these insects on 
our roadside trees and in orchards by using proper 
methods at the right time, such as creosoting nests and 
spraying with arsenate of lead, it is extremely difficult 
in our woodland owing to the small amount of money 
that any owner can afford to expend on this work. 
During the past year the work of the natural enemies 
of the Gypsy moth, including the imported parasites, 
the Calosoma beetle and the wilt disease has served to 
reduce the number of the insects in badly infested 
localities, and it is hoped that when these enemies of 
the moth have become established in large numbers over 
the entire infested territory the insect will be much 
less destructive than it is at present. Until such time 



133 



however, the most effective hand or mechanical methods 
of fighting this pest should be continued. 

The browntail moth infestation is very light this 
year which is due largely to a fungous disease which 
attacks the caterpillars in the spring. Like all diseases 
of this nature the benefit derived from it is regulated 
largely by favorable or unfavorable weather conditions. 
This fungus sometimes works on the small caterpillars 
in the fall and in some instances it is found in the winter 
webs. 

The spraying for the elm leaf beetle was very effective 
this year and the results attained were very encouraging. 
We shall have the beetle with us for some years to come, 
so it is necessary to have the elms sprayed thoroughly 
and as early as possible. 

The apple tree tent caterpillars were very abundant 
last summer. The eggs are laid in bands around small 
twigs of cherry, wild cherry and apple trees in July 
covered with a brown gum which hardens, and they 
hatch the following spring; the caterpillars spin a web 
or tent in a fork of a limb and go out from this to feed 
in the morning returning to the web at night. Fruit 
trees sprayed with arsenate of lead just after the blossoms 
fall are by this protected from the caterpillars. Another 
good remedy when they are small is to drop a few drops 
of creosote with a brush in the web. The creosote spreads 
all over the web and it is sure death to little caterpillars. 
Another forest pest is the forest tent caterpillar. Its 
life is very similar to that of the common tent caterpillar 
although it does not spin a web of any kind, this insect 
is a forest pest although it attacks both shade and orchard 
trees. It is generally held in check by natural enemies 
in form of parasites and diseases, but if serious outbreaks 
occur the insect may be controlled by spraying with 
arsenate of lead. 



134 



The total expenditure of this department this year 
was $3,750.98; $3,365.07 for moth work and $385.91 
for tree work, there has been $1,640.90 paid the Town 
Treasurer on account of private work leaving a net 
cost of $2,110.08 

I recommend that $2,500.00 be appropriated this year; 
$2,000.00 for moth work and $500.00 for tree work. 



Respectfully submitted, 



JOHN J. KELLIHER, 

Tree Warden. 



135 



FOREST WARDEN'S REPORT 

To the Board of Selectmen: — 

Gentlemen : — 

In compliance with your request for a brief report. 
The Town has been very fortunate in late years in not 
having any serious fires to contend with, but this year 
we have had our share. There were six fires which 
were s